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clooney

Please describe your casting motion !

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I picked up my first couple baitcasters recently.  Can someone please describe your casting motion with a baitcaster vs. spinning reel.  Is it a side arm wrist thing with the baitcaster ?  And, does the baitcaster have to be at a certain angle at the launch point ?  You cant cast overhead like a spinning reel can you ?  Just need so more tips on technique?  Oh, how many brakes do you leave on usually vs. the cast control knob ? Sorry about all the questions, but they don't come with directions on casting! Thanks everyone.. ;)

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Dont try casting overhanded,your lure will smack the water about 5 ft out.It can be done but not when just starting with a baitcaster.

When casting deep cranks I swing with both hands at about a 2:00 angle,left hand on the very end of the rod.

When casting a spinnerbait,small crank etc...its mostly sidearm and sometimes even kinda underhanded,it's really hard to explain by typing.

Flippin' and pitchin' is my favorite,you can really lay it in those tight spots quietly.In this case,I grab the lure in my left hand,and dip the rod down and back up quickly,just dont forget to let go of the jig ;)

The best advice for new baitcasting people is to become a "backyard bassmaster" and practice,practice,practice.Cast to different targets in your yard and be patient--you will get backlash!Just keep your thumb on the spool and leave your brake AT LEAST halfway up if not more until you get the feel of it.And as you get a feel,start letting off your thumb a little more.Just get your thumb back on the spool the same time the lure touches down to stop the spool from spinning and prevent the dreaded backlash.

Hope this helps some.My fingers are tired.

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Your basic casts will be simular to a spinning rod.  You can over head, side cast (probally the easiest) pitch, flip left or right hand.  One of the major differences will be that the spool will continue to turn and push line forward off the spool and needs to be controlled with you thumb instead of the index finger.  I don't know what type of brakes your reel uses, I am used to a Curado and it has internal centrifical weights where the more weights that you pull out the more resistance you have on the spool during a cast.   Pushing them in or "off" the easier the spool will turn.  I also adjust them where they oppose each other to keep it balanced.  Other types may have a selector slide or dial.  There should also be a friction knob on the reel's side.  To adjust the brakes try pulling out  "turning on" 3 weights  and leave 3 off "pushed in"  or adj. the dial about mid range.  Then adjust the friction knob where a practice plug or weight will just barely ease downward extracting line from the spool when the thumb bar is pressed.  Next I would pull out enough line to make a normal cast + alittle.  Place a piece of tape on the across the remaining line on the spool, to prevent excessive spooling, and keeping a small overrun from turning into a collasol mess.  Try makeing an easy side cast  and try watching the spool as the plug lands.  If it backlashes at the beginning or the during the cast  "before the plug lands,"  pull out anouther weight "on" or adj. dial + If the plug lands and then backlashes tighten the friction knob.  If every thing went ok try a longer cast. As you continue try turning off weight as you go.  Don't throw into the wind.  You may have to readjust the reel for different circumstances.  Heavier or lighter  lures, wind, until you get used to brakeing with your thumb.  Turn off as many brakes as you can and still control the reel.  You can turn off all or none.  I have been writing this a little here and there and start & stop, so I hope I have my in's and off's going right.  If not somebody correct me.

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These are two Curado's I'm dealing with. I'm casting with my right and reeling in lefty. When I cast backhanded like in tennis, with the spool axis facing towards the ground I get no backlash and everything is smooth. But many times when the spool axis is parallel to the ground I get backlash at the end of the cast. Mmm??  Is this all about having the proper centrifugal force on the spool ?

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I use a two handed side arm motion most of the time and make your cast smooth and fluent. no jerking.

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try fiddling with the mag. put your lure of choice on.then reel to the top then release the cast button so the lure hits the ground. Adjust the mag or brake until it landssmooth without backlash. Doing this will make your casting much easier(no backlash)

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I think I've got some side arm scooping motion going that seems to be working well.  "Scoop".....Is that the word we were missing to describe the casting motion ?  Or would you call it a dip ? LOL

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If it slings a lure inside the big hole in center of a fishes face I would call it catching, I guess it could be a scoop. It might be a backhanded scoop swoop with a slice. I believe you have already exceeded my level of expertise. Are you getting decent distance? You may try turning off the brake weights and maybe tighten the control knob a little bit and see if that helps on overhead.

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I've got to say the casting motion looks like art work. Start with the right hand only grasping the reel and rod. Make little circle motion with rod like the end was on fire! ;D Release! Make sure your tonge is sticking out.  :P Makes it easier to ajust for wind.  Left foot has a tendence to kick so I just knocked over my coffee.  >:(  

And thats it! Poetry in motion! ;D

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You got it Dex. That is beautiful. It just makes me want to _____. :'( :-X

Clooney, The only way I can describe it is smooth. No whips, jerks or slashes, just one smooth motion. Once you get that down you can move on to more aggressive ways to get that new wonder bait thing out there. Just remember you aren't going to be a pro at it over night. It was just a few years ago that I swore off all baitcasters. Now I can't get by without one in my hand.

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To avoid backlashes, Denny Brauer gave us this suggestion at the February 2005 Bassmaster University in Richmond:  Rig your line for fishing.  Hold the pole straight out and let the lure fall by releasing the reel's spool. Keep doing this until you no longer get a backlash in your baitcaster.  It should take only three or four tries before you have the correct balance of weight and reel drag.  It is not necessary to adjust the magnetic pins.  Only use your drag to balance the lure with your baitcaster.  You can do this at home before you leave; on your boat; or fishing off the bank.  Happy Easter!

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