Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Recommended Posts

Today I went fishing with my dad. He refuses to use any thing but braid. He used 6 pound test on a baitcaster?!!?? He also like his breaking system loose. He got one bad backlash. (First year with a baitcaster) he then whipped it out very hard. His line snapped. This occurred literally 4 more times. Can someone help explain why it backslashes so easily and then the line becomes frayed? And what's the science behind backlashes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, Adleyfishes said:

Today I went fishing with my dad. He refuses to use any thing but braid. He used 6 pound test on a baitcaster?!!?? He also like his breaking system loose. He got one bad backlash. (First year with a baitcaster) he then whipped it out very hard. His line snapped. This occurred literally 4 more times. Can someone help explain why it backslashes so easily and then the line becomes frayed? And what's the science behind backlashes.

The braid test is too light for a baitcaster. You could use it but it will be extremely difficult and annoying - the line is so thin that it will bed into the spool of line. Too give you comparison in diameters - 50# braid is equivalent to 12lb flouro. 

So your dads 6 lb braid, i can't even calculate how thin that is. 

Commonly, on baitcasters - people tend to start at around 30 and above in # braid. If he wants to go that thin - a spinning reel will be far better of an option.

Birds Nests are 99% user error (my math) - there are a ton of videos out there on youtube that will help your father setup his reel properly to deter bird nests. Make sure he understands, whipping the bait is not always the best way and definitely does not get you the most distance. A solid roll cast will go just as far if not father. If he is overhanding, could be another issue as well. If the line tension is too light, the line is coming off to fast off the spool to where it is not coming off the rod quick enough, thus line overrun and bad bird nests. 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Backlashes or overruns happen when the spool turns faster that the line is going out.  Line needs to pull the spool.  When the lure hits the water you must stop the spool!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think I can add anything that hasn't already been said. I just wanted to say I've never heard of 6# braid that is incredibly small and I'm not sure why it would be needed for anything

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, riverbasser said:

I don't think I can add anything that hasn't already been said. I just wanted to say I've never heard of 6# braid that is incredibly small and I'm not sure why it would be needed for anything

It excels when you need to cast a very light lure a long distance.  Out here in CA the bass go into a feeding frenzy pushing shad schools to the surface.  You need to cast to where this happens, and you need to cast NOW.  Very light flukes are often key in this scenario.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Fisher-O-men said:

It excels when you need to cast a very light lure a long distance.  Out here in CA the bass go into a feeding frenzy pushing shad schools to the surface.  You need to cast to where this happens, and you need to cast NOW.  Very light flukes are often key in this scenario.

I can see this for spinning, but not BC.  I'd spend all my time fiddling with backlashes.  If one needs to cast a very light lure NOW, I just cannot imagine BC being the best option.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fished Suffix 832  that size but it was spooled on a baitcaster count down model. We fished gin clear water with live bait spinner rigs and live crawlers. I added a 4 foot leader to a 1/4 to 3/8 inline weight and we trolled deep water for fresh water perch.  The schools would suspend part way down in 30 to 50 foot deep water.  Those perch were in such big schools and competed for food so when they hit the rig they almost would rip the rod out of your hand.  Love me some perch bites!!! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Fisher-O-men said:

Backlashes or overruns happen when the spool turns faster that the line is going out.  Line needs to pull the spool.  When the lure hits the water you must stop the spool!

;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, riverbasser said:

I don't think I can add anything that hasn't already been said. I just wanted to say I've never heard of 6# braid that is incredibly small and I'm not sure why it would be needed for anything

Are we sure this isn't floss... LOL ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, MickD said:

I can see this for spinning, but not BC.  I'd spend all my time fiddling with backlashes.  If one needs to cast a very light lure NOW, I just cannot imagine BC being the best option.

Yep, spinning!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, riverbasser said:

I don't think I can add anything that hasn't already been said. I just wanted to say I've never heard of 6# braid that is incredibly small and I'm not sure why it would be needed for anything

I use 6# Sufix 832 on my 1000 series ultralight.  I can't imagine using it on a baitcaster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a few more tidbits. Without knowing what reel he has I would suggest that he tightens up the cast control cap up enough to eliminate side to side play in the spool. If he has magnetic brakes he should set them toward the max setting (usually the highest number on the dial or the max setting). For centrifugal breaks he needs to make sure at least half of the pins are engaged to start. Once he gets comfortable with the reel he can start backing of the brakes and loosening it up some. Also I would suggest having him learn on mono like Big Game 12 # because it is cheap and easy to replace if he has to cut it due to a backlash. The other piece of advice that helps dealing with regular backlashes is to cast out the reel a reasonable distance. Then strip additional line of the reel and place a small piece of black electrical tape on the spool. The tape will prevent any future backlashes from going any further minimizes lost line and time picking out backlashes. When he gets it figured out more and becomes comfortable with the reel he can then buy a spool a braid in the size he feels he needs. I would probably opt for something that it is around 10 -12 # diameter for most applications.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am guessing that the Dad was using #20 lb. braid with a #6 lb. mono conversion (most likely written on the factory spool label) - hence why the son saw :  " #6 lb." ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, ChrisD46 said:

I am guessing that the Dad was using #20 lb. braid with a #6 lb. mono conversion (most likely written on the factory spool label) - hence why the son saw :  " #6 lb." ...

This is incorrect sir. I do my research. To prove to you there is #6 lb braid I will give you facts from the spool."0.12mm", "1lb test dia", "6lb". I am not stupid! Mr. ChrisD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Using 6lb braid on a baitcaster is a poor idea that I cannot possibly stress enough. All backlashes are usually caused by very specific things, the end result being the spool is spinning too fast. The first problem is usually too light of a lure for the rod, and a baitcaster to begin with, the second is wind, external variables deciding they don't like you. The third, and most common is an inexperienced angler taking a lure and throwing it with a rod as hard as they possibly can, not understanding you're not going to get further with a rough jerky slam cast than a smooth controlled cast. For beginners on a baitcaster you start at 50 to 75 percent mag or central brakes. You also adjust the spool tension so that when you release the bail while holding the rod at a 45 degree angle from the ground the lure will just slowly slither to the ground. You MUST readjust this when you tie new lures on as a beginniner. After that you're just working on straight, smooth casts, while gently thumbing the spool as the line peels off. My shimano core will throw weightless flukes, worms, and ned rigs flawlessly with one central brake on and the spool tension dial nearly off entirely. I've also been fishing with this exact reel, and 20lb braid for 6 years now. (Edit notes, list wrong brake for my own reel)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    bass fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    bass fish

    fishing

    fishing poles

    fishing reels
    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×