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sundog49

Need tips on throwing baitcaster.

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Just got a baitcast setup. Quantam Code reel with flipin switch and a Quantam 7 foot tournament series rod medium fast. How's the best way to avoid backlash? I have it set so the bait falls slowly when the thumb button is pushed in. How much does thumb pressure on the spool come into play when I cast? ;)

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Here is the short version...

Turn the dial (magnetic brake) on the side to 0. Tighten the knob by the handle (spool tension/cast control) so that the lower slowly falls. Turn the dial to 6.  You should not need very much thumb at all like this.

Go practice. When you think you can, turn the dial to 3. Don't turn it to less than 3 this year.

Next year, experiment with the dial on 0 and less spool tension.

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When I first started to learn how to throw baitcasters, I bought a service spool - 3000 yards of 17 pound test.  When I got a bad backlash, I just cut it out and put on more line.  I needed nearly all of it my first year.  You might want to do that.

Option B would be to buy several more reels of the same model you've got now.  You get a bad backlash, just swap out reels and change the line later.

I sympathize with your situation, just know that everyone who fishes with bait casters has gone through the same learning curve you're experiencing now.

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Pay particular attention to the wind.  If you're casting into it or at an angle into it, turn up the magnets.  The reason being that the wind resistance slows your bait down so you need the spool to slow down too.  That's what causes backlashes is the spool spinning faster than the line is going out.

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One other suggestion is to spool out line that will be slightly longer than your longest cast.  Put some electrical tape on the spool/line right there, then go practice.  It will prevent your backlashes from being any deeper than that.

On the positive side your skills at clearing a backlash are about to improve substantially... ;)

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Thanks for all the tips. You've all given me some good ones. I guess the thing to do is get out and practice. Got to do it before the oil slick gets down here. 8-)

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Another thing to consider, especially if you've been using spinning gear...you'll need to change your release point slightly when using baitcasters. The release should be slightly earlier that it is with spinning tackle. The proper release will not only help reduce backlashes, it will improve you casting distance as well.

Tom

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Another thing to consider, especially if you've been using spinning gear...you'll need to change your release point slightly when using baitcasters. The release should be slightly earlier that it is with spinning tackle. The proper release will not only help reduce backlashes, it will improve you casting distance as well.

Tom

Thanks for that tip!  Like the OP, I'm just trying to learn a baitcaster, and I think that's a big part of my problem.  I've cut down on the backlashes a bit, but accuracy is TERRIBLE!!!

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i'm new with a baitcaster too.  i learned pretty quick though.  mono doesn't help with noobs on baitcaster.  it's a mess to untangle.  braided line helps me clear up the tangles easier. 

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Start out lobbing the bait until you get your release time down. Don't go for distance right away, work your way into it slowly.

Don't forget the rod is a critical part of the equation here. If it can't load the bait properly, it will make casting very difficult and the reel usually gets all of the blame. Pay attention to the lure weight ratings on the rod.

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Start out lobbing the bait until you get your release time down. Don't go for distance right away, work your way into it slowly.

Don't forget the rod is a critical part of the equation here. If it can't load the bait properly, it will make casting very difficult and the reel usually gets all of the blame. Pay attention to the lure weight ratings on the rod.

Very true. Depending on whether you are practicing on land or water, use a lure or lead weight that is on the upper limit for your rod. If rod is rated for 1/4-5/8 oz., try using at least a 1/2 oz. weight. Lighter lures are harder to throw.

At least that is what worked for me in the beginning. I'm also a relative beginner. Got my first baitcast reel in Feb., I think. Not having any problems casting now except for accuracy still not being anywhere near as good as it is with spinning, but I'll get er there! ;D ;D

Best piece of advice I can give you is if you are getting more backlashes than you should be, turn up the spool tension. I can throw a lure without using my thumb when the tension knob is set correctly. No backlashes either unless the lure hits something like a fence while halfway to its target. Probably can figure out how I know that. ;D

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In calm conditions, I only use my thumb in the very beginning of the cast to slow down the initial spool speed a little bit, and then again when the bait hits the water.  In windy conditions, or a bait that is going to have some drag moving through the air (A t-rigged worm has little resistance, and is easy to cast.  A jig with a big skirt and trailer will be harder to cast, because there's more wind resistance) you'll want to use some  more thumb.

But to answer your question about the best way to avoid backlash?  Lots of practice, patience of a saint, and a true desire to learn to use your new reel.  If you don't want to do these things, it will be a slow, painful process.  Took me a solid 7 hours of casting practice to be able to cast consistently without backlash.  May not seem like much, but go try it lol. 

Once you learn the release point, which like said is a little different than spinning, you'll become much more accurate.  What's great about a casting reel is you can throw out a bait, and use your thumb to slow it down and hit your target very precisely.  People like to point out that you can also do this with a spining reel, but it's much easier on casting gear.

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