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Low_Budget_Hooker

The Dark Meat

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Does anyone know (for sure) what the dark meat is that is on certain filets like salmon, striper, etc  I always remove it, it is usually the culprit if something is "TOO" fishy.

I always assumed it was a fat layer seeing as how it is always between the skin and flesh.  Anyone know for sure?

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Russ,

The way I understand it is that meat is the muscle fibers of the fish. It generall breaks down and isn't as bad after cooking, but it contains the most colagen which is why it is the strongest area of odor and taste of the fish.

Here you go I got this off the web.

"Certain fish species, such as salmon, catfish and tilapia, have a pronounced dark muscle running down along the sides.

Due to lipid oxidation, the dark muscle in particular, is known to cause a rancid taste and smell in fish that has been stored fresh or frozen. "

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Thanks Jeremy.  As we both know, tuna store the fat in between the flesh layers but this stuff is different, all in one place, so I wasn't sure.  Odd, with stripers, it's red, but same area, same powerful taste.

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 Man, a small bite of dark meat in catfish can ruin a whole meal for me. NASTY!!! Supposedly farm raised has less than "free range" but every now and then...

                                                  As Ever,

                                                   skillet

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I never knew there was dark meat in fish, I always tossed them back.  I don't like seafood and fish to much.

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We always associated the blood stripe as to be bad fat and aids in the fishy taste.

   Striper guide told me it was bad fat.      I just know to cut it out.

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I never thought it tasted that bad.  

But then again I love a nice big bluefish filet too so i might be a bit out of the ordinary when it comes to this question.

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The dark meat or blood stripe as some call them serve two functions.

One is to circulate blood and its second function, it is home to sensors in the lateral line,

We all have general info on how fish use the lateral line.     Filleting the blood stripe out will give your fish a better smell and taste.

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Speaking of bluefish and fishy taste, a good way to get rid of most of the fishy taste, if you didn't already know, is to soak the fillets in milk for an hour before cooking them (I like it grilled).  Bluefish prepared in this manner is not fishy tasting at all, and quite delicious.

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The dark meat or blood stripe as some call them serve two functions.

One is to circulate blood and its second function, it is home to sensors in the lateral line,

We all have general info on how fish use the lateral line. Filleting the blood stripe out will give your fish a better smell and taste.

Matt nailed it.

Fish with a central strip of dark flesh are typically "migratory" fish.

The dark strip is actually bloodshot meat where the blood transports oxygen for long distance travel, thus the gamy flavor

For example, a dark strip is seen in bluefish, which are migratory fish, but tautog are residential bottom fish with white flaky flesh

The same is true of birds, where woodcock that migrate from Maine to Louisiana have dark reddish-brown flesh

but grouse and pheasants are stay-at-home birds with white flesh, like the flesh of a domestic chicken.

Roger

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Rolo, seriously, where do you store all of this information? WOW :)

I just make it up  ;D

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The dark meat or blood stripe as some call them serve two functions.

One is to circulate blood and its second function, it is home to sensors in the lateral line,

We all have general info on how fish use the lateral line.     Filleting the blood stripe out will give your fish a better smell and taste.

Matt nailed it.

Fish with a central strip of dark flesh are typically "migratory" fish.

The dark strip is actually bloodshot meat where the blood transports oxygen for long distance travel, thus the gamy flavor

For example, a dark strip is seen in bluefish, which are migratory fish, but tautog are residential bottom fish with white flaky flesh

The same is true of birds, where woodcock that migrate from Maine to Louisiana have dark reddish-brown flesh

but grouse and pheasants are stay-at-home birds with white flesh, like the flesh of a domestic chicken.

Roger

Cool info guys, thanks.

For all you Bluefish eaters,...you're nuts!! ;)  ;D Here in RI, the key is a mayonaisse bath before grilling, but still,.....NO THANKS!  I learned the hard way when I was younger that cooked "wrong", you spend hours sitting on the toilet.  Not a chance I'll ever take again, not with a bay full of Stripers to eat ;)

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Rolo, seriously, where do you store all of this information? WOW

I know he always amazes me.  

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