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Explain to me why a quality Frog Rod is so expensive? Daiwa's frog rod is $475, and just about any other high end ones are $150 or higher. I understand that you want the ultimate sensitivity for finess fishing with worms but frogs in my mind you can see it. When they hit you can see it hit. You are walking the frog over pads, and looking for the strike, waiting 2 seconds to set the hook. How nice of a rod do you need?

I know I am missing something here so just want people to explain to me the reasoning to the high price.

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There is no way in this lifetime I would EVER pay $475 for a frog rod. I use a 7'3" MH Veritas ($99) an found it to be the perferct frog rod. The most important attributes I look for in a frog rod is something that is extremely light yet has guts with a soft tip. Its all marketing, guys who like Diawa and want everything they own to be Diawa will pay any amount of money Diawa or any other company puts on a rod. To me any topwater rod just needs to be light wieght, have the correct tip action with the right amount of guts without paying a premium.

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I don't fish frogs very often but when I do I use my lightest SW inshore combo that I have. 7' med spinning 8/17 with a soron 20 and 15# braid. In all fairness this rod would probably match up to a mh if it were a freshwater rod. For some it would be on the heavy side, but being mostly a saltwater angler it's a feather to me. Have yet to meet a bass that could stand up to this combo.

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I agree that the main attribute a frog rod needs is lightness and strength. I am crazy enough about froggin that I have a dedicated frog rod on deck even in winter have spent entire tournament days( 10 hours) fishing the frog. My frog rod is currently the most expensive rod on my deck but is still under $ 150. Would I spend $400 on a rod? Not while I have a bond on my house and kids in school. Would I use one if available? In a heartbeat without thinking twice.

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A good 7-7'6 rod in MH or H depending on how stout the company makes the rod is good. No need for these specific rods that companies make for $400.

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I use my Loomis 7'6" flippin stick for frog fishing. It will cast a mile and is strong enough to retrieve a stump if needed. No need for a "frog" rod.

Ronnie

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I use a 7'6 MH Veritas ($99) for hollow bodies and a Dobyns 804c (~$180 with my military discount) for buzzing toads.

That Dobyns rod is a little bit over my price point for moving baits, but the rod is so perfect for fishing small/mid sized moving baits and I use it so much, I can certainly justify the cost.

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I love froggin and had my best year ever, this year. For myself, I see no reason yet for a dedicated frog rod. I use my versitile GLX 844 and it has alway done the job. Been a pleasure to fish that rod for jigs and even light flippin.

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i've caught lots of bass this year with two different rods; one cheap 6' shakespeare and the other is my new Pfleuger President 6'6"; niether has give me a problem with frogging

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A dobyns 735 savy does the trick! They can be had for under $150 during the sales.

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Many great answers but I'm still puzzle as to why a frog rod would be an expensive rod when you actually see the fish bite. On average a crankbait rod is cheaper of all the techniques. Understandable as they are being reeled in pretty fast and you'll know when you get a strike. Worm and Jig are expensive because you want the ultimate sensitivity to feel the bottom scape and when fish bites. Just puzzled to why a rod would be pretty expensive in terms of technique when you know you got a fish.

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With respect to the $400 and above rods as already mentioned above I don't see it either other than for the reason to say you have one and it matches "x" reel. More of an enthusiast type of thing here...

If you are questioning why someone would pay over $80 or $100 for a rod that can fish frogs one of the reasons is that some anglers prefer to fish rods made by one or several manufacturers. For instance the die hard Loomis guys would seek out a "frog rod" from only the Loomis offerings even if it runs $250+... simply due to the fact they want to keep their tackle uniform. Personally I really like the dobyns series of rods as a whole and have a few from each tier of rods. The savy 735 has all the ingredients I look for in a frog rod, it has the same feel in hand (not sensitivity) as the other dobyns, and meets an important criteria for me in a rod which is a lifetime warranty!

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Many great answers but I'm still puzzle as to why a frog rod would be an expensive rod when you actually see the fish bite. On average a crankbait rod is cheaper of all the techniques. Understandable as they are being reeled in pretty fast and you'll know when you get a strike. Worm and Jig are expensive because you want the ultimate sensitivity to feel the bottom scape and when fish bites. Just puzzled to why a rod would be pretty expensive in terms of technique when you know you got a fish.

Some people want the best equipment they can use. Not everyone has a rod that is solely dedicated for frogging. A good flipping, heavy jig rod that is very sensitive, most of the time will make a great frog rod. If I am doing any kind of bottom contact technique, I want the most sensitivity as possible. I want to know exactly what my bait is doing at all times and to be able to detect the lightest pick ups and all surfaces I'm moving through.

