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basslover12345

Write Up On Flipping Cover

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I want to try submitting this article to various bass fishing magazines, tell me what you think:

In the hot, scorching Summer months of June, July and August when it’s really hot and sticky outside many bass are heading directly to thick vegetation along with other types of cover to beat the heat. As the water warms from intense sunlight, aquatic plants such as duckweed and milfoil become denser, this attracts pretty much any species of bass. Many bass or even schools of 2-3 bass will gather and bunch up under this dense vegetation along the bank and you can present your lure to them in a variety of ways. You can locate the better grass beds and eliminate not so productive ones in a variety of ways, one of the being by flipping or punching lures using heavy tungsten or lead weights to punch through the cover with lures such as the Rage Space Monkey and the Rage Smokin’ Rooster. You can also flip or pitch this set up into any visible holes in the cover or the actual submerged grass line below the water’s surface that is sometime visible in clear water.

A good grass bed will often have multiple baitfish , such as bluegill around, both inside the grass line and outside the defined grass line and if there is wood nearby it sometimes improves the chances for it to hold bass. An example of this is when you have a overhanging bush or tree that’s roots extend into the water and are then covered with grass that matts up on top of the roots. To “test” a grass bed for bass I like to punch the vegetation with a Hack Attack jig, choosing the weight or size depending on how thick the cover is. When using the Hack Attack, I will add a trailer such as the Rage Hawg or Rage Lobster and after punching through the cover; I’ll jig it up and down vertically, or shake and hop it to draw the strike. My setup for fishing cover with Rage lures is heavy braid, fluorocarbon, or Monofilament with a Medium heavy 7’6 Bass pro shops Graphite Flippin’ stick with a 7:1:1 Gear ratio bait caster with fluorocarbon line up to 25 pound test, and Green spiderwire braid up to 65 pounds. When punching through heavy vegetation with lures such as the Smokin’ Rooster, I would recommend using tungsten weights all the way up to 1.5 ounces. When you feel a bite, make sure you are prepared for the fish to run and set the hook and bring him up out of the vegetation immediately. Sometimes bass prefer one type of vegetation, for example sometimes a bass will prefer duckweed patches that are mixed in with surface algae and to get a bite you must present your jig or soft plastic lure only in the duckweed patches. I have found that if I am flipping a bait like a Strike king tube in the grass and they aren’t eating it good enough or are just not paying attention to it then I will go ahead and place a Small, glass Zoom rattle far up in the tube and then I will shake it in the grass. Another technique I have come to love and I still use to this day is if the bass want a certain fall and the weight I’m using with my lure to achieve that fall isn’t getting through the grass or is getting hung in the grass I will then make a cast that goes straight up into the air with a lot of force so it will get through the grass more quickly, but I usually only have to use this technique when fishing pond algae that has crusted on the surface along the bank.

When you’re fishing Rage Baits in cover of any kind, you should use the appropriate pound test line so you can horse the bass out of the heavy cover quickly. While working the bait I like to keep my rod pointing down towards my lure and the cover and shake it steadily in the cover for a few seconds. When you feel a bite, wait less than a second and then set the hook hard with your rod in a vertical position over the cover. If you want to add more bulk to your jig when flipping heavy cover try adding a Smokin’ Rooster or Rage Lobster by threading it onto the hook of your jig. With the Right conditions, these techniques can pay off with some big bags of bass come tournament time or your next outing. When available, I like to flip soft plastics and Jigs under overhanging bushes and trees and let them jiggle. Usually a bass will take my jig or soft plastic as it falls or once it lands on the bottom and will run with it out of the vegetation, tree, or bush. A good time to target bushes and sunken trees with weighted soft plastics or jigs is during the post spawn. In the event of a cold front coming through I will down size both the weight and the size of the lure I’m fishing with. For example, if I was fishing a 5 inch Strike king rodent before the cold front then I would down size to a 3 inch Strike King rodent in the same color. Another thing I try when all else fails is flipping my lure directly up to the bank with the duckweed or algae.

Learning to fish cover and thick vegetation can be a very rewarding skill/technique and can produce big fish, but when you hit that “magical” grass bed it can be loads of fun. Sometimes, it may take a few times to find that perfect patch of vegetation, but when you do it will pay big dividends and most importantly BIG BASS.

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Basslsover, I am the editor of many of the articles submitted to BassResource. I have read your potential submission and will PM you with my recommendations in the next day or so. In the meantime, stay in school. Who knows? You may be the next Ernest Hemingway - but not yet.

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Ok, i did some editing, Here is the new version:

It’s 100 degrees outside and you desperately need a kicker to just possibly win the biggest tournament of your life, and what do you to? You go head to head combat with the bass; you go flipping for a chance for a monster kicker bass that will give you the absolute biggest win of your life. In the hot, scorching summer months of June, July and August when it’s really hot and sticky outside many bass are heading directly to thick vegetation along with other types of cover such as wood or other man made cover to beat the exhilarating summer heat. As the water temperature steadily increases from intense sunlight and heat, aquatic plants such as duckweed and milfoil become denser and greener; this attracts pretty much any species of bass because of the much cooler water under the grass. Many bass or even schools of 2-3 bass will gather and bunch up under this dense surface-matted vegetation along the bank and you can present your lure to them in a variety of ways. You can locate the better grass beds and eliminate not so productive ones in a variety of ways, one of the being by flipping or punching lures using heavy tungsten or lead weights to punch through the cover with lures such as the Rage Space Monkey and the Rage Smokin’ Rooster. You can also flip or pitch this set up into any visible holes in the cover or the actual submerged grass line below the water’s surface that is sometime visible in clear water.

