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CybrSlydr

Is shore fishing my issue?

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I understand that it's in the dog days of summer and the fishing typically drops off when the temps get high.  However, the number of trips I've taken and the amount of time and various lures I've attempted seems vastly disproportionate to the number of fish I've caught, regardless of the temps.

So I'm wondering - is my problem that the fish are just in a place I can't reach because I'm stuck on the shore?  I've posted pics of the lakes we've visited in my Fishing Report threads so you folks know what we're fishing - by all accounts they're great places.

I'm looking for some advice to try and up the number of fish caught per trip to something above 2 for 5.  :)

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I can't say that this summer I've caught as many shallow fish as I would in the spring or fall, but there are still plenty that are lurking around under five feet. 

When the bite is slow, you need to get slow and downsize.  I always have a rod ready with a Ned rig because if it is a spot that everything says "fish" and I'm still not getting them, nine times out of ten, I can coax them out with a Ned rig. However, you still have to put in some work. 

For example, yesterday during lunch, I went to a local pond to try out my new spinning rod which is the one I will be using for Ned rigging and small weightless plastics.  I caught five in a half hour, but every one of them bit when I was dead sticking. None of the fish wanted to chase the bait so it required a good five to ten seconds of sitting still, moving the bait a bit and repeating.....obviously with a small presentation as well.

 Look for any shade. Drag the bait to find grass. That's how I found this school. I find the grass and then toss my bait to the edge and they started hitting it.  This might not get you a trophy, but it will get you fish. 

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So would you suggest using a spinner with a Colorado/Willow leaf and slowly moving it across the bottom?  Aside from that I have the Super Flukes that will sink.  Throw a couple split-shot on the line and get 'em to go down quickly.

What about a flouro leader?  The water is pretty clear, I'm using 12lb Trilene XT in clear but I bought some SpiderWire 10lb Flouro (before I read the reviews of the stuff online... lol).

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I strongly suggest you consider bass fishing at nighttime during this time of year.That's how I been mostly bass fishing this summer and I have caught many +5 pounders this way.

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When I was fishing yesterday.....and catching fish......there was one other guy there as well and he was not catching fish.  He was using a white spinner.  I've got plenty of fish on white spinners before, but I'm telling you, if the bite is near non-existent, you are going to catch something with a Ned rig.  All you need to do is figure out the presentation they want and get in an area where fish should be hanging out. Hot summer days I always look for shade and you will find fish. 

My jigs are 1/20 oz. so they are not really sinking too fast. Many times I am certain that the fish watch them slowly drop and then when they hit bottom, they figure, what the heck, easy meal. The light weight makes it look like a natural meal. Too much weight and I feel that you might take away that tantalizing dinner bell drop.  It's like a slow walk down the buffet line for us before we grab a plate and dig in. 

The heaviest line I use on my spinning reels is eight pounds, but I really don't think that your Trilene is the biggest piece of the puzzle.  When you change line, I would drop it down a bit personally, but our "guest" rod has 12 pound Trilene on it because it gets some catfish action, and it has caught plenty of bass.  

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1 hour ago, soflabasser said:

I strongly suggest you consider bass fishing at nighttime during this time of year.That's how I been mostly bass fishing this summer and I have caught many +5 pounders this way.

This is why I like the south. There's no messing around.  Fishing in the dark in south Florida is mans work. There are any number of things that can bite, sting, or poison you running around and a few that could eat you. That my friend, is dedication.  

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28 minutes ago, Onvacation said:

This is why I like the south. There's no messing around.  Fishing in the dark in south Florida is mans work. There are any number of things that can bite, sting, or poison you running around and a few that could eat you. That my friend, is dedication.  

Thank you,I truly enjoy bass fishing and do whatever is necessary to succeed in it.Its super hot during the day right now (+90 degrees with +80% humidity ) so fishing during low light periods is best(sunrise,cloudy/rainy days, sunset, nighttime).I always keep an eye out for snakes and alligators to be safe,and fish a couple feet away from the shore.

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Ugh, I always tell people that Louisiana was what it took to make me miss Afghanistan.  If I never visit the south again, it'll be too soon.  lol

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I fish almost everyday, sometimes in the boat most of the time from the bank.  In south Florida with all the heat and intense sun fishing is often easier from the bank then the boat  In this summer pattern you have to fish slow and many bass are at drop offs where they hug the bottom close to the shallow flats.  I use senkos, trick worms and zoom flukes and if your moving the bait too fast there is no bite this time of year..  Throw it out past the depth change and let the bait slowly flutter to the bottom and just sit.  Then very slowly drag it a few feet and let it sit again.  If this doesn't work I will snap it off the bottom and let it flutter back to the bottom and just sit, up to 30 seconds.  Most of the hits happen as the bait flutters back to the bottom.  Dont use much weight, either weightless or a 1/32.  This works for me everyday and always produces fish of varies size.  Fishing from the bank you dont have to worry about the boat moving and pulling the bait,  Wind is much less of a problem from the shore.  

There are other ways to catch bass during summer, but this is a constant producer if you have confidence in the bait.  Confidence is key to bass catching success.

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I just read threw a few of your threads on the RECreation Lakes - a lot of those lakes look really small/shallow/narrow, and if you're hitting the ones by the road (easy access for all) they probably get a ton of fishing pressure.  The water looks pretty clear, are you or your brother able to see any bass?  All of those little fingerling lakes might not have bass in them either.  Have you tried Wolf Run Lake?

