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BigTerp

HOT river water

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Plan to fish my local river this weekend. River is low, clear and the water is starting out in the mid to high 80's and climbing into the 90's by the afternoon. Going to head out early and start fishing before sunrise and fish until late morning. Thinking of starting off with topwater and spinner baits hitting the shaded/covered banks then switching to tubes, swimbaits and finese type plastics as the temp rises targeting deeper and faster moving water. How would you guys tackle these conditions? 

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Look for areas below riffles.  Fishing for 2+ hours Saturday evening on the Potomac, I caught seven and missed one 16-incher (plus numerous other hookups on fish I didn't get a chance to see) just wading a section of riffles/rocks that stretched almost the entire width of the river (see Google Earth pic).  Water wasn't very deep.  I used a swimbait to catch three that were around 12 inches (and the miss on the 16-incher) then used a Ned Rig to catch four dinks and a catfish in about 30 minutes.  I wanted to try topwater as the sun was going down but felt dehydrated (standing in the middle of a river!) and quit.

Pat

 

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Usually, the fastest water is not that deep. I would fish the fastest water you can find, riffles or rapids   with deep water that is close by. Hot water means lower oxygen levels and fast water riffles, adds oxygen which will attract and hold bass.

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Thanks.

Patred, that area looks familiar. I think we are going to fish a little further up river at Snyders. Shouldn't have any trouble finding riffles and rocky/ledge areas with the current water level. Fished behind my house (below dam 5) Sunday afternoon for just 20 minutes or so and caught one small one right below some riffles.

That's what I was thinking regarding the faster water. Figured the deeper holes would be cooler and hold them as well. But makes sense that they'd be more apt to hang out where the oxygen level is better.

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Super low fast water will attract a lot of fish.  You're going to catch a mix, but mostly smaller fish. Deep water access or fast current in 3-5' of water (if you can find it) will hold larger fish so long as there are boulders and current breaks.  Also, pay attention to tail outs before the riffles, especially if you can find them with a submerged ledge that forces the water "up" into the riffles.  Also, pay attention to the forecast.   Any decent rain up stream or rising water will bring fish closer to shore or sitting along seams where muddy water meets clear water (creek mouth pattern, for example) This time of year, especially, pay attention to crayfish.  If you're seeing lots of them, a tube is a great first choice.  If you're not, a 3-5" grub on 1/8 oz jig is probably your most high percentage option.  Good luck!

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4 hours ago, Turkey sandwich said:

Super low fast water will attract a lot of fish.  You're going to catch a mix, but mostly smaller fish. Deep water access or fast current in 3-5' of water (if you can find it) will hold larger fish so long as there are boulders and current breaks.  Also, pay attention to tail outs before the riffles, especially if you can find them with a submerged ledge that forces the water "up" into the riffles.  Also, pay attention to the forecast.   Any decent rain up stream or rising water will bring fish closer to shore or sitting along seams where muddy water meets clear water (creek mouth pattern, for example) This time of year, especially, pay attention to crayfish.  If you're seeing lots of them, a tube is a great first choice.  If you're not, a 3-5" grub on 1/8 oz jig is probably your most high percentage option.  Good luck!

Thanks!!

We actually just got over an inch of rain in the past 24 hours. The river is on the upswing. Should be up close to a foot higher tomorrow than what it was yesterday morning, but still low. Hoping that helps the bite. 

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Caught 11 smallmouth this morning near Antietam Creek, including one 16-incher.  Three hours of fishing basically in one long section of riffles/rapids.

Pat

 

20160730_094426.jpg

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The good part about a river is that the water is always moving, supplying necessary oxygen and food supply. And most larger rivers have many underground springs rising into the main basin. I wouldn't worry about the surface temp of the water you are fishing. Just go out and enjoy! :)

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We ended up doing OK. Fishing was tough but we managed 10 in the boat. Caught them everywhere from eddies behind riffles to up against the bank. All were somewhere close to faster moving water. The bite seemed to pickup when a few showers rolled through. Ended up catching a few decent ones in the same spot right after a downpour. We got SOAKED, but it was worth it.  Biggest went just shy of 18"...

 

20160730_092304_zpsehvcuknt.jpg

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Way to go Derek, nice fish!!!!

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On 7/30/2016 at 8:00 PM, patred said:

Caught 11 smallmouth this morning near Antietam Creek, including one 16-incher.  Three hours of fishing basically in one long section of riffles/rapids.

Pat

 

20160730_094426.jpg

What were you having luck on? All of ours were on tubes. Copper color seemed to do the best.

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51 minutes ago, BigTerp said:

What were you having luck on? All of ours were on tubes. Copper color seemed to do the best.

Ten were on a swimbait and one was on a TRD Finesse worm.  The first six were all sub-10-inch "cookie cutter" fish, then I landed the 16 incher.  Then some more dinks, then the last one was 12 inches on the worm.

Pat

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Gotcha. I threw a swimbait for a little while, but couldn't get bit. Have used the TRD's on a ned head a few times with pretty good luck. I like how tough that ElaZtec stuff is.

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1 minute ago, BigTerp said:

Gotcha. I threw a swimbait for a little while, but couldn't get bit. Have used the TRD's on a ned head a few times with pretty good luck. I like how tough that ElaZtec stuff is.

Unlike everyone else on the entire freakin' planet I haven't had much luck with the Ned Rig.  I've fished it for a couple hours total and have only caught a couple fish with it. I'm going to keep trying but I think I'm cursed...

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My river conditions have been about the same but not quite to the 85-90 deg. mark yet. I start out very early and hit a couple of creek mouths with topwater. I limit my casts and don't beat it to death. Try for a few and move away to another creek. Turn to bank fishing deeper water drop offs with worms. Bigger fish have been coming with worm fishing. This has been the pattern for me the last few weeks. I feel if I were to just keep throwing crankbaits the fish will be smaller. I don't beat the water to death because I'll come back to it with a worm. Been working.

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