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MSPbass

flippin' from a Pontoon

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I know this is sort of a "rods & reels" topic, but I wanted to post here to get the attention of fellow tube and 'tooners.

I often fish from an Outcast Cougar and want to learn to flip from it this season. I'm wondering if folks use traditional flippin' rods from their pontoons. I know I need a H to XH rod. I'm sitting so close to the water there's not much leverage there, so it needs to be strong. I almost pulled the trigger on an expensive flippin' stik the other day, but (somehow) showed restraint, as I was worried about its size. I'm the sure the longer length is useful, but does all that handle get in the way? Is a 7'6 rod too much to handle from a pontoon? (no pun intended.) There's no casting platform on the Cougar. It's also a foot longer that the rods I usually carry on my boat, so I'm a bit intimidated.

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Maybe I'm totally wrong here but I would say you're wasting your time. Flipping involves using the rods length and stiffness to basically underhand the bait. Okay you knew that, the point I'm making is how can you possibly do that without standing? Granted from a tall pedestal seat on a regular bass rig you could probably stick it but you're pretty much in a glorified lounge chair lol and I can't envision you being able to get much power out of a flip from that position.

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Ha! That could very well be the case here dude. But folks do it. Maybe not as far as if you were flipping from a boat deck, but they do it. I'll also ignore the lounge chair comment, except to suggest you try out a kick boat if you ever get the chance. You test the water, the bass and your skill as an angler a lot differently when you're up close like that. There's not much lounging either, I assure you.

The thing with these pontoons is that you get so close to to the fish a precise and quiet presentation is often a requirement. I'm hoping a flip cast can provide that. I basically do a half-assed flip as it is now. That's why I want to learn to do it right; really pull some line out and teach my wrist how to move. I know I won't get as much swing in my line; The space between the rod tip, the water and my body is a lot smaller. That's why I thought a longer rod would work best, but I'm not sure. Hoping someone who does it can offer some pointers.

P.S. Like I said at first, you may be right on this. Either way, thanks for the input.

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I've used 7'6 and 8ft rods from a pontoon with no problem. Might take a bit of getting used to, but you can do just about anything from a toon.

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i looked over some of the photos from the inflatable post. you could consider dropping a cut piece of plywood across the toons and have it come up to your seat, then raise your seat with a 13" riser.

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You'll be fine. I flip all the time from my pontoon and catch fish. I don't like short rods, so most of my rods are 7ft and over. It also helps when you put your feet on the foot rests and use that as leverage to set the hook. If you haven't yet, make a rod holder for your pontoon. It helps alot. You can either make or buy a standing deck though. I still want to make one for mine, but haven't gotten around too it. Get yourself either a MH or H rod, depending on how heavy of cover you are fishing. I'd recommend a 765 or 766 powell or dobyns (the new dobyns are top of the line). If you are on a budget, daiwa, shimano, bass pro shops, and quantum all make decent rods for a much lower price than a high quality stick. Although, I must say, its nice having the nicest rod you can afford. You'll enjoy the added sensitivity,lightness, and overall quality of the rods. Also, I bought a seat riser from walmart that works great. It gets you much higher for more leverage.

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I'd never thought about raising the seat. I'm definitely going to look into that. My Outcast has a seat that secures, pretty much, like a regular boat seat. I have a swivel between the frame and the seat already; adding a pedestal would be easy.

Thanks for all the help everyone!

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Another thing that helps is when you set the hook, kick your self away from the fish and move your weight back. If that makes any sense. But it helps. Flippin from a toon may not be as good as it would be if you were in a boat, but its cool being able to go where boats can't go and you are right there in the fishes habitat.

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I had a miserable time flipping in my toon till I stepped up and bought a 7 ft. 9 in. carrot stick. I put my smooth as silk curado on it and in no time I was flipping like a pro!

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Flipping is one on my favorite ways to fish from the kayak.  I found that the traditional method doesn't work too well, it puts the bait inches from my face while sitting so low.  I use a side arm motion to swing the bait and feather the spool to drop it in nice and easy.  Since you are sitting so close, the bait skimms the surface and doesn't get any elevation to "crash" into your target.  

