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RSM789

Waterproof Boat Cover

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Earlier this year, I boat a 10 ft. Pond prowler & the inexpensive boat cover for it offered by BPS.  The boat is always in the water, kept docked at my brothers house & the cover does a good job of keeping dust, dirt, birds & dew off the boat.

 

This past Friday evening, Southern California got its first rain in months.  When I went fishing Saturday morning & pulled the cover off the boat, I found that the boat had about 3" of rain in the bottom.  The cover is a one-size-fits-all & is a little billowy, so I think when the water collected on the cover, it would then leach through into the boat.  No damage is done, I used Marine Grade plywood when installing the carpeting, the trolling motor battery is in a case and I keep everything else off the floor of the boat when it is covered.  It is not a big deal to spend 10 minutes bailing out the boat in the darkness before going out, but it might be less fun as winter approaches & the water is colder.  Therefore, I am looking into a true water proof boat cover, trying to determine if they exist and if the cost is worthwhile considering what it is covering.

 

I thought the experiences of other boat owners would be more valuable than advertising claims and ratings found on product websites.  Has anyone ever found a water proof boat cover that they would recommend for a small boat like this?

 

Based on the area I live, I do realize I might be overthinking this.  If we get 30 rainy days in the next 9 months, it will be considered an extremely wet year.  More likely, there will be maybe 10-15  times I have to bail out the boat before next summer.

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I believe there are products you can spray on covers to make them waterproof.  If there is any stitching on the cover, give them a liberal coat of the spray.  Here's one.

 

http://www.boatersplus.com/star-brite-waterproof-spray-with-ptef-22-oz.html?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_content=EB-5708211&utm_campaign=bing

 

Your cover should be supported in such a way that there are no low places where water can collect.

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Your cover should be supported in such a way that there are no low places where water can collect.

This.

 

You can go out an buy some pre-made supports ($$$,) but I use an old set of re-purposed tent frame poles and it works fine. I've also seen some nice ones built out of PVC pipe.

 

Don't know if you have it on a trailer or if those type of boats have a plug, but I usually extend my trailer jack up so that the stern is lower than the bow. With the plug out, water will mostly drain as it falls into the hull. 

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This.

 

You can go out an buy some pre-made supports ($$$,) but I use an old set of re-purposed tent frame poles and it works fine. I've also seen some nice ones built out of PVC pipe.

 

Don't know if you have it on a trailer or if those type of boats have a plug, but I usually extend my trailer jack up so that the stern is lower than the bow. With the plug out, water will mostly drain as it falls into the hull. 

Yep. For under $20 of pvc pipe and fittings you can build supports

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This.

 

You can go out an buy some pre-made supports ($$$,) but I use an old set of re-purposed tent frame poles and it works fine. I've also seen some nice ones built out of PVC pipe.

 

Don't know if you have it on a trailer or if those type of boats have a plug, but I usually extend my trailer jack up so that the stern is lower than the bow. With the plug out, water will mostly drain as it falls into the hull. 

The boat is in the water, so pulling the drain plug out is not an option.  In theory, I could pull it up on to the dock to allow it to drain, but it is my brothers dock & his community has rules against storing boats on docks (typical CC&R's for Southern California).

 

I never thought of supports for the cover, that would allow eliminate the billowing effect which allows the water to collect.  I use PVC for work all the time, I see how it could be easily be used to create a skeleton to tighten up the cover.

 

Thanks for the info & advice.

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No cover is going to stay "waterproof" for very long in the Cali sun...  like they say it's all about angling the cover so water sheds off.   Back in the old days tents were just canvas.... but ceiling and walls were angled to let water find it's way to ground....   That's why they always told you not to touch the roof of the tent....  it would create a spot that would drip....

 

I just use a couple old barstools to put a peak on my roofs....

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