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FL_Sharpshooter

Flip/Pitch Rod/Reel?

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I'm looking for a baitcaster to use for flipping/pitching.  I've come to really like using this technique, as I use it often.  The only problem is that I'm forced to use this on a Shakespeare 7ft rod with a spinning reel.  I have a Shimano Coriolis 100 rigged on a shimano 6'6 rod, but just can't seem to get it tuned correctly for a nice release.  It's probably just because its a bad reel/rod combo.  Any advice on a good selection for this?  I don't really have a budget, just whatever is nice.

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I use a Shimano Crucial 7'6" MH Flippin Stick (CRCX76MH) with a BPS Pro Qualifer in 7.1:1 gear ratio.  I've been excessively happy with this rod.  Handles punching mats, to frog fishing, texas rigs and jigs.  Has a great tip on it.  That combo will run you around 275 bucks at regular retail price.  The PQ's frequently go on sale so you can save a few bucks if you keep your eyes open.

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I use a Shimano Crucial 7'6" MH Flippin Stick (CRCX76MH) with a BPS Pro Qualifer in 7.1:1 gear ratio. I've been excessively happy with this rod. Handles punching mats, to frog fishing, texas rigs and jigs. Has a great tip on it. That combo will run you around 275 bucks at regular retail price. The PQ's frequently go on sale so you can save a few bucks if you keep your eyes open.

Is that the one you used in your peacock video?  It looked pretty nice.  $275 doesn't seem too bad, I can probably get it a little cheaper if I look around online.  Thanks for the suggestion.  Seems like I am partial to Shimano, I don't know why.

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No, that was a different Crucial.  Thats the 6'10" MH (CRCX610MH).  Both rods have an extra fast action.  The Flippin Stick has a beefier blank and a little more of a parabolic bend on it.  The smaller rod is a fantastic texas rig and jig rod.  It handles moderate cover fairly well, the tip isn't nearly as forgiving as the flippin stick in thicker cover though.  The deeper bend on the flippin stick helps to keep fish hooked better.  You tend to not rip hooks out nearly as much.  Both of them are great rods though.

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No, that was a different Crucial. Thats the 6'10" MH (CRCX610MH). Both rods have an extra fast action. The Flippin Stick has a beefier blank and a little more of a parabolic bend on it. The smaller rod is a fantastic texas rig and jig rod. It handles moderate cover fairly well, the tip isn't nearly as forgiving as the flippin stick in thicker cover though. The deeper bend on the flippin stick helps to keep fish hooked better. You tend to not rip hooks out nearly as much. Both of them are great rods though.

Sounds like a nice setup, I like the extra fast action.  Sounds like I would be better off with the longer rod, because I mainly fish canals with very thick moss and coverage. Just curious, but what kind of line do you usually run on it?

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Using a baitcaster to flip and pitch means you will have to practice in your yard to get the technique to the level you need in order to be successful.

Put a metal bucket or a paper plate on the ground and walk about 20 to 30 feet away.

Using your baitcaster, after balancing it with the bait, flip and pitch to the bucket or plate and then practice, practice, practice and practice.

I usually use a spinning rig with a 2500 Shimano reel on a 7 foot rod with 8 pound fluorocarbon line to pitch and flip.

It is easier to flip and pitch with a spinning rig than using a baitcater and you don't have to worry about backlashes.

I consider flipping and pitching as a "finesse" technique while I sue baitcasters "heavier baits or power fishing."

Get Denny Brauer's DVD or book, Jig Secrets to Hugh Catches! - "Advanced Flipping, Pitching and Jigging" and learn from one of the best pros.

Or Google and YouTube flipping and pitching to see how the pros do it.

If you do use a baitcaster to flip and pitch may I suggest placing a few strips of either Scotch Tape or electrical tape over your spool after you decide how much line you will need to flip and pitch. By doing this you will stop the backlashes from going deeper than the tape will allow.

Good luck.  :(

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Using a baitcaster to flip and pitch means you will have to practice in your yard to get the technique to the level you need in order to be successful.

Put a metal bucket or a paper plate on the ground and walk about 20 to 30 feet away.

Using your baitcaster, after balancing it with the bait, flip and pitch to the bucket or plate and then practice, practice, practice and practice.

I usually use a spinning rig with a 2500 Shimano reel on a 7 foot rod with 8 pound fluorocarbon line to pitch and flip.

It is easier to flip and pitch with a spinning rig than using a baitcater and you don't have to worry about backlashes.

I consider flipping and pitching as a "finesse" technique while I sue baitcasters "heavier baits or power fishing."