Being from shore can be kind of a disadvantage if you don't have full 360 degree access to the lake but if you watch the boats at any given lake most will be casting towards the banks so you're casting the same targeted water much of the time.  It's when all the boats are in the middle of the lake fishing deep where you're at a disadvantage.  As a 100% shore guy myself, I like to fish something with bottom contact so I can get a feel for the contour/depth/bottom composition of the lake, and also see if you run into any structure (bump into any boulders, get hung up on treestumps, etc).  Try to walk along as much of the shoreline as possible and try to find spots where bass will hang out - coves, dropoffs, channels, etc.  If you need to get uncomfortable in finding better spots just think of it as one more obstacle someone didn't try to get past to find a better fishing spot.  Sometimes you find nothing, sometimes you find a gem.

During the hot period I'd stick to the larger lakes where you know there's bass, and in the springtime when they start spawning and get more active, hit up some of the smaller bodies of water just to see if there's bass in them.  Use a dropshot with a small 3-4" plastic nose hooked, if there's anything swimming in the water, it should hit it.

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Im not sure about Florida but here in the North West, mid day is time for a drop-shot or a light jig head. On the drop shot, im sure yall have a lot of grass, get some of the gamakatsu glock hooks in 1/0 and t-rig anything lol and for the light jig I have always use the 4" GYCM curly tail grubs on a 1/8-1/4 jig head. Ill often drag a 1/8oz power worm too. I have never put line over 8lb on a spinning rod before... I like to run 10-15lb braid with a fluro leader... or straight braid if the water is dirty. 

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I agree with Gordo.  The water is so warm right now everywhere that if you were a bass you'd be choking for oxygen in that pea green soupy crap too and you wouldn't want to chase any food either.  The ned rig is a good idea but I've found that since its so small that it mostly targets smaller bass.  I prefer to upsize to something bigger in the soft plastic category.  It reduces the number of bites because it targets larger fish.  The ned rig doesn't work the greatest in thick weeds either although they do make a jig head with a weed guard that I have not tried yet.

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7 hours ago, blckshirt98 said:

I just read threw a few of your threads on the RECreation Lakes - a lot of those lakes look really small/shallow/narrow, and if you're hitting the ones by the road (easy access for all) they probably get a ton of fishing pressure.  The water looks pretty clear, are you or your brother able to see any bass?  All of those little fingerling lakes might not have bass in them either.  Have you tried Wolf Run Lake?

Being from shore can be kind of a disadvantage if you don't have full 360 degree access to the lake but if you watch the boats at any given lake most will be casting towards the banks so you're casting the same targeted water much of the time.  It's when all the boats are in the middle of the lake fishing deep where you're at a disadvantage.  As a 100% shore guy myself, I like to fish something with bottom contact so I can get a feel for the contour/depth/bottom composition of the lake, and also see if you run into any structure (bump into any boulders, get hung up on treestumps, etc).  Try to walk along as much of the shoreline as possible and try to find spots where bass will hang out - coves, dropoffs, channels, etc.  If you need to get uncomfortable in finding better spots just think of it as one more obstacle someone didn't try to get past to find a better fishing spot.  Sometimes you find nothing, sometimes you find a gem.

During the hot period I'd stick to the larger lakes where you know there's bass, and in the springtime when they start spawning and get more active, hit up some of the smaller bodies of water just to see if there's bass in them.  Use a dropshot with a small 3-4" plastic nose hooked, if there's anything swimming in the water, it should hit it.

We've not been off to Wolf Run - and the only bass we've seen is the one I caught (in my avatar/profile photo).  Lots and lots of panfish though (we call them A-hole Fish because they follow the lure but never bite, just tease us). 

From what I've read, those lakes are all great for fishing and are stocked by AEP.  For instance, the lake with the green railing on the right?  There was a guy in a float tube out there tonight with a bass on his line.  So we know they're in there, we just can't entice them.

I recently purchased some Super Flukes with #3/0 hooks, so I'll be utilizing them as well - a couple of split shot and they'll sink nicely (jerry-rig Texas rig lol).  I've also got a couple spinners that haven't really done me much good yet aside from almost getting caught/lost. 

 

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Very likely, for several reasons -and more so in summer. Shore fishing is greatly limited in terms of water you can cover. High water temps can move fish deeper, and make shallow fish more apt to feed at opportune times -early AM, at night, and under deep overcast.

Even in the smaller waters I fish, I find that bass generally move away from shorelines in summer. When shore fishing then, I have a couple long casting rigs -large capacity spinning reels and long rods- to throw out away from the shoreline. But, nothing beats a boat.

Lastly, if you feel you are beating a dead horse -move! Try different locations, or a diff water body altogether.

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I fish AEP quite often and there's quality bass in almost every lake/pond.  A couple things to keep in mind: The lakes closest to the roads are highly pressured and can be more difficult to catch bass in and the water is very clear so use flurocarbon and natural color lures.  

My top producers there are hollow body frogs, tubes (t-rigged and fished very very slow), shakey heads, and 4" weightless t-rigged senkos.

 Bring a machete because, as you've probably already figured out, fishing from shore is a challenge with the abundance of briars.  I look like I've been fighting with hundreds of feral cats after spending a weekend there.

Also, Google Earth is key when fishing the recreation lands.  Find your target ponds prior to going and save a screen shot before arriving since cell service is spotty at best.

If you want, PM me and I'll point you in the right direction of some good spots.

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