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Balshy Fishing

Drop Shot Weights And T-Rig Weights

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So, I'm finally learning all my knots since I finally got braid and am using leaders and all that good stuff. Regardless, I'm very curious as to the best weights for certain applications along with the line.

I'm dropshotting on braid with 12lb Flourocarbon. What's an ideal weight for that?

Also, I haven't gotten into t-rigs or Carolina rigs but how you determine your weights?

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Weight is a decision thing.  Basically, use the lightest weight that you can get away with and still feel what you want to feel.  This a rule of thumb, but there are many exceptions to this rule.    Weights are something that you have to experiment quite a bit with, to find out what you like and what you don't.  First, consider what you want the weight to do.  Drop shot weights are a good for instance.   For instance, say I want to drop shot a weed line that is 12 to 15 feet down.  Maybe it only takes an eight of an ounce weight to sink the bait that I choose to use….. Ok then, a 1/8 oz weight takes  "x" amount of time to sink to where you want it to sink to  and anchor your bait.

 

OK then, a quarter ounce weight will take less than "x" amount of time to sink , and a half ounce will take much less time.   Decision making with a tx rig type bait is similar but different because the weight is in front of your bait rather than underneath it.

 

Jika rigs are another situation.   My jika rigs are all home made.    I very seldom fish less than a 5/8 oz jika rig and I fish closer to 3/4 oz than lighter.  My reasoning is that the jika rig is a bottom rig and I want my bait to get to the bottom asap.

 

This is just me,   There aren't any right or wrong decisions - just decision that work better or less better for you.  Experimentation and paying attention are the keys to learning how to weight baits.  Hope this helps, points you in a direction to figure this out.

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 Basically, use the lightest weight that you can get away with and still feel what you want to feel.

This x2

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Thabk you!

Do you have any suggestion on a type of bullet weight? I'm gonna hit up BPS here soon. I'm not gonna order em

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Starting out my day, I usually use a heavier weight in clear water to trigger a reaction strike and a lighter weight in low visibility to keep it in the strike zone longer. Although, this is just my preference and not a rule. All this changes based on current and cover as well.

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I typically use water depth and wind as my determining factors for size of weight to use.

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This x2 Good advice - to help further I say from 1' to 15' start with 1/8th oz. drop shot weight ; if it's a bit windy then go up to 3/16th oz. These are the two most popular sizes - for deeper and / or more windy conditions don't hesitate to go up to 1/4th oz. to 1/2 oz. as required to keep contact with the bottom .

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1/8 to 5/16 oz. drop shot and bullet weights cover 90% for me. Lighter weights allow for better feel and action.

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On Carolina rigs, I use a 3/4 oz weight 95% of the time.  You want something you can throw a long way, gets to the bottom quickly, and stays there.  I'm fishing water 10 -25 ft deep most of the time.  For shallower water, you might drop down to 1/2 oz or 3/8 oz.  You can even fish a finesse C-rig (Petey rig) over shallow submergent grass with 1/8 to 1/4 oz

 

In all applications, you want a weight that gets the particular job done in the water and wind conditions you have to fish.  You have to be able to cast it, it has to sink to the depth you want to fish, and it needs just enough weight so you can feel what is happening to the bait after you get it down there.  In the end, you will have a wide variety of weights in your tackle box so you can tailor your presentation as needed. 

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Dropshot depends on wind/current/bait.  Some baits have more air drag so you might need to go a bit heavier to get your bait where you went it to go.  Also factor in wind/current to get it there and to stay put once it's there.  That doesn't mean to just stick on a 1/2oz weight and be done with it, go light as possible to accomplish how you're trying to present the bait.

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Use the weight that allows you to keep in contact with the soft plastic used.12lb FC is a little heavy for most drop shot presentations, 6 to 8 lb is common with 1/8, 3/16. & 1/4 oz drop shot weight.

T-rig with a bullet weight, the 12 lb FC is OK, the bullet for 6" to 9" worms under normal conditions, not high wind, use 31/6, 1/4 & 3/8 oz weight, 31/6 being most common, 3/8 in the wind to depths of 20'.

Sometimes the rate of fall is critical.

The next question is what type of material; lead, brass, tungsten???

Lead is the cheapest, tungsten the most expensive and smaller size, brass is in between, little larger than lead. I prefer painted brass, gives good feedback and the line slides through the hole easily on bullet weights and use 8mm glass faceted bead.

Tom

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