Get Denny Brauer's DVD or book, Jig Secrets to Hugh Catches! - "Advanced Flipping, Pitching and Jigging" and learn from one of the best pros.

Or Google and YouTube flipping and pitching to see how the pros do it.

If you do use a baitcaster to flip and pitch may I suggest placing a few strips of either Scotch Tape or electrical tape over your spool after you decide how much line you will need to flip and pitch. By doing this you will stop the backlashes from going deeper than the tape will allow.

Good luck. :(

Pretty funny you mentioned the bucket thing. I was doing this 2 weeks ago in my front yard with my Shimano baitcaster, just getting the feel of it. It's really too sticky for my liking, probably needs greased or something... who knows. My neighbor was driving by and said, "Hey, there's no fish in there!" It was pretty funny. Yeah, I've noticed that with the spinning gear, it is way easier to flip and pitch with it, and I can be VERY accurate as well. My spinning gear is nothing fancy either, just a shakespeare rod and reel rigged with 20# power pro.  Matter of fact, that 2lb 15oz in my avatar there was caught from that technique. I was using a Stike King bitsy flip with a 3-1/2" tube on it. I've watched several videos on the technique as well, so I think I've got the raw materials, I just need the appropriate gear for the job. Thanks for your response, I really appreciate it.

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No, that was a different Crucial. Thats the 6'10" MH (CRCX610MH). Both rods have an extra fast action. The Flippin Stick has a beefier blank and a little more of a parabolic bend on it. The smaller rod is a fantastic texas rig and jig rod. It handles moderate cover fairly well, the tip isn't nearly as forgiving as the flippin stick in thicker cover though. The deeper bend on the flippin stick helps to keep fish hooked better. You tend to not rip hooks out nearly as much. Both of them are great rods though.

Sounds like a nice setup, I like the extra fast action. Sounds like I would be better off with the longer rod, because I mainly fish canals with very thick moss and coverage. Just curious, but what kind of line do you usually run on it?

I use 40lb braid on the longer rod. I've never broken it. There have been times when I've questioned it. I may bump it up to 50 or 65 one of these days.

On the shorter rod is 30lb braid.

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What type of structure are you gonna flip into..? Tullies, laydowns, stick ups..ect..? If your gonna toss a bait into even heavy weeds, I would suggest using braid, at least 50lbs or more, you stand a much better chance at..1 pullin the fish out of the slop, and 2..if you happen to get snagged, your more likely to get your bait back.

As for the rig, most of it is personal preference. I prefer a 7'6" to 8' rod. One of mine is a Inshore Shimano Calcutta, rated 1/2 to 2ozs. I have a Chronarch with 55 lb samuri braid. The other doubles as my swimbait rig/flippin rig..Dobyns 807mag, rated to 8oz lures. I either use the Chronarch, or the Shimano Castaic reel, again 55lb braid, no leader, unless I'm in shallow clear water.

You can do shorter in rod length, and you don't need a real spendy reel, although I find I enjoy flippin, and pitchin with the Chronarch, more than my other reels, which include a Curado.

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No, that was a different Crucial. Thats the 6'10" MH (CRCX610MH). Both rods have an extra fast action. The Flippin Stick has a beefier blank and a little more of a parabolic bend on it. The smaller rod is a fantastic texas rig and jig rod. It handles moderate cover fairly well, the tip isn't nearly as forgiving as the flippin stick in thicker cover though. The deeper bend on the flippin stick helps to keep fish hooked better. You tend to not rip hooks out nearly as much. Both of them are great rods though.

Sounds like a nice setup, I like the extra fast action. Sounds like I would be better off with the longer rod, because I mainly fish canals with very thick moss and coverage. Just curious, but what kind of line do you usually run on it?

I use 40lb braid on the longer rod. I've never broken it. There have been times when I've questioned it. I may bump it up to 50 or 65 one of these days.

On the shorter rod is 30lb braid.

Seems like pretty heavy braid to be running, but if you can get away with it, then that's good. Thanks for letting me know.

I use a powell 765 MH flipping rod with a shimano curado 7:1 ratio reel. This has worked well for me so far.

I'll have to look into those curados more, I've heard good things about them.

What type of structure are you gonna flip into..? Tullies, laydowns, stick ups..ect..? If your gonna toss a bait into even heavy weeds, I would suggest using braid, at least 50lbs or more, you stand a much better chance at..1 pullin the fish out of the slop, and 2..if you happen to get snagged, your more likely to get your bait back.

