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I need a little help.  I bought a new boat last fall and it has a little quirk every time I recover it. I can never load it all the way to the bow roller without winching the last 18" and it always still lacks a couple inches from touching it.  The boat is completely on the bunks.  

Ive tried backing in farther which just runs the bow under the roller.  If I dont back the trailer in as far, I just have to winch more and I can tell its straining the strap.   I haven't seen any "no power loading" signs but I dont think I should have to turn 4500 rpms to get it to the roller either.  Is there anything I can add or try to recover the boat correctly?  

I've gotten used to it and still get in and out quickly but it is kind of an unneeded inconvenience.  

 

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The easy part is the second part, If you look at the u bolts holding the winch stand you see a reflector next to the rear u bolt.  Loosen both u bolts and move the stand back so the rear u bolt is behind that reflector, so about 2 inches maybe. now your bow roller should be next to the bow eye. Tighten both u bolts back up tight and evenly. The boat is sitting pretty good on the trailer front to back so no problem there, 

Maybe you can change your bunks from carpeted to one of the new really "slick" bunk materials like Gator Baks. Look here  http://www.gatorbak.com/gatorbak-3-5-x-1-5-synthetic-bunk-cover-pair/

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First thing you need to do is verify it's positioned properly on the trailer.  To do this, have it loaded just like you have it when going fishing, gas in the tank and all.  You want your normal load, right where it goes, and the motor tilted up and set in place for towing.  Now take the boat to a feed supply or truck stop that has scales and weigh it with it just like you would have it fishing. 

Next you need to make sure you have your tongue height set properly on the truck.  Check with you trailer manufacture but 13.5" is a good height on most.  You set that by using different size drops on your receiver.

Now you measure your tongue weight, for smaller boats this is no problem, just set a set of bathroom scales on something at the right height and set the tongue on them.  Heavier boats can get fun trying to find a way to weigh them.  Two set of scales side by side with a 2x4 across them and set the tongue in the center of the 2x4 will work most times.  For conventional trailers with ball-mounted hitches, proper tongue weight is roughly 10 to 15 percent of the total loaded trailer weight.  For instance, if a 2,000-pound conventional trailer is loaded with 1,000 pounds of cargo, the proper tongue weight of the loaded trailer should be between 300 and 450 pounds, or 10-15 percent of the loaded 3,000 pound total.

Anyway, once you get a way of checking you tongue weight, you position the boat on the trailer by moving it forward or backwards until you have the proper tongue weight.  Once you have that, you position your front stop so that it locks the boat in place at that point.  Then you adjust your bunks and center rollers to ensure they are positioned to properly support the boat. 

Yep, it's a little bit of work, but I highly recommend you do it.  I learned the hard way that dealers don't do a very good job at setting up trailers.  The very first new boat I bought had the hull ruined by the way the dealer set the roller on the trailer.  One roller was too high and after about eight months, put a hook in the hull.  I noticed my boat was slowly loosing speed and after about eight months it had lost almost five mph. I was changing props and everything else trying to figure out why, until I found that that hook. 

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Spray your bunks with silicone after the boat is off the trailer.  Makes them slick.  Just don't unhook the strap until you've backed into the water or the boat may slide right off.

Also, if the boat is sitting fully on the bunks and you're still short of the roller the roller may be set too high.  I have the same problem with mine.  If I winch it all the way up the front of the hull lifts off the bunks slightly.  My roller is not adjustable so I leave it a bit short.

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2 hours ago, Ohio Archer said:

Spray your bunks with silicone after the boat is off the trailer.  Makes them slick.  Just don't unhook the strap until you've backed into the water or the boat may slide right off.

Also, if the boat is sitting fully on the bunks and you're still short of the roller the roller may be set too high.  I have the same problem with mine.  If I winch it all the way up the front of the hull lifts off the bunks slightly.  My roller is not adjustable so I leave it a bit short.

Another vote for silicone. It makes them much slicker. Start out spraying a small portion of each bunk then do more if needed. 

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