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Looking For A Crankbait Rod Under $100

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I am looking to add a cranking rod to my collection. I do not use crankbaits that much so I do not want to invest too much money. Anywhere from 50-100 would be good. Also this is just an extra question. I fish a lot by docks so would this type of rod bee good for skipping? People talk about the soft tip needed from skipping. Or would I be better of using my med/heavy fast action rod?

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The BPS Crankin' Stick is a great option in that range ($80) and every so often goes on sale for $60 which is a fantastic value. Not sure what size crankbaits you are throwing but for small/med size baits, the M power 6'6" or 7' would be a good choice. If you need more power for heavier lures then step it up the MH.

Although the Crankin' Sticks are all listed as being Fast action, they are much closer being a Moderate action rod, IMO.

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Bass Pro's crankin' stick is supposed to be a pretty good one and it is priced at 79.99 but I think you can catch them on sale for a little cheaper.  I use a Abu Garcia Veritas Winch model.  It is a pretty decent rod.  It runs 99.00 in some stores but can be bought a little cheaper on ebay sometimes.

 

As for the other rod.. I am a big fan of a 7'MH rod. 

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The BPS Crankin' Stick is a great option in that range ($80) and every so often goes on sale for $60 which is a fantastic value. Not sure what size crankbaits you are throwing but for small/med size baits, the M power 6'6" or 7' would be a good choice. If you need more power for heavier lures then step it up the MH.

Although the Crankin' Sticks are all listed as being Fast action, they are much closer being a Moderate action rod, IMO.

I'm throwing a bunch of rattle traps ranging from 1/4 to 3/4 of an ounce. And the action is another thing. I have a 6'6" med/heavy fast rod. The BPS one is also fast but I didn't know they are basically moderate action. Thanks

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Check out a Lews laser crankbait rod...100 bucks and quite nice for the price point. I sold my mojo crankbait and bought the Lews...love it!

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The  BPS CrankinStik is a great crankbait rod. If you can wait till the spring sale you will get a much better deal.

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Veritas winch 99.99. A great graphite crankin rod! I use 2 of them on my boat.

Also the daiwa ballistic on sale at TW is a good rod. I use the mh for deep diver and it works very well.

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Wait for the BPS winter sale in January or February and pick up one of their Crankin Sticks for under $100

 

Great cranking rod. In fact, sometimes I like it better than my G. Loomis Cranking stick.

 

Go figure.

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I'm sure there are other pretty good rods in that price range...but I'm partial to the BPS Crankin' Sticks. Good value at the regular price, excellent value at the sale price.  I got four of mine on sale a few years ago for $59, and one of them on sale last year for $69.

 

gallery_25379_576_220510.jpg

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If rattle traps are the only cranks you are throwing and you also want to skip docks then you don't want a cranking rod. Yes, rattle traps with a cranking rod are great in open water but if you like ripping them off weed tops then you will need a little more back bone. The same thing with skipping docks, the tip isn't as important as the motion you use, I like fast action for skipping, you want that tip back before the bait hits the water, that isn't going to happen with a moderate cranking type rod. Now if you still want a dedicated cranking rod, Tackle Warehouse has the Quantum Tour KVD cranking rods for $70-$80 depending on which model, these are great cranking rods but they are composite made with E-glass and graphite, they are a little lighter than an all glass rod but heavier than an all graphite rod.

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If rattle traps are the only cranks you are throwing and you also want to skip docks then you don't want a cranking rod. Yes, rattle traps with a cranking rod are great in open water but if you like ripping them off weed tops then you will need a little more back bone. The same thing with skipping docks, the tip isn't as important as the motion you use, I like fast action for skipping, you want that tip back before the bait hits the water, that isn't going to happen with a moderate cranking type rod. Now if you still want a dedicated cranking rod, Tackle Warehouse has the Quantum Tour KVD cranking rods for $70-$80 depending on which model, these are great cranking rods but they are composite made with E-glass and graphite, they are a little lighter than an all glass rod but heavier than an all graphite rod.

Well mainly Rat-l-traps. I am new to fishing so that is what I have now, but I am looking to build my rod set up and will eventually be throwing a bunch of different crankbaits. An you're saying most crankrods are for open water compared to through weeds like I fish the rat-l-trap?