A good grass bed will often have multiple baitfish, such as bluegill around, both inside the grass line and outside the defined grass line and if there is wood cover such as brush piles or stumps nearby it sometimes improves the chances for it to hold bass. An example of this is when you have an overhanging bush or tree that’s roots extend into the water and are then covered with grass that matts up on top of the roots. To “test” a grass bed for bass I like to punch the vegetation with a Strike king Hack Attack jig, choosing the weight or size depending on how thick the cover is and how matted it is on the surface. When using the Hack Attack, I will add a trailer such as the Rage Hawg or Rage Lobster and after punching through the cover; I’ll jig it up and down vertically, or shake and hop it to draw the strike. My setup for fishing cover with Rage lures is heavy braid, fluorocarbon, or Monofilament with a Medium heavy fast tip 7’6 Bass pro shops Fast action Graphite Flippin’ stick with a 7:1:1 Gear ratio bait caster with fluorocarbon line up to 25 pound test, and Green spiderwire braid up to 65 pounds. When punching through heavy vegetation with lures such as the Smokin’ Rooster, I would recommend using tungsten weights all the way up to 1.5 ounces. When you feel a bite, make sure you are prepared for the fish to run and set the hook and bring him up out of the vegetation immediately, this is one of the many reasons a tightened, rock solid drag is critical. Sometimes bass prefer one type of vegetation, for example sometimes a bass will prefer duckweed patches that are mixed in with surface algae and to get a bite you must present your jig or soft plastic lure only in the duckweed patches. I have found that if I am flipping a bait like a Strike king tube in the grass and they aren’t eating it good enough or are just not paying attention to it then I will go ahead and place a Small, glass Zoom rattle far up in the tube and then I will shake it in the grass. Another technique I have come to love and I still use to this day is if the bass want a certain fall and the weight I’m using with my lure to achieve that fall isn’t getting through the grass or is getting hung in the grass I will then make a cast that goes straight up into the air with a lot of force so it will get through the grass more quickly, but I usually only have to use this technique when fishing pond algae that has crusted on the surface along the bank.

When you’re fishing Rage Baits in cover of any kind, you should use the appropriate pound test line so you can horse the bass out of the heavy cover quickly. While working the bait I like to keep my rod pointing down towards my lure and the cover and shake it steadily in the cover for a few seconds. When you feel a bite, wait less than a second and then set the hook hard with your rod in a vertical position over the cover. If you want to add more bulk to your jig when flipping heavy cover try adding a Smokin’ Rooster or Rage Lobster by threading it onto the hook of your jig, but if you want a more finesse approach to flipping you can try smaller, more compact, small profile soft plastics or jigs. With the Right conditions, these techniques can pay off with some big bags of bass come tournament time or your next outing. When available, I like to flip soft plastics and Jigs under overhanging bushes and trees and let them jiggle. Usually a bass will take my jig or soft plastic as it falls or once it lands on the bottom and will run with it out of the vegetation, tree, or bush. A good time to target bushes and sunken trees with weighted soft plastics or jigs is during the post spawn. In the event of a cold front coming through I will down size both the weight and the size of the lure I’m fishing with. For example, if I was fishing a 5 inch Strike king rodent before the cold front then I would down size to a 3 inch Strike King rodent in the same color. Another thing I try when all else fails is flipping my lure directly up to the bank with the duckweed or algae.

Learning to fish cover and thick vegetation can be a very rewarding skill/technique and can produce big fish, but when you hit that “magical” grass bed it can be loads of fun. Sometimes, it may take a few times to find that perfect patch of vegetation, but when you do it will pay big dividends and most importantly BIG BASS.

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Basslsover, I am the editor of many of the articles submitted to BassResource. I have read your potential submission and will PM you with my recommendations in the next day or so. In the meantime, stay in school. Who knows? You may be the next Ernest Hemingway - but not yet.

^^ This is pretty cool right here. ^^

Mike, my father is a sports writer for the Associated Press and has a bunch of awards for his articles. His job is awesome. I have pictures of him interwiewing Mark Mcgwire, Johnny Unitas, etc. I have met MANY athletes, including Dominique Wilkins, Tyler Hansborough, Buster Posey, the list goes on.

My mom is the Director of Public Relations for VCU. She gets to do some really cool stuff. Just recently she was given a police badge to park in crime scenes, and pretty much do whatever she wants. The VCU Police NEED her to be at the crime scenes, and if it something interesting in the middle of the night, I can go.

I love writing and appreciate your editing for the website.

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I've attached one of the pictures for the article.........

post-30315-0-09478200-1310045718_thumb.j

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