As for the rig, most of it is personal preference. I prefer a 7'6" to 8' rod. One of mine is a Inshore Shimano Calcutta, rated 1/2 to 2ozs. I have a Chronarch with 55 lb samuri braid. The other doubles as my swimbait rig/flippin rig..Dobyns 807mag, rated to 8oz lures. I either use the Chronarch, or the Shimano Castaic reel, again 55lb braid, no leader, unless I'm in shallow clear water.

You can do shorter in rod length, and you don't need a real spendy reel, although I find I enjoy flippin, and pitchin with the Chronarch, more than my other reels, which include a Curado.

I fish a canal that is full of heavy topwater and submerged moss, but every now and then I get the opportunity to fish the river. I usually fish by submerged trees as well. I've been running 20# power pro braid on my spinning rod/reel, and I've NEVER broken the line. I do get caught in moss every now and then, but I'm always able to pull out of it. Everyone once in a great while when I feel and see a bigger bass on my line, he will bury himself in the moss close to the bank. I usually have a long net handy for that. I've heard to use power pro with #'s ~20, and anything beyond 30# to go with sufix. 8' is a pretty long rod, but I guess that gives you more control? I generally don't flip very heavy jigs, I generally use Strike King's bitsy flips. I'll check out that Shimano Calcutta too and let you know what I think of it, thanks.

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We use seemingly heavy braid on baitcasting set-ups because the important factor is the line diameter, not the pound test rating.  Braid is much easier to manage in diameters equivalent to the average 12 to 17 pound monos (at least 0.014" or so.) I don't measure with tiny calipers, I just take their word for it.  Translated to braid, this may be 40 or 65 lb. test. 

The same is true for spinning reels, it is just noticeable on casting reels because the test rating seems so high.  Most use somewhere in the neighborhood or 20 lb. braid on their 2500 size spinning reels because it is about the same diameter as most 6 lb. monos.

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We use seemingly heavy braid on baitcasting set-ups because the important factor is the line diameter, not the pound test rating. Braid is much easier to manage in diameters equivalent to the average 12 to 17 pound monos (at least 0.014" or so.) I don't measure with tiny calipers, I just take their word for it. Translated to braid, this may be 40 or 65 lb. test.

The same is true for spinning reels, it is just noticeable on casting reels because the test rating seems so high. Most use somewhere in the neighborhood or 20 lb. braid on their 2500 size spinning reels because it is about the same diameter as most 6 lb. monos.

Ah, thanks for clearing that up, that seems to make some sense.  I am almost afraid anymore not to run braided line, especially after how many times I've snapped my line without it.

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Re: braid diameters, the samuri in 55lb, is the same diameter as 12 lb mono.

BTW, the calcutta has been discontinued, they sold for about 229.00 A current Shimano in a crucial, should suffice.

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The other problem with small diameter braid (30lb or less) is it can have a tendancy to pull through the hook eyelet. This is especially a problem when flipping as the hook is often oriented back against the line when when the fish grabs it.

The first time I went flipping heavy mats I "broke" off two fish, before I realized the line wasn't broke...the knot was still intact. The 30lb braid I was using was so thin/strong it was cutting through the gap in the eyelet.

Most people use +50lb braid for flipping for this reason, because it's easier to manage (i.e. wind knots), and for added margin against abrasion (always a concern when flipping).

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The other problem with small diameter braid (30lb or less) is it can have a tendancy to pull through the hook eyelet. This is especially a problem when flipping as the hook is often oriented back against the line when when the fish grabs it.

The first time I went flipping heavy mats I "broke" off two fish, before I realized the line wasn't broke...the knot was still intact. The 30lb braid I was using was so thin/strong it was cutting through the gap in the eyelet.

Most people use +50lb braid for flipping for this reason, because it's easier to manage (i.e. wind knots), and for added margin against abrasion (always a concern when flipping).

That's pretty interesting.  Seems to make sense to use the heavier braid though.  I just wasn't sure that my reel could hold that thick of line, so I just went with 20lb braid.  Thanks for the useful information, I'll definitely keep that in mind next time I buy some more.

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just get yourself a 7'6" (or longer) heavy rod, and a high speed reel 6.3:1 or higher. some guys prefer the best quality for their flipping setups. i have a bps 7'6" telescopic med hvy rod and a quantum accurist with 6.3:1 gear ratio. it is probably my cheapest (least expensive) set up that i have. i flip, but not as much as most guys do. i also use 65# power pro. that stuff is like rope and i have never broke off on a flipping fish.

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