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airborne_angler

Found out a little about the RAGE

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Went out yesterday and threw some of the Rage Tail Baits I purchased recently. Got some good bites on the 7 inch Anaconda,but was only able to hook up with 1 fish.I was doing a slow YO-YO retrieve and on one of my pulls, I got into a tug of war match with the fish,I pulled gently on the retrieve,the fish pulled back,which caused an instant hookset reaction.

The hook I was using was a homemade Keel Weighted hook. I used a 4/0 EWG hook and crimped a rubber core sinker to the shank with the rubber core removed. I also tried a regular T-rigged method with a standard worm weight but it appears that was causing the bait to act like a regular old plastic worm. I feel better with a Keel weighted hook myself. Seems like it creates a different fall,which might be more enticing.

I think I was a little to quick on my other hooksets,either that or the bites came from smaller fish smacking the tail.

I really wasnt feeling the mood yesterday as the wind was gusting from all different directions and blew my 10 ft flat bottom all over the lake.Very Annoying. Spent more time trying to position the boat than I did fishing.Any little breeze and my boat was off the spot I was fishing. I had a drift sock deployed too.

I tried the Rage Toad but I think the position I was sitting in the boat(very close to the water) wasnt allowing me to get the bait up on plane very quickly,unless I held my rod tip high(12 oclock).

I tried the Rage Craw,but dont know I was working it right,or if I even had it rigged right. I was using it T-rigged on a 4/0 EWG hook. I was using a hopping retrieve,can anyone tell me if this is productive,or is a swimming retrieve better.Should I use a Kel weighted hook on the craw as well? Any tips on the craw would be appreciated

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Congrats on the fish an as well as the inovations for the homemade keel weighted hook. Going to have to try that one.

As far as the presentations they all work. The design of the baits make it seem as if the bait is comeing alive. I have had good luck useing both methods that you mentioned. Pretty much it all depends on what the fish want that day. Give them all a try.

memo

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You can use a keel weighted hook on any of them, craw, space monkey, lizard, toad, shad, lobster, or the anaconda.

I use a keel weight on the craw, lobster, monkey, lizard, and anaconda.  Toad and shad sometimes.

Think about a crawfish.  Where does it live?

I do run it very shallow, in shallow water.  I retrieve it fast enough so it leaves a wake on the surface, and change the speed so it breaks the surface, or leaves no visible wake.

But, in deeper water, more than two feet, I cast it, and let it drop to the bottom, leaving the bail open or the reel in free spool, depending on which type of reel I'm using.  

In five feet of water, I give it about ten seconds rigged on an owner 4/0 keel weighted hook.

Then I slowly take up the slack.  If I feel resistance, I slowly increase the pressure.  If I feel anything that indicates something alive has taken the bait, I set the hook.

If there is no resistance, I move the lure a foot or two and let it sit for a few seconds.  I do this two or three times.

If nothing has hit the lure, I retrieve it with occasional twitches and jerks, varying the speed.

If your experience is like mine, you'll find that most fish are caught on the drop, or the first two or three movements.  I'd say 3 of 4 fish are caught from splashdown to the time you use a "normal" retrieve.

If you're not catching them, change your presentation.  Do not get impatient, and do not stick with something that is not producing, be it technique or lure.

The most important thing you can do is to pay attention.

When you catch a fish or two, pay attention to depth, type of bottom, contours (structure) and vegetation, overhangs, fallen trees (cover).  Chances are, if you can find other areas of your pond with similar characteristics, you find they hold fish.

You may not find them there every day, in fact they may have abandoned those places an hour later.

But, if you pay attention, you will begin to decipher patterns to these movements.  When you learn these patterns or tendencies, you'll find you can make pretty good guesses at what to do, when they stop biting in one place.

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That's some great info Rhino....sounds like you've got a little experience with those baits  ;)  

I would also think about using a light weight 1/4 to 1/2 oz Carolina rig with any of those subsurface bait designs. The free movement provided is very enticing to the fish and this also allows the bait to move with a more fluid and gentle motion. This is a very important technique that is often overlooked by many in relatively shallow situations. Never under estimate a more subtle approach when things get slow.

Big O

www.ragetail.com

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That's some great info Rhino....sounds like you've got a little experience with those baits ;)

I would also think about using a light weight 1/4 to 1/2 oz Carolina rig with any of those subsurface bait designs. The free movement provided is very enticing to the fish and this also allows the bait to move with a more fluid and gentle motion. This is a very important technique that is often overlooked by many in relatively shallow situations. Never under estimate a more subtle approach when things get slow.

Big O

www.ragetail.com

Oh crap now I need another rod.

1)Flipping stick with a jig tied on, check!

2)Frog rod with Braid, check!

3)Crankbait/topwater rod, check!

4)Spinning set up with a drop shot or senko on, check!

5)Spinnerbait rod, check!

6)Carolina rig. Not yet!

I need a bigger boat!!!

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That's some great info Rhino....sounds like you've got a little experience with those baits ;)

I would also think about using a light weight 1/4 to 1/2 oz Carolina rig with any of those subsurface bait designs. The free movement provided is very enticing to the fish and this also allows the bait to move with a more fluid and gentle motion. This is a very important technique that is often overlooked by many in relatively shallow situations. Never under estimate a more subtle approach when things get slow.

Big O

www.ragetail.com

Each presents a different drop as well.

A weight at the nose will create a nearly vertical drop, while a keel weighted hook, with the weight below, and behind the nose of the bait will result in a drop like a plane gliding in for a landing.

It will be steeper than the glide path of a landing plane, but it gives the general idea.

When I was a commercial lobsterman, the "bugs" that were not "keepers" got tossed over the side.  Occasionally they would scoop with their tails to hasten their escape when they hit the water, but the vast majority would spread their claws, "freeze", and drop to the bottom with their body in a horizontal position, not unlike a sky diver.

Is the frozen body position a defense mechanism, to make the lobster appear as an inanimate object.  I don't know, but it is a plausible theory since lobsters are vulnerable to many species of fish, cod, stripers and tautog among them.

It's to their advantage not to attract attention visibly, or through motions detected in the lateral line of their predators.

What I do know is that I'm having a great time being able to fish in places I once considered unfishable.

I cover the emergent vegetation thoroughly.  

It appears that bass, unlike pickerel, don't usually charge the bait from great distances.  In the shallows, they prefer to ambush from close range.

I've often gotten strikes on a cast which follows a track only a foot away from the previous cast.  

Reaction, agitation, or simply presenting an easier meal?

I don't know, but it's obvious there are times the lure must land or pass in close proximity to the bass to generate a strike.

Fishing is a complicated, thought provoking, activity.  It's one of the reasons it appeals to me.  I enjoy solving puzzles.

Some are easy, some are challenging, some are frustrating.  The greatest satisfaction comes from finally solving the challenging and frustrating puzzles.

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Welcome to the RageTail Army!

Growing each day.

I started using a self made hook like you described and also tried wrapping different diameters of solder around the hook shank to achieve different weight. Now I just get the Gammy weighted hooks or Falcon.

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