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So I'm new to the forums and to the state of Washington :hi:. Had never caught a trout prior to our move here so it's a new game for me up here. I've caught many rainbows, a couple big chum salmon and just a few cutthroat. Today I went out and got on a few. The first I was sure was a brownie but after a better look I think it may have been a rainbow-cutthroat hybrid 🤷🏻‍♂️

Edit: There are spots on the tail, had to crop the pic to upload

20190217_164126.jpg

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Can't help you with trout, but welcome aboard! :) 

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Google is your friend - that's a 'Coastal Cutthroat' - like steelheads, they're Cutthroats that go to the ocean for a time.

 

https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/washington/Species/2310/

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I had googled and searched images many times before posting 😁 and I use the wdfw site often. It certainly could be a searun cutthroat but the pink and lighter color made me question if it was a rainbow, except it has the red on the bottom jaw

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Just now, SharkyMcStevenson said:

I had googled and searched images many times before posting 😁 and I use the wdfw site often. It certainly could be a searun cutthroat but the pink and lighter color made me question if it was a rainbow, except it has the red on the bottom jaw

Minor color variations in sea-run trout species (steelhead, coastal cutthroats, etc) are normal. It depends on

1) How long they were at sea

2) The specific diet they had there

3) The diet they've had since returning to fresh water

 

The WDFW site can't picture EVERY color variation, limited space. So they pick the main color variation.

 

Me? Aquatic Biology Major in college.

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Oh - one of the very distinguishing markers of a Cutbow (Cutthroat/Rainbow hybrid) is a pink stripe along the sides. Sometimes it's faint, but most times it's very prominent.

image.jpeg.8c2a531d5b7a4565df87edcab94b8fae.jpeg

image.png.efed1373bc2f78397b0306de02f7ed6b.png

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Oh very informative, thanks much. I've seen minor differences in specific species before but to me trout look pretty similar. Maybe it's just the area or that I'm new to it all in general

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1 minute ago, SharkyMcStevenson said:

Oh very informative, thanks much. I've seen minor differences in specific species before but to me trout look pretty similar. Maybe it's just the area or that I'm new to it all in general

Always room to learn more. I've been a trout fisherman since I was little - caught brookies in a stream near my home in MA growing up (age 7-11). I've fished rainbows, browns, brook and lake trout in ponds, lakes, streams and rivers.

I'm primarily a bass fisherman now, but occasionally I still go targeting trout and even panfish.

My college education comes in handy too at times.

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