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Overburdening a reel?

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I recently got a two ounce extra deep diving crankbait. I was wondering at what point I'd need to use a bigger, more powerful reel. I currently use a BPS pro qualifier in a low, 5.2:1 gear ratio. This reel has been great for my deep cranking needs with more conventional lures (6xds, etc ). What weight or lure resistance tells you that you need to step up your reel?  

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I'd say you'll be just fine with that reel. I don't think there is a set weight that requires a more expensive reel. As long as you have the line capacity, That you're happy with I'd say let er rip tater chip

I'd say you'll be just fine with that reel. I don't think there is a set weight that requires a more expensive reel. As long as you have the line capacity, That you're happy with I'd say let er rip tater chip

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I've burned out some reels, so that's a good question. If it's hard to retrieve your lure, you can strip drag with a hard yank, or you can cast out your entire spool, you should go with a bigger reel. Note that something like a big swimbait might not show the first two symptoms, but you can still wreck a small reel if you backlash and your lure doesn't break off.

 

In your case, a 2 oz crankbait is about the size of a Depth Raider, which is an average-sized but hard-pulling musky lure. Most musky guys I know use a 400-500 sized Shimano reel for that.

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Your reel should hold up fine in the mean time, however, you're going to need a specific rod for throwing a 2oz crankbait (I'm assuming you bought a 10xd). Your standard cranking rod that you're using for your 6xd's isn't going to cut it here. 

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Throwing oversized cranks for any extended period is a test for both gear & the angler alike.

And doing it on anything other than a lower gear ratio reel is not something I'd recommend.  

As noted above this is a 'technique' that will definitely benefit from the right rod, reel & line to get the most out of it.

Fishing these bigger baits can test any angler's commitment regardless of the gear but when you're sticking fatties - at it's worth it.

 

( and just for a size reference - that top bait is a 6XD)

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:smiley:

A-Jay

 

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God love you guys, that can do really deep divers all day.  These bones can't take it. The deepest I can go is 22 feet and that's Don seldomly 

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I had a much cheaper reel that I used often for fishing a 1/2oz chatterbait. That chatterbait thumps like a helicopter engine on the end of your line. I used the heck out of that thing one spring since it seemed to be the only thing that they'd hit in cold, muddy, water. After 2-3 months, the reel just wasn't smooth anymore. I even had it professionally cleaned, it just still feels less smooth than it did prior to that one stretch of spring. I don't know, maybe it just barely wore out the gears enough to throw off tolerances, who knows? It wasn't a high end reel or anything, and it was a 7:1.1, so I'm not all that surprised. But yes, I'd say from personal experience you can probably overburden a reel if you don't use the correct gear ratios or have good quality stuff, it can happen

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