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So I had a tournament this weekend and we were fishing the Sassafras river in MD and I didn't realize at one point how close to the Chesapeake bay we were fishing. I have 2 questions: 1 how far does the salt water from a bay normally travel up into a river. 2 how will my Chronarch far with brackish waters if I did get to close to the Chesapeake 

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I believe the spool is magnesium so even in brackish waster estuaries it could rust. I wouldn't chance it on a reel of the price and quality of a chronarch. they are coming out with a salt friendly chronarch 200 size at iCAST this year.

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Make sure to give it a good rinse. I had read at one point that the older Chronarch 50MG had a kind of coating on it to protect it. While it wasn't rated for saltwater, as long as the coating was not scratch it would withstand the salt. I have no idea how accurate this is, but maybe it will ease your mind. Either way I'd give it a good cleaning. 

 

On a side note, the guide I use in Louisiana for redfish has several of the MGs that he takes out and he didn't seem to have any issues.

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Rinse the spool really well after you're done fishing. That spool is not designed for brackish/salt water. If possible, I would use a different reel.

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Is it just the spool that needs rinsing 

Also how far does the brackish water of the bay reach into the fresh water of the rivers? Or does it just depend on the body of water

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2 minutes ago, MDbassin said:

Is it just the spool that needs rinsing 

From what I understand yes.  It's just the spool.  However I wouldn't recommend at all exposing this reel at all, unless you already did and you're asking?  If I were you I'd clean it all off.  (tear down)

1 hour ago, Hulkster said:

I believe the spool is magnesium so even in brackish waster estuaries it could rust. I wouldn't chance it on a reel of the price and quality of a chronarch. they are coming out with a salt friendly chronarch 200 size at iCAST this year.

I thought it was a 150 size not 200?

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shimano Facebook said a 150 size but I have seen spec charts for the G that say 200 size (110 yards of 14 pound mono) which corroborates the 200 size. weird.

 

anyone know?

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You should be fine.  The salt content in the Sassafras is typically barely above freshwater levels.  I've fished with my Cores, which are magnesium-framed, on the Potomac, Upper Bay (including the Sass), and Eastern Shore rivers for years with no issues and all these waterways have saltwater influence of varying degrees.  

 

Generally speaking, you don't start seeing a noticeable shift to saltier water until you get south of the Sassafras.  It all varies month to month and year to year.  The 'salt-line' is usually further north in the summer.  Keep an eye on your boat wake, if it starts to get frothy you are getting into saltier water - the more froth, the saltier the water.

 

I'm sure you could find a salinity map of the bay if you searched around google....But I wouldn't worry too much unless you go south of the Sass.  This all assuming the MGL has similar tolerances to saltwater as the Core did/does.  

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1 hour ago, Logan S said:

You should be fine.  The salt content in the Sassafras is typically barely above freshwater levels.  I've fished with my Cores, which are magnesium-framed, on the Potomac, Upper Bay (including the Sass), and Eastern Shore rivers for years with no issues and all these waterways have saltwater influence of varying degrees.  

 

Generally speaking, you don't start seeing a noticeable shift to saltier water until you get south of the Sassafras.  It all varies month to month and year to year.  The 'salt-line' is usually further north in the summer.  Keep an eye on your boat wake, if it starts to get frothy you are getting into saltier water - the more froth, the saltier the water.

 

I'm sure you could find a salinity map of the bay if you searched around google....But I wouldn't worry too much unless you go south of the Sass.  This all assuming the MGL has similar tolerances to saltwater as the Core did/does.  

Thanks. Yea next month we have a tournament on the pocomoke so being that far south and close to the actual ocean I will probably switch the Chronarchs out with the curados 

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I am a Tidal Potomac angler and we have to have an extensive drought before the salt line begins to move up the river. I am mid point from D.C. to the bay and  fish my Chronarch MGLs all over the river. The Potomac has data buoys, accessible on line, which give you all kinds of real time water quality data but I do not  know if they exist for the Sassafras.   Try this web site:  buoybay.noaa.gov//locations

 

The new Chronach G will be a salt water version. 

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