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I've never worried about hooking myself in the face...until now! :-? Good tip though.

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You don't need any special rod to achieve a flip cast, though a longer rod can give you more reach or allow you to fish deeper.  Pitching is a different story.  You do want a heavy power rod for heavy cover.  I pitch and flip from my yak, both seated and standing.  You really can sneak right into the heaviest slop with the fish.

jig bass on a flip

362186363_aNoT4-S.jpg

pitching from the yak

354586387_MYPi2-S.jpg

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I've spent many, MANY hours practicing pitching while sitting down.  I fish from a pontoon quite a bit and I can actually pitch further and with better accuracy sitting down now than I can standing up.  When pitching from a standing position, most anglers start with the lure about even with the reel.  When pitching sitting down, I start with the lure much higher up the rod.  (less line between the lure and rod-tip)  The way I hold the rod is much different, to prevent the lure from hitting the water in front of me.  

I'm just gonna have to make a video to show this, I'm not describing it well.  I'm sure some of you do it the same way.  

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I've never tried from my pontoon, but I have from my ODC420 Tube (sort of in between a traditional tube and a pontoon).  I was able to do it after practice, but the limiting factor for me was the length of the rod butt interfering with my lap/belly.  I like to use 7'-7'6" rods while float tubing just for the added leverage, but finding one that does not have a really long butt section is difficult.  The best compromise I've found is a BPS Extreme MH 7' casting rod, and that seems to work ok.  The nice thing is that from a tube you can be practically on top of a fish and still be successful. I've had them swim directly below me and not spook, that and the occasional pike actually coming up between my legs and nail a bait laying in the water!  

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A video would be awesome.

And thanks for all the tips. It sounds like there's no need to fear a long rod. (Don't make that dirty anyone.) I'd probably end up throwing frogs into thicker junk if I had a beefier rod too, so it would be multi-purpose.  I'm thinking of, at least, 7' and H and adding a pedestal seat to the Outcast frame. I like that plan!

It's really nice to be able to think things out-loud like this, so to speak. The feedback from everyone here is so helpful.

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Yeah dude, the seat riser works. The only thing is it makes it hard to kick( I am 6'1" too), and I am not sure if you can still row. When I put the seat riser on, I also put my trolling motor on. I always switch in between setups with my toon. I just want to make a dang standing deck though. I think that would be sick. Haven't used my toon that much since I got a 12 foot aluminum boat though.

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I don't use fins anyhow. I prefer the oars and throw out a little anchor when I don't want to float along too fast. I thought about how it would change rowing already too. I was wondering if the oars would be hitting my knees if I was sitting higher up. We'll see, 'cuz I'm definitely going to put one on and try it out.

I have a little 11' jon too, but I don't have a pick-up and the pontoon is so much easier for me to transport. And with the Cougar being a quad pontoon, I have a lot of flat space for storage. I just can't stand up.

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Looks like some prime frogging water....
That bottom pic is a awesome shot! Looks like bass heaven.

Actually, its just "prime location" for a photo shoot.  About the only thing in these stagnant backwaters in the middle of summer are bowfin and turtles.  The bottom is that slimy, black, anaerobic mud.  My main purpose for being up that creek was to scout out some prime Northern Pike spawning areas for this spring.

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I've never tried from my pontoon, but I have from my ODC420 Tube (sort of in between a traditional tube and a pontoon).  I was able to do it after practice, but the limiting factor for me was the length of the rod butt interfering with my lap/belly.  I like to use 7'-7'6" rods while float tubing just for the added leverage, but finding one that does not have a really long butt section is difficult.  The best compromise I've found is a BPS Extreme MH 7' casting rod, and that seems to work ok.  The nice thing is that from a tube you can be practically on top of a fish and still be successful. I've had them swim directly below me and not spook, that and the occasional pike actually coming up between my legs and nail a bait laying in the water!  

Okuma and Lamiglas make rods specifically designed for kayak fishing.  Floating and short butt rods are available.

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