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Eric Buys

Newbie Baitcaster Backlash (I know)

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First off I've done some research on how to fine tune a baitcaster but I'm obviously missing something. I'm brand new to baitcasters. Its a 6:3:1 ratio on a 7' rod. I have 10 lb braid on it (maybe that's where i messed up?). I just can't seem to go more than a 5-7 casts without a backlash no matter what type of lure. I've watched some videos and read articles but I must be missing something. Just looking for any tips or tricks. I'm sure you guys are sick of hearing from the newbie baitcasters but I'm desperate lol.

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well first off dont throw the rod when getting agitated. i have and it dont help at all what i have to do with a new baitcaster is i have to tighten down my cast control on the right of the reel. then lighten the magnetic break to half. then work from there. i will either lighten the spool tension or the magnetic break. by one or two clicks. dont go crazy and do all the way.

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Welcome aboard, Eric!

 

First of all, 10# test is on the light side.

 

That said, I caught my PB on a baitcaster with 10# Fireline

plus a 10# leader...it can be done. BUT it is not optimal.

 

Most here will recommend 30# - 50#. I actually jumped up

to 20# on my BC. The smaller the diameter braid, the greater

the tendency for it to dig in to the spool - especially after you

catch a fish, hoist a snagged limb, etc.

 

So if you use lighter braid (smaller diameter) you must be 

aware of this fact and after you bring in a fish or snagged

object, you'll want to pull a measure of line back out, then

reel back in.

 

The larger the diameter, the less digging in is a problem.

 

As well, try the electric tape trick. Cast a lure out as far as

you can cast it, (assuming no backlash), and cut a piece of

electrical tape and put it on the spool. Firm it down, then reel

back in. Now if you have a backlash, it'll only go as far as the

tape and not ruin the whole reel.

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Thanks for the replies. After doing some more research I think you're right Darren. 10# is way to light. Makes sense because I could see it digging in and it only got worse as the day went on. Gonna try 30 or 40# and see how that goes. Thanks for the help!

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You  might  try an inexpensive mono until you get the hang of it . 12 lb big Game would be a good choice .

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Not sure what kind of reel you are using but here is my best advice.  Cheap reels will lead to a very, very miserable learning experience for baitcaster.  Never completely take your thumb off the spool, this will take practice and a lot of focus. Don't go for distance.  Until you learn to fine tune your thumb, focus on easy controlled casts, I find side arm to be the easiest.  Lastly, don't start off with light lures or spinner baits, start with a weight, a jig, or a Texas rig 3/8ish ounce weight.

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Yup, it’s the braid. Don’t go any lighter than normal 10# mono, period, unless you feel like blowing your money, lol. 

 

After you get proficient and still want to go with braid, stick with at least 30# braid as the minimum, but you’d be much happier from 40# up. 

 

Two other things:

1) don’t practice with anything lighter than 1/2 oz — use just lead; no need to waste a lure. If you have to use a lure, refrain from using lures, less aerodynamic for practice. 

 

2) learn to properly load the rod with your weight and make sure you stop the spool from spinning with your thumb before the end of the line hits anything. 

 

That is it. 😎

 

 

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Yup stick with islandbass' recommendations.  Only thing I would change is to use 40# braid or heavier to start.  I purchased a used baitcast reel that came with 30# Ghost.  First thing I had to do was spend a little time getting the "dig ins" out.  I haven't had a problem with it since, but every so often I make sure the line is on tight.  I've never ever had a problem with 40# and it was the first braid I tried.

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My son was home over the 4th and we went to catch a few, and coming from a background of using only spinning gear wanted to try my casting rod Texas rigged with 1/8 sinker. WE tightened the spool tension knob and told him don't whip it and start slow. His first cast where short 10-15' or so and worked on his thumb. Loosened tension knob little by little and within a short time was getting more than enough distance and landing fish. A couple hours went by and never did get a birds nest just some loose line occasionally.

The reel he was using had 10# braid , Heaver line maybe easier to manage but not necessary. Tighten brakes, start slow and train that thumb.

Good luck!

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10 hours ago, Eric Buys said:

Thanks for the replies. After doing some more research I think you're right Darren. 10# is way to light. Makes sense because I could see it digging in and it only got worse as the day went on. Gonna try 30 or 40# and see how that goes. Thanks for the help!

You'll have much better luck with a larger diameter braid. Not like 30 or 40lb braid has a large diameter anyways.

 

Don't forget to use the force.....Your thumb! Once you get the thumb action down you can back off on the controls and work on distance and accuracy. 

 

Baitcasters can be intimidating at 1st for newbies. I'd suggest just sticking to a single lure type/weight until you get the hang of it. Something like a 1/2 lipless crankbait or similar....Doesn't have to be the same brand/color as it's more about the weight and how it reacts in the air, etc.

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I basically just went through this but ill drop my 2 cents from what i learned from others here.

    First i put on a heavy weight and put the breaks on 3/4 of the way on. Then i tighten down the cast control knob until the weight fell really slow. I casted that way until i felt comfortable and slowly would adjust the settings. 

    I was used to casting side arm with spinning gear but found that with the baitcaster that it was easier for me to go overhand when casting.

    And of course practice, practice and practice. I spent about a month of casting a weight in my backyard before i brought it to the water lol. It will get easier. I had plenty of thoughts of giving up and just sticking to spinning gear but it will be worth it. Also make your thumb love the spool and never want to leave it. 

 

 

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