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I'm sure there are other pretty good rods in that price range...but I'm partial to the BPS Crankin' Sticks. Good value at the regular price, excellent value at the sale price.  I got four of mine on sale a few years ago for $59, and one of them on sale last year for $69.

 

gallery_25379_576_220510.jpg

What strength line are you using on these rods? Also which specification do you have?

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BPS has a Carbonlite rod that is for Cranking. It is a 7' Medium with a Moderate action. I don't do a lot of cranking personally, but it has worked pretty well for me when I do throw Rattle traps in the spring/fall and occasionally square bills. If you can pick it up when it is on sale for $79 its a pretty sweet deal. 

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What strength line are you using on these rods? Also which specification do you have?

 

Top to Bottom:

 

6' Medium-Light / 6lb test

7'6" Medium-Heavy / 10lb test

7' Medium / 10lb test

7'6" Medium / 10lb test

7' Medium-Light / either 8 or 10lb test

 

gallery_25379_576_220510.jpg

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Well mainly Rat-l-traps. I am new to fishing so that is what I have now, but I am looking to build my rod set up and will eventually be throwing a bunch of different crankbaits. An you're saying most crankrods are for open water compared to through weeds like I fish the rat-l-trap?

 

I understand that you are learning, and I don't want to see you waste money on something you may not get a lot of use out of so I'll try to help out with some things. Most cranking rods are going to have a parabolic action meaning the rod will have a deep flex where as a fact action rod the flex will be around 4 guides down when it won't flex much after that point, a cranking rod will flex through the blank down to the last 2 guides toward the butt of the rod. Because of this parabolic action it is had for a fish to get leverage, think of it like this, if you hook a lure on a log and you pull back hard enough one of 2 things will happen, you will either pull the lure free or you will break it off. Now hook a lure onto a whippy tree limb and then pull back hard, what happens? You pull back and you can't pop the lure free or break off because the whippy tree limb bends and flexes, that it basically thae same reason we use cranking rods, when the fish surges the rod gives to keep from pulling small treble hooks free. There are certain baits I call "tweeners", these are the square bill, the jerkbait, the lipless crank bait and topwater treble hook baits, these are baits that are treble hook baits but because of the fact that they are either brought through cover or require more backbone to work better so a lot of anglers fish them on medium power fast action rods, sort of a compromise, you keep the fast action for the added backbone but you go with a medium power which is more forgiving so you get a little added flex to help fight the fish. I do think a cranking rod would be great for you to add but if you only have 1 or two other setups you may want something different as most cranking rods flex too much to use for anything other than cranks or open water spinnerbaits so you have to watch and being that you need to be under $100 means your choices are few but as I told you, there are some good deals but this is basically going to be a one trick rod so you may want to get some more cranks in addition to the rod. The other thing is fishing from shore, you didn't mention it but if you fish from shore, you may want more versatility, something you can fish a rattle trap with as well as pitch a light jig next to a dock, if that is the case look for a medium power rod with a fast action.

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I understand that you are learning, and I don't want to see you waste money on something you may not get a lot of use out of so I'll try to help out with some things. Most cranking rods are going to have a parabolic action meaning the rod will have a deep flex where as a fact action rod the flex will be around 4 guides down when it won't flex much after that point, a cranking rod will flex through the blank down to the last 2 guides toward the butt of the rod. Because of this parabolic action it is had for a fish to get leverage, think of it like this, if you hook a lure on a log and you pull back hard enough one of 2 things will happen, you will either pull the lure free or you will break it off. Now hook a lure onto a whippy tree limb and then pull back hard, what happens? You pull back and you can't pop the lure free or break off because the whippy tree limb bends and flexes, that it basically thae same reason we use cranking rods, when the fish surges the rod gives to keep from pulling small treble hooks free. There are certain baits I call "tweeners", these are the square bill, the jerkbait, the lipless crank bait and topwater treble hook baits, these are baits that are treble hook baits but because of the fact that they are either brought through cover or require more backbone to work better so a lot of anglers fish them on medium power fast action rods, sort of a compromise, you keep the fast action for the added backbone but you go with a medium power which is more forgiving so you get a little added flex to help fight the fish. I do think a cranking rod would be great for you to add but if you only have 1 or two other setups you may want something different as most cranking rods flex too much to use for anything other than cranks or open water spinnerbaits so you have to watch and being that you need to be under $100 means your choices are few but as I told you, there are some good deals but this is basically going to be a one trick rod so you may want to get some more cranks in addition to the rod. The other thing is fishing from shore, you didn't mention it but if you fish from shore, you may want more versatility, something you can fish a rattle trap with as well as pitch a light jig next to a dock, if that is the case look for a medium power rod with a fast action.

