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Sam

1903 Book on Fishing Says......

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I found the book, The Complete Fisherman and Anglers Manual or How to Catch Fish, in my home library and took it with me today to read while waiting to take a test at the hospital. (All was OK. It was a nuclear test to see if I had a cracked rib)

 

The original book was written in 1903 by Francis H. Buzzacott and reprinted in 2001 by B.A.S.S.

 

On page 20 Buzzacott penned the following:

 

"Again, fish bite well before rains, seldom well after; simply because rains wash foods in plenty from earth and soil, bringing with it and stirring up other life, at the same time, hence they are busy seeking food in such places (unknown to you) where past familiarity with the waters have taught them nature sends food to him in a more plentiful, easier way."

 

Of course, we all know about cold fronts and then bluebird skies but to read what this guy pens is outstanding, especially for someone over 100 years ago who had no scientific studies or expensive equipment nor lots of baits, rods, reels and techniques to catch bass, plus books and magazines on bass fishing.

 

Very interesting book to read to note what was thought about fishing in general over 115 years ago and how we are doing the same things, but with more scientific data to support what we do.

 

Just thought you all would get a kick out of what Buzzacott wrote all those years ago and it is still true.

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Really good stuff!

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Advancements in technology is an amazing thing, which we have greatly benefited from, ie this forum. However,  old school wisdom and experience will always have a strong place in the foundation of learning. 

 

Thanks for sharing that article. Hope all is well. 

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12 hours ago, Luke G. said:

Advancements in technology is an amazing thing, which we have greatly benefited from, ie this forum. However,  old school wisdom and experience will always have a strong place in the foundation of learning. 

 

Thanks for sharing that article. Hope all is well. 

Thanks, Luke. All is OK.

Seems I may have cracked a rib moving Christmas stuff back to the attic. So far that is the only thing the doctors can assume that is causing the pain in my left flak.

Expect to be well in another 30 or less days, just in time to hit the water on warm days.

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Interesting quote from this book that is over 100 years old. It is not 100% accurate for all locations since heavy rains can be a blessing for many types of fishing, at least in some areas I bass fish in.

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11 hours ago, soflabasser said:

Interesting quote from this book that is over 100 years old. It is not 100% accurate for all locations since heavy rains can be a blessing for many types of fishing, at least in some areas I bass fish in.

Yes. You are totally correct.

 

But for him to notice the change in the bass' behavior without any knowledge of  barometric pressure and bass movements it was a fantastic observation.

 

Very interesting book and how the sport was viewed 115 years ago.

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I watched a show about the ancient Mayans and how they built ceremonial things in perfect relation with stars and constellations. We may have a lot more technology now but don’t underestimate the knowledge of past generations 😉 they were a lot smarter than we think.

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Very cool - I like reading those older available books, they teach a lot of finer nuances that get lost to us modern fishermen between the colorful pages of a tackle catalog. 

 

It's probably the same reason that I go fishing with my 93 year old grandfather, and despite my attempts, he STILL outfishes me with the most basic tackle you'd ever see, all kept neat and tidy in one of my grandmother's old leather purses. Cracks me up, but you can't argue with the results....he's done it for decades. 

 

They learned how to fish in relation to the fish's current behaviors and proclivities. I find myself gravitating towards fishing towards the properties of a lure. It's mindsets, and the fishermen of the past seem to have done a spectacular job. 

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Was I the only one that read that quote in my 1920s radio voice...

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Based on this thread I just ordered this book on Amazon. 

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14 minutes ago, Dens228 said:

Based on this thread I just ordered this book on Amazon. 

Enjoy and laugh at what some of the suggestions are, especially regarding live baits. :D 

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52 minutes ago, Sam said:

Enjoy and laugh at what some of the suggestions are, especially regarding live baits. :D 

Oh please, you MUST enlighten us now! :) 

 

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Darren, here it is.

 

Seems some of these baits are in use today.

 

I am sure the following will help us better select our baits!!!!!

 

Enjoy.

 

ABOUT BAITS

Of all fish baits none is more tempting than the common earth or garden worms (angle worm). If presented fresh and wriggling they are the most tempting morsels to any fish and can be dug up from rich soil almost anywhere be forced to the surface of the ground by a liberal drenching.

 

Next to this and of equal worth is the minnow, the fish’s actual food. Grasshoppers. Even considered repulsive (but excellent bait) the maggot. Hellgrammite or Dobson, caterpillars, beetles, gnats, bugs, insects and flies of all kinds, raw liver, beef, the little mouse, fat or pork, or for all salt water…

 

In choosing frogs the angler should remember that the smaller ones are the best.

 

The meadow frog either green or brown is of right size but its color is too faint. The bright green tree frog of slender shape is an excellent lure, but is a poor swimmer and soon drowns; hence the best rule is to get them as small and green as possible.

 

He then goes on to explain the best way to keep your frogs alive.

 

Now go out and get some frogs. :) 

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On 4/5/2018 at 6:02 PM, Cak920 said:

I watched a show about the ancient Mayans and how they built ceremonial things in perfect relation with stars and constellations. We may have a lot more technology now but don’t underestimate the knowledge of past generations 😉 they were a lot smarter than we think.

They took the time to observe, and to actually think about what they were seeing.  Spending time and observing, and recording times and dates when the observations were made, is a tested way of learning much about the natural world.  The Egyptians, Persians, Greeks, Aztecs and other paleo-indian cultures - they all had a good understanding about the way that much of the world around them worked in environmental harmony. 

 

However, the mysteries of some phenomena like thunder and lightning, earthquakes, eclipses and other "attributes of the gods" were never adequately resolved until scientific method was applied long after those cultures had passed into history.

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There is one book on angling which has been in print for 350 years - "The Compleat Angler" by Izaac Walton ($7.94 - $14 from Amazon price varies depending on the version).  First published in 1653, it's one of the first books ever written about fishing.  It is as much a philosophical treatise as it is a fishing book.

 

Another one that's supposed to be pretty good is "Hemingway on Fishing".  Some of his first stories and newspaper articles were written about fishing where he grew up in Michigan.

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Very interesting Sam. I try to search out older books on fishing when I can find them. Of course, live bait was used much more years ago. These early writers had much insight with what they had to work with.

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