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mistahubbs

Making a habitat

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I saw in an article that it is good in a pond fishing scheme to throw in some sort of object that the fish can make into a habitat.  

A. Does this work well?

B. How long before the fish actually begin to habitat there?

C. Will it work all year long?

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You can build habitat  several difference ways.  Old tires banded together or Stake beds work well.  The algie will start to grow on then with in a few days and the little fish will come to eat it and the bigger fish will eat the little one.  After the habitat  is place it will last till it rots out or is removeed.

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Don't use evergreen as they will catch a lot of dirt and fill up .  After that they are no good for the fish cannot hide inside of them.  The best is hardwood with all of the leaf off.  If they have leaves on them they will also clog up with dirt.  The very best is a steak bed.  Their are several way to make them

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Make a large square or rectangle wood platform that will stand about 12 inches or less. Fill it with rocks and drag it into the desired area. Come check on it the following season. Its the only thing ive seen done in person that worked as well as made myself this year but am waiting to see it in spring.

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If you look at all the land surrounding the lake, there are numerous types of woods that get left in the bottoms of the lake.

I use a mixture of woods to make brush piles.

First off, a cinder block from home depot cost about 2 bucks.      A sack of sacrete that is 80lbs cost less than 3.00 or close.

I use the 1 gallon plaster buckets, one bag makes 7-8 weights.    I buy the roll of wire, just like bailing wire for 2.98.    I cut coat hangers and make the eyelets to tie off to.     Turn them over and tap out, and re-use the bucket another time.

Xmas trees are a great start, they are dense and allow smaller bait fish places to hide easy.     The hardwoods such as oak don't deteriorate as fast as soft woods do.

I love to use cedars, just like Xmas trees, willows, and hardwoods all together.

Graphing out key features that fish normally transit is key in placing piles.  I also like to take the brush as it is cut, before the leaves dry out, in the summer, those leaves offer lots of shade, and the dried leaves will blow off enroute to the lake unless your already close.

If your in an area that has good populations of bass already there, it doesn't take long for them to start holding on the brush.

Older lakes that once had timber is now aging and rotting, adding new cover only improves habitats.     Giving the smaller fish places to hide only gives them better odds in surviving.

Hookem

matt.

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willow trees seem to make very attractive brushpiles, although i use a variety of wood to make em.

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