Thanks, you really answered my question well. I have a 6' medium power spinning rod, a 6'6" med/heavy baitcaster and a 7' heavy baitcaster. Right now I am using my medium heavy for the rat-l-traps because the rod and line are strong enough to rip through grasses. I am restricted mainly to the shore so weeds and grass are a concern. Also, I fish spinner baits a lot. I am looking at the BPS Crankin Stick when it goes on sale. Those are fast action but people say they have more bend in them. Just one more question. A lower gear ration is preferable for cranking rods?

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Top to Bottom:

 

6' Medium-Light / 6lb test

7'6" Medium-Heavy / 10lb test

7' Medium / 10lb test

7'6" Medium / 10lb test

7' Medium-Light / either 8 or 10lb test

 

gallery_25379_576_220510.jpg

These seem like relatively light setups, the line at least. Are these setups strong enough to pull through weeds or are you fishing in mainly open water? 

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These seem like relatively light setups, the line at least. Are these setups strong enough to pull through weeds or are you fishing in mainly open water? 

 

All of these cranking rods are primarily intended for use with lipped crankbaits.  These baits are not typically retrieved through grass but are generally for use in open water and for bouncing off, and through, structure and hard cover elements like rocks, ledges, timber, etc.  To get the best dive depth, you generally want to use the thinnest diameter line that works with that bait, the cover/structure elements expected, the needed abrasion resistance, and the intended target species.  I only target bass in mostly open water so I can get away with 10lb test and going as low as 6lb test with some of the small/light baits. Now, all this line is Yo-Zuri Hybrid which usually has a breaking strength above it's rating.

 

Ripping out of grass is more a technique for your lipless cranks. I mostly use 10lb test for that as well, but have gone as high as 17lb test or as low as 8lb test depending on the mentioned factors.

 

This is not as complicated as it all sounds. You just have to decide the type of baits that you mostly intend to use.  If you want this new rod to be dedicated to cranking lipped cranks, of medium weight (say 1/4oz to 5/8 or 3/4oz), then get a medium power, moderate or moderate-fast action rod and a reel with a 6.x:1 ratio or lower (26 inches per handle turn or less).  Now, for lipless (and as smalljaw67 mentioned) I personally use a medium-fast or even medium-heavy fast rod if I expect grass. If no grass, you can fish lipless on your cranking rod.

 

BTW - if you end up looking at the BPS Crankin' Sticks, ignore the BPS action ratings. They list all these rods as having fast or extra-fast actions and nobody knows why. The rods they list as "fast' actually fish like moderates.  Their "extra-fast" rods fish like moderate-fast.

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All of these cranking rods are primarily intended for use with lipped crankbaits.  These baits are not typically retrieved through grass but are generally for use in open water and for bouncing off, and through, structure and hard cover elements like rocks, ledges, timber, etc.  To get the best dive depth, you generally want to use the thinnest diameter line that works with that bait, the cover/structure elements expected, the needed abrasion resistance, and the intended target species.  I only target bass in mostly open water so I can get away with 10lb test and going as low as 6lb test with some of the small/light baits. Now, all this line is Yo-Zuri Hybrid which usually has a breaking strength above it's rating.

 

Ripping out of grass is more a technique for your lipless cranks. I mostly use 10lb test for that as well, but have gone as high as 17lb test or as low as 8lb test depending on the mentioned factors.

 

This is not as complicated as it all sounds. You just have to decide the type of baits that you mostly intend to use.  If you want this new rod to be dedicated to cranking lipped cranks, of medium weight (say 1/4oz to 5/8 or 3/4oz), then get a medium power, moderate or moderate-fast action rod and a reel with a 6.x:1 ratio or lower (26 inches per handle turn or less).  Now, for lipless (and as smalljaw67 mentioned) I personally use a medium-fast or even medium-heavy fast rod if I expect grass. If no grass, you can fish lipless on your cranking rod.