In general, you get what you pay for in rods. I dont know about the specific rod you are talking about, but I did not realize how crisp balanced and light quality rods were until I actually bought and went out and used them. Now after feeling what the nicest rods are like, I would not be able to get the same enjoyment out of fishing as I used to with a cheap rod. Expensive rods are not absolutely necessary by any means, but they are a pleasure to fish with and the quality differences are very noticeable in my hands. 7'6'' heavy rods tend to be tip heavy, especially the cheap ones. Having a balanced rod makes a world of difference. My most expensive rods are the ones that I will be t-rigging, jigging, etc. Most heavy jig rods and t-rig rods fall into the category as being a nice frog rod in addition.

With that said, I would not drop $400-$500 on rod I am only frog fishing with, or only topwater fishing with. Like you I do not see the point if that is the only technique I will use it for. Still I would want at least a decent frog rod that has a nice tip to it and is not just a broomstick.

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I can see spending a healthy buck on a rod for quality fish or tournament action where you can make some serious money. My expense is in direct relationship to the fish I catch and what I target. I don't know about any one else but I have no problem in detecting bites, either by line feel or line watching, logs don't swim unless they are floating downstream. I grew up fishing in Michigan, bass, smallmouth, walleyes and perch, my opinion is a whole different as to what I need to catch those fish.

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In my opinion it is difficult to find a long, light, well balanced and powerful rod below a certain price point. I am willing to pay a bit more to have these attributes in my frog rod. I contrast with my cranking rods which are mostly fished tip down, I keep my frog rod tip up so a heavy and or unbalanced rod can be tiring to fish al day. I find length crucial in getting casting distance and I need the power to haul a bass + however many pounds of slop to the boat. Like I said I frog fish as much as possible. If you are only occasionally tossing one any stout rod will do. I just want to make my favorite technique as enjoyable for myself as possible.

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With respect to the $400 and above rods as already mentioned above I don't see it either other than for the reason to say you have one and it matches "x" reel. More of an enthusiast type of thing here...

If you are questioning why someone would pay over $80 or $100 for a rod that can fish frogs one of the reasons is that some anglers prefer to fish rods made by one or several manufacturers. For instance the die hard Loomis guys would seek out a "frog rod" from only the Loomis offerings even if it runs $250+... simply due to the fact they want to keep their tackle uniform. Personally I really like the dobyns series of rods as a whole and have a few from each tier of rods. The savy 735 has all the ingredients I look for in a frog rod, it has the same feel in hand (not sensitivity) as the other dobyns, and meets an important criteria for me in a rod which is a lifetime warranty!

The 735SS is a very good buzzing frog rod. Relatively soft tip and a stout back end for getting that fish up and out of the slop. I used this rod for chucking horny toads until I got my 804C. Very similar actions, but that 804 launches baits a lot further with a lot less effort.

For buzzing toads, you want a relatively soft tip, if you are doing it a lot. You'll wear your self out throwing horny toads all day with a broomstick and the soft tip helps launch the light horny toads out there. Most flipping sticks have a soft tip and do make decent frog rods, if needed.

OTOH, for hollow body toads I prefer a different action. I prefer an extra light rod with an extra fast tip (ie Veritas). This type fishing, the strikes often come on slack line and you need to move a lot of line very fast (esp if you are fishing in tall weeds/reeds). Casting distance is not as much of a factor here, as the spro type lures cast well.

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I use a 7'6 MH Veritas ($99) for hollow bodies and a Dobyns 804c (~$180 with my military discount) for buzzing toads.

That Dobyns rod is a little bit over my price point for moving baits, but the rod is so perfect for fishing small/mid sized moving baits and I use it so much, I can certainly justify the cost.

The 804c is the real deal for moving baits in cover. If it starts to get really heavy, I'll use a 736c. That thing is a frog walkin, hawg pullin monster. As much as I like the 735, I just like the stiffer 736 a little more. Takes a little getting used to the stiffer tip, but its worthwhile once you do.

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Yeah man...love the 804. I was hesitant about the "4" power on it, but it has a strong backbone. I've got four 6's, two 7s and an 8.5 in the slop on it in the past month.

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Yeah man...love the 804. I was hesitant about the "4" power on it, but it has a strong backbone. I've got four 6's, two 7s and an 8.5 in the slop on it in the past month.

See, now you're just making me jealous....

I've managed flying cross country twice, and up to manhattan three times. Fishing sounds much more enjoyable.

It definitely has more power than the 4 power makes you initially think. Once you get into the backbone it turns into just good ole power.

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Im using a dobyns coalition 704 and really liking it for hollow body frogs, little stiff for horny toads though...

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