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1st cool morning here. How should I fish it.

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I am in the Atlanta area. The low tonight will be 46.  Coolest of the year.  How would you guys fish the first cool morning of the year.  I am going to Stone Mountain Lake which is a beautiful old couple hundred acre body of water.

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Yes!!!! It's the MIDDLE of October and it's finally cool.  This is great.  Since I've only fished in really hot weather so far, I am curious about this as well.  I've heard you just need to fish slow....if its not slow enough....go even slower  ;)

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I would fish the Northwest side of the lake, the side that gets the most sun.  Also, I would wear a warm jacket.   ;D

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i'm gonna lurk this thread as well....hope to see more advice.I don't do too well in the fall.

Guess i'm gonna stick with the jigs and deeper cranks.

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It's been in the low 50s here the past couple days (30 miles south of Buffalo, NY).

Going to try and get out tonight after work because the wife is going to watch one of her friends kids. FREE TIME!!!!! ;D

Anyway I already have a brass and glass rigged up.

1/8 ounce bullet sinker unpegged with a black glass bead.

Fishing a Manns Hardnose worm for the first time ever in a Tequilla Sunrise color (man do these stay on the hook nice and secure, now hopefully they catch me some fish).

Going to fish it slow and see how I do.

Good to see that some responses in this thread have been about fishing slow on the bottom. Obviously thats what I was thinking about as well when I put this rig on last night. I hardly ever fish with a bullet sinker and bead so I'm actually excited. I'm usually a weightless t-rig man.

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I'll be hitting a NYC reservoir on Sunday, and like you this is the 1st weekend where we have real fall temps. I'm starting in 10-15 FOW fishing outside weedlines with cranks, spinnerbaits, Drop Shot, jigs, and even a finesse jig on the bottom, then over the weeds with reaction lures. Next step is any rocks or structure I can find and work those with the same presentations.  Hopefully, I'll find schools of baitfish and target them.

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I went yesterday and it was just after the colder weather moved in my area of SC. I could notice a giant change in how the fish were biting. The Bass were biting very slow and the Bream were not biting at all. Good luck, hopefully after a few weeks of cool weather the fish will bite again. Brian

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Water temps have dropped quite a bit up here (Chatt, TN) over the past few days, but the front that came through made the bite tough yesterday.

I would think that if the fish are not on the edges of weed beds or other shallow cover, I would back off to the next drop into deeper water and vertically jig a spoon. I would NOT go too far from the shallow cover...6-10 feet deep water, just as it starts to get deeper.

As the effects of the front wear off, the bass will begin tearing up top-water baits. You might be a day behind us on the frontal situation...it came through here yesterday.

For me, tomorrow, "way" up here...spooks around grass...yeah, THAT'S the ticket! Maybe the occasional spoon or t-rig over the other side of the boat.

Go get 'em!

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Did not do well, but the water temp was still warm, and the morning was beautiful and the sun came out and was even more nice.  Some days you just have to appreciate being out fishing even though the bite is not on.

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The answers to this question depend on what the weather was like before you reached these temperatures.  Let me give you an example.  I took Thursday and Friday off to go fishing with my Dad.  On Wednesday night, a cold front came through dropping the daytime temps from the high 80s to the low 60s.  At night the temperature dropped to 40 degrees.  This was a 25 degree drop in temperatures.  The bass, as well as just about every other fish, had lockjaw both days.  My Dad and I spoke with five other anglers and all experienced the same thing.  An extremely strong cold front can stop the bite.  If your weather gradually dropped to these temperatures, that's another story.  

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The answers to this question depend on what the weather was like before you reached these temperatures. Let me give you an example. I took Thursday and Friday off to go fishing with my Dad. On Wednesday night, a cold front came through dropping the daytime temps from the high 80s to the low 60s. At night the temperature dropped to 40 degrees. This was a 25 degree drop in temperatures. The bass, as well as just about every other fish, had lockjaw both days. My Dad and I spoke with five other anglers and all experienced the same thing. An extremely strong cold front can stop the bite. If your weather gradually dropped to these temperatures, that's another story.

That is what happened up here in NY. Same exact thing.

I'm assuming that the bite will be back here in a bit. Because Friday and yesterday were horrid for me. No bites at all.

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If you're fishing from a boat, you really want to be out BEFORE the cold fromt hits, when the barometer is dropping like mad. The 1-10 hour period before a cold front, especailly in the spring, can be some of the best fishing ever. Once the front moves through, it can crush the bite into nothing.

A great way to fish during a cold front, is first to know where the bass go when a front hits, and then fish VERTICALLY. Many times they will nestle up the top of their backs, to the underside of thick weeds. Especially the BROWN weeds as opposed to the green. The Brown stuff keeps the water warmer and the bass like it better.

Pitch a jig, a heavy jig, through the thick mats, and let the jig drop a few feet and then pick it up and literally tap the bottom of the mat. This is where the fish are, and many people fish to deep at this point. Let the bait smack the underside of the mat. Not only is this where the bass are, but by tapping the mat, your releasing all sorts of microscopic, and non micorscopic food in the water for the smaller bait fish to frenzy on. If smaller bait fish come, the bigger fish should follow. It's eaiser for a bass to eat a feeding bluegill than one that isn't.

T

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