Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
noway

Black Spots On Smallmouths

Recommended Posts

Nope, but we see them frequently here to, note the tail on the fish in the pic.

post-3451-13016301908_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

we've had lots of threads about this before. It's some sort of pigmentation alteration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its melanoma.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
emo bass
That's hilarious!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Use to come across this black-spot disease on catfish mostly, but also on bass as well.These parasitic flatworms appear as tiny black spots on the skin, fins and flesh of fish. No method of control is available for the elimination of this problem. This organism does little harm to the fish. The main problem associated with black-spot is the unsightly appearance it may cause. Skinning infected fish will remove most black spots.

The life cycle of the parasite is quite complex. A fish-eating bird (typically a great blue heron or kingfisher) eats an infected fish. The black spot or worms are released and grow to sexual maturity in the bird's intestine. The adult worms pass eggs with the bird's droppings. When the eggs reach water, they hatch into free-swimming organisms which then penetrate snails for further development. Finally, after leaving the snails they burrow into the skin of fish and form a cyst. The fish surrounds the cyst with black pigment that gives the disease its name. If an infected fish is consumed by a bird, the cycle repeats itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Use to come across this black-spot disease on catfish mostly, but also on bass as well.These parasitic flatworms appear as tiny black spots on the skin, fins and flesh of fish. No method of control is available for the elimination of this problem. This organism does little harm to the fish. The main problem associated with black-spot is the unsightly appearance it may cause. Skinning infected fish will remove most black spots.

The life cycle of the parasite is quite complex. A fish-eating bird (typically a great blue heron or kingfisher) eats an infected fish. The black spot or worms are released and grow to sexual maturity in the bird's intestine. The adult worms pass eggs with the bird's droppings. When the eggs reach water, they hatch into free-swimming organisms which then penetrate snails for further development. Finally, after leaving the snails they burrow into the skin of fish and form a cyst. The fish surrounds the cyst with black pigment that gives the disease its name. If an infected fish is consumed by a bird, the cycle repeats itself.

I've seen the above described spotting in fish before, but mostly in panfish and it has never been as dark or big as the pics being shown in this thread. I have even filet some of said panfish and dissected these little cysts.

Again, I do not think that is the same as the pics being shown in this thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Use to come across this black-spot disease on catfish mostly, but also on bass as well.These parasitic flatworms appear as tiny black spots on the skin, fins and flesh of fish. No method of control is available for the elimination of this problem. This organism does little harm to the fish. The main problem associated with black-spot is the unsightly appearance it may cause. Skinning infected fish will remove most black spots.

The life cycle of the parasite is quite complex. A fish-eating bird (typically a great blue heron or kingfisher) eats an infected fish. The black spot or worms are released and grow to sexual maturity in the bird's intestine. The adult worms pass eggs with the bird's droppings. When the eggs reach water, they hatch into free-swimming organisms which then penetrate snails for further development. Finally, after leaving the snails they burrow into the skin of fish and form a cyst. The fish surrounds the cyst with black pigment that gives the disease its name. If an infected fish is consumed by a bird, the cycle repeats itself.

I am familiar with Digenetic Trematodes, but those usually manifest as white, pill like cysts beneath the scales in muscle or gill tissue. Neascus (a digenetic trematode) appear as black dots, and is probably similar to what you've seen in catfish. It really is a fascinating life cycle. You are correct in your description of the illness, which rarely is fatal, but in the pictures you see above, is clearly malignant melanoma, and studies have shown that these fish indeed die earlier than anaffected fish from the same region. There has been a ton of recent research about this, and I haven't kept up on it. Perhaps someone currently in the field could add to this.

On a side note, all this talk of critters on the skin has me itchy all over. :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing poles

    fishing

    fishing poles

    fishing poles

    fishing reels

    fishing

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×
×
  • Create New...