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Cluster Fluke

Jig-worm compared to T-rig

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Greetings.

A quandry for me to figure out for next year.

How do Jig-worm presentations and T-Rigs differ?

Both worms are front weighted and if you peg the weight the T-rig acts as 1 piece.

Why 1 over the other if the weights are the same?

Under what conditions is one superior over the other?

I'm trying to figure out why a jig-worm is the rage (July In-Fisherman) while a

T-Rig with weight is ho-hum.

CF

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CF,

It's not so much that one is better than the other, it's just a different presentation. If your just comparing a lead head jig with a worm trailer to the same worm T-rigged and pegged, then there's not a lot of difference. However if your jig has a skirt and the worm is a trailer, it will be altogether different. Spot removers, shakey head jigs, big football jigs, all are a different presentation and will catch fish all over the place. You should experiment will as many as you can. Sometimes taking that worm off of the T-rig and putting it on a spot remover or charlie brewer jig will load the boat. JMHO

Ronnie

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The main two differences are that a Texas rig when rigged with a straight tail worm presents the bait perpendicular to the bottom while the jighead presents the worm horizonal or parallel to the bottom and in most cases and that a jighead and worm hooks a fish in the roof of the mouth most of the time since the hook point stays up while a Texas Rig hooks a fish in the side of the lips more often where the hook can be thrown by the fish more easily. The only time I like to use a Texas rig is when getting reaction bites by dropping a worm into cover or swimming a ribbontail worm steady up off the bottom. Since most everything moves horizonal to the bottom most of the time as it travels through the water when swimming, the jighead and worm makes a more natural presentation and gets more strikes and IMHO catches bigger fish as well. There are some jigheads that make a bait stand up of the bottom when stopped because of a standup head as well but I dont want my worm to standing up because it moves the worm from the horizonal position where it works so well.

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With the exception of night fishing, most all of my worm fishing is done with a dart head or a drop shot. But at night its all about the T-rig

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I use a jighead worm when I want the bait to be suspended above the bottom or next to objects or when I am noodling. I also use something like a shakeyhead jighead for fishing rock, sand, or sparse cover. I use a Texas rig for fishing heavy cover or places that I might get a lure hung up. Why a jighead worm is the rage...no idea. I talked about this technique on this forum for a few years now well before fishermen picked up on it and before they came out with jigheads designed for this technique. Nobody had much interest in it till here recently. go figure :-/ I guess what is old will become new again given enough time.

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I guess what is old will become new again given enough time.

Reminds me of the plastic frog, it was just a memory until recently becoming popular again.  

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for me, the main difference is:

1) w/t-rig, i slowly "crawl, drag" the worm across bottom, limbs, stumps, etc.

2) w/jig head or shakey head,the bait  stays in the same place a lot longer & is "shook", then it's "hopped" a little further, etc.

just my 2 pennies

ronnie

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Guest avid
I use a jighead worm when I want the bait to be suspended above the bottom or next to objects or when I am noodling. I also use something like a shakeyhead jighead for fishing rock, sand, or sparse cover. I use a Texas rig for fishing heavy cover or places that I might get a lure hung up. Why a jighead worm is the rage...no idea. I talked about this technique on this forum for a few years now well before fishermen picked up on it and before they came out with jigheads designed for this technique. Nobody had much interest in it till here recently. go figure :-/ I guess what is old will become new again given enough time.

When Chris speaks, wise bassers listen.  

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Guest whittler

A big "AMEM" there Avid, Chris is one sharp fisherman.

Alpster, like you I think Charlie Brewer slider heads are still among the best out there. Anyone who has not read Charlie's book on do-nothing fishing should make it a point to do so.

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I forgot the part about jigheads catching suspended fish. I agree with Chris there. Ninty five percent of my worm fishing is done with dropshot rigs, jigheads and splitshot rigs. I rarely fish a Texas rig and almost never throw a Carolina rig. Most fish are not located on the bottom but just above it and unless they are real active they will not go to the bottom to get a bait on a C-rig or Texas Rig  but fishing the jighead you are fishing for the fish on the bottom and suspended off the bottom in a more effective way so it increases the number of fish that may bite the bait as well.

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Thanks to everyone for the responses.

Randall,

Are you fishing the jig heads faster so they are off the bottom further or just bigger hops?

If the fish are suspended are they feeding actively or not feeding?  I take it that if they won't go down to get a T-rig they're not active.

CF

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Suspended fish always want to eat right at the level they are suspended or just above them. Most of the time they will not pick up a bait off the bottom. Most suspended fish are inactive and not actually seeking food but just siting there waiting for it to come to them. When I fish the jighead off the bottom I don't fish it faster but use a lighter jighead and as I shake it and move it will rise up off the bottom and fall back slowly. The fact that it stays in front of the suspended fish longer than a heavy jighead or texas rig gets the fish to strike it since it is an easy meal for the fish that it will not have to chase.

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A big "AMEM" there Avid, Chris is one sharp fisherman.

Alpster, like you I think Charlie Brewer slider heads are still among the best out there. Anyone who has not read Charlie's book on do-nothing fishing should make it a point to do so.

It's nice to see I'm not the only Slider fan out there.  Charlie's book makes a lot of sense.

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I usually use a t-rig around wood,pads,heavy mats and peg it. When I am in the sparse grass areas I don't peg it. I use a jig and worm to swim with and  sometimes for flipping although I usually put a chunk on as a trailer for flippin. I also like to hop a jig and worm down points and bluffs. When the water is real clear I like to use a 1/16-1/4 leadhead and Alabama rig it. I usually use a green pumpkin or watermelon 6" trick worm for this presentation. It can be deadly and certainly seems to put a few more in the boat when nothing else seems to work.

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Being a fan of In-Fisherman, I've used a jigworm for years. Usually for outside weed edges and for swimming down slopes. Maybe I'm doing something wrong, but it seems to me that the T-rig always produces bigger fish than the jigworm.

Jim B, what's an Alabama rig? I don't recall seeing that term mentioned.

Good luck,

GK

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