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What do I need to know about battery storage near fueltank???

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I'm in the midddle of a complete redecking project on a 16' Alum. Tracker. I have 3 batteries and a 6 gallon plastic fueltank all of which will be at the far rear and in very close proximity of each other. I thought I saw here somewhere that one needs to exercize caution in this area, So I was wondering if I need to make a sealed area, tray or compartment for the fueltank and vent it somehow. One guy told me I need to installl a fresh air blower along with a vent system where the fueltank is stored, there will be a closed deck above it. I 'm not familiar with any of the safety aspects and would like input. I certainly want a safe set-up I just need to know what to be aware of and what I may need to buld in to this. What about any kind of trays I may need to build for the batteries and or fueltank ??

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While venting won't hurt, I'm not sure it's necessary for your application.

Power bilge vents are a necessity for inboard motors for several reasons.  Fuel does evaporate from carburetors.  Hardly used anymore.  All the wiring for the engine is in the same compartment as any gasoline fumes that may have accumulated, so if any thing sparks when cranking an engine, boom.  Ditto for battery fumes.

I'm assuming your six gallon tank is the one that came with the motor.  That means you must have a hatch to access it.  All you need do is open that hatch for a minute or so to allow the fumes, if any, to dissipate.  

If the tank is a built in, use a piece of copper or plastic tubing to vent the tank.  The vent can be inside the boat or outside with a through hull fitting.  Three things.  You'll need a cover over the vent to inhibit water from entering the vent.  You also should put a loop in the vent tube.  It will trap any water that might get past the cover.  The tube should also slope down to the vent, which allows any water that might splash up into the vent to drain out rather than down toward the tank.

Keep in mind, battery fumes are also explosive.  The cautionary statement that comes with batteries tell you to keep open flames away from batteries.  Sparks as well.  

When jumping a battery you should always make the ground connection last, away from the battery.

This tells me that battery connections, once secured, do not spark.

Generally, a bilge has two vents facing in opposite directions which allows for air circulation.  Depending on the wind or movement of the boat, one will be intake and the other exhaust.  It provides circulation whenever air is passing around them.

A marine supply house or boat dealer should be able to supply the appropriate parts.

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Yea the guy who said there should be a blower made a comment that the apposing scoops provide enough venting while the boat is moving but when anchord or trolling real slow it may not have enough fresh air circulation. The gas tank is a removable plastic 6 gallon type.

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Yea the guy who said there should be a blower made a comment that the apposing scoops provide enough venting while the boat is moving but when anchord or trolling real slow it may not have enough fresh air circulation. The gas tank is a removable plastic 6 gallon type.

If I were you, I'd opt for sealing the area where the tank is, to isolate it from the rest of the area below the deck. I googled "marine battery trays" and this is one of the places that came up. I cannot believe battery boxes are so cheap. It's not worth your time and effort to build them. Depending on size, the box and the tie down strap will cost from 18 - 22 bucks each.

http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=674&familyName=Attwood+-+Marine+Battery+Boxes

Google what I did, and you'll find many more responses. You might find a better deal, or product that you prefer.

I've done business with Jamestown Distributors. They have a good reputation and their prices are generally quite competitive. They handle a wide variety of marine products. They are also very knowlegable when it comes to boating.

They do business with many if not all of the marinas and boatyards in this area. That's considerable since it includes Newport, RI to Cape Cod and beyond. I'm sure they do business with establishments in Connecticut, Long Island, and into New Hampshire and Maine.

They have six pages on their site with ventilation hardware. Scope it out.

http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/search_subCategory.do?categoryName=Ventilation&categoryId=674&page=GRID&position=1&refine=1

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I would not seal it. You will never get a perfect seal. Opening the lid won't get the fumes out. Gas fumes are heavier than air and settle to the bottom which coupled with a deep hull is the reason inboards have a blower. The blower intake hose is located right at the bottom of the bilge. You open the hatch on an inboard so as the blower pulls out potentally fume loaded air it is replaced easily with outside air.

I don't know of an outboard powered bass type boat that has a bilge blower but all I know of have vents. One side has the scoops to pull in air going forward and the other side the scoops are reversed. The gas tank must be vented. If you are using the removeable tank the little screwy thing on the top of the cap is a vent.

If you are going to have a fixed tank in the unit hook up a vent with gas line rubber tubing to a vent near where you will stand when filling the tank. Helps to be able to see the tank vent(s) when fueling.

You must have a vent or your tank will pull a vacuum and the motor will be starved of fuel. There are little vents made for this purpose.

Anytime there are electrical circuits and gasoline near each other there is some risk but many bass boats have the batteries and fuel tank in the same general area. If I were you I'd contact the local boating police. Here in New Hampshire it's called Marine Patrol. The Coast Guard or your local Power Squadron could be great sources of information. Marine supply dealers could also be a good source of information but be sure you talk to someone with a great deal of experience.

You need some type of vent for the compartment since when charging the batteries give off hydrogen gas which is every bit as explosive as gas fumes.

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Do not use a battery box for permanent battery storage. They are fine for jon boat use when the battery is removed for charging. The battery gets warm/hot when charging and in use so they need to have air circulation. Also when charging is done in a closed box the gasses given off will be contained within the box and a slight spark will go KA-BOOM. Use a battery tray mounted to the boat with straps to keep the battery in place.

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Do not use a battery box for permanent battery storage. They are fine for jon boat use when the battery is removed for charging. The battery gets warm/hot when charging and in use so they need to have air circulation. Also when charging is done in a closed box the gasses given off with be contained within the box and a slight spark will go KA-BOOM. Use a battery tray mounted to the boat with straps to keep the battery in place.

Great advice, a point that could use more awareness.  

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If you are redecking there should be vents for the rear (bilge) compartment built into the hull.  I don't want to spend your money, but you might be better served with a small permanent tank that comes with a tank vent.  Also, venting the tank and venting the bilge are separate issues.  A portable tank will vent into the bilge.

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