 

BTW - if you end up looking at the BPS Crankin' Sticks, ignore the BPS action ratings. They list all these rods as having fast or extra-fast actions and nobody knows why. The rods they list as "fast' actually fish like moderates.  Their "extra-fast" rods fish like moderate-fast.

Thanks. I have been told or read in other places that for ripping rat-l-traps through grass that 50 lb + braid is recommended.  

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The BPS cranking stick is an under rated rod, I consider them to be very good rods so it would be a good choice. That said, the reason why you see fast and even extra fast actions listed on them is because you are getting the rating of a fiberglass rod, the cranking stick is also a composite meaning it is made with both fiberglass and graphite so they tend to run heavier than an all graphite rod. These composite rods will have a fast action meaning the same as a graphite rod, that it will flex a few guides down before the backbone therefore when tension is relieved it will rebound  "fast" to the original position, the difference is that the composite rod will flex past this point more than an all graphite rod. I know it is confusing but fiberglass and composite rods are different than their graphite counter parts. The other reason these composite rods aren't good for worm or jig fishing is they aren't as sensitive as an all graphite rod with a fast action, there are worm and jig rods with moderate fast actions that flex more but they are designed that way for use with braid as the rod will give a little bit as the line doesn't stretch but that is another discussion.  If I were you I would look at a 6'6" to 7' medium powered rod with a fast action, that would still make it stout enough to rip lipless baits out of grass but be a little more forgiving when fighting a fish but if you do want to add the cranking rod then the cranking stick would be a good one but remember, the KVD model is a composite and it on sale for cheap, it was $160 just a few short months ago, good luck on your purchase.

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Thanks. I have been told or read in other places that for ripping rat-l-traps through grass that 50 lb + braid is recommended.  

 

Different strokes for different folks... ;)

 

I don't use braid for cranking personally, but some folks do with great success.  Using braid gives you better hooksets, but increases the possibility of pulling trebles out. In this case, you are relying on the rod as the shock absorber, rather than line stretch.  For lipless, the braid certainly enhances the ability to rip out of grass...but at the expense of perhaps more lost fish.  BUT 50lb braid - sounds like overkill to me. If you've buried a lipless so deep in grass to need 50lb braid to rip it out, you will probably end up with so much grass left on the hooks that the bait will be dead (no action) all the way back on the retrieve (and this assumes you didn't break your rod while trying to rip the bait out :lol:).  The idea is to tick the tops of the grass, not bury it.

 

I just checked my records and over the last four seasons I've caught 967 fish on lipless cranks, including LMB up to 9.5lb and grass carp up to 48 pounds, with line tests between 8 and 17lbs. Works for me...

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I just got a 7'M M Ethos and I love it. Really nice for $60.

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Different strokes for different folks... ;)

 

I don't use braid for cranking personally, but some folks do with great success.  Using braid gives you better hooksets, but increases the possibility of pulling trebles out. In this case, you are relying on the rod as the shock absorber, rather than line stretch.  For lipless, the braid certainly enhances the ability to rip out of grass...but at the expense of perhaps more lost fish.  BUT 50lb braid - sounds like overkill to me. If you've buried a lipless so deep in grass to need 50lb braid to rip it out, you will probably end up with so much grass left on the hooks that the bait will be dead (no action) all the way back on the retrieve (and this assumes you didn't break your rod while trying to rip the bait out :lol:).  The idea is to tick the tops of the grass, not bury it.

 

I just checked my records and over the last four seasons I've caught 967 fish on lipless cranks, including LMB up to 9.5lb and grass carp up to 48 pounds, with line tests between 8 and 17lbs. Works for me...

That clears things up. What line strength would you recommend for pitching and flipping in heavy cover? Sorry for all the questions but I am relatively new to bass fishing. 

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That clears things up. What line strength would you recommend for pitching and flipping in heavy cover? Sorry for all the questions but I am relatively new to bass fishing. 

 

Hmmm - might be an application for 50lb braid there...and some might use 20lb mono/flouro.

 

I have no heavy cover where I fish so I can't give any recommendation based on personal experience.  You might want to start another thread with that question.

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