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Bass_Akwards

How big will a LMB get at my chain of ponds???

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I live in Colorado.  The state record LMB is 11.5 pounds.  What determines how big a bass will get in a particular lake or pond?   Is there a way to predict how big the largest bass will be in a chain of ponds?

I've been fishing at this chain of 20 ponds here in Boulder.  I've fished here 5 days a week for the last two months.  The biggest fish I've landed is about 4 pounds and I've landed three of them.  The environment is perfect for bass.  Plenty to eat.  Lots of cover and oxygen and the ponds are anything but over fished.  

How do you determine how long the bass in a particular environment will live, and how do you determine how big the bigger bass can get in a specific environment?  

I'm shocked every day that I dont catch more 5, 6,7 pounders out of these ponds, but after talking to different guys who have fished there for 10-25 years, they say 5 pounders are super rare.  

Can anyone tell me why the bass don't get HUGE here in Boulder?  Is it because the ponds are only  12-15 feet at the deepest and they freeze?  Is it because it gets cold here and their matabolism slows down and they're not eating that much 5 months a year?  I don't get it.  

What does a lake or pond need to grow huge bass?  Why can a guy 25 miles away, catch a state record at his lake, but a 5 pounder is RARE on my lake when they're so close in proximity?  

Where I fish theres tons of frogs, little bluegill, dragon flies, and insects and many other things for the bass to munch on and the LMG have no preditor fish to worry about.  Is it possible there's a state record in there and I just don't know it?

Todd

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Food availability and climate in relation to metabolism I think, are the 2 biggest factors.  

Bass metabolism goes much quicker in warmer water, allowing them to "process" more nutrients.  A Miami bass feeds more and for more months of the year than a Boulder bass.

I would say that for Colorado, 6,7's are one he!! of a catch, especially consistently!

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You mention a few factors that you've considered which could affect bass size.  Another factor is the possibility that a body of water contains too many bass, thus limiting their size.   If there is no selective harvest going on, and there are very few people who fish these ponds this could be a possibility.

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Type of bass, ie.....Florida's, Native LM, or Nothern bass.

Ideally, a body of water that doesn't get to hot or too cold, one that doesn't stress a bass at different times.   The key to growing big bass is longivety, how long is the life expectancy in your region.

That is also a good question for Mr Hannon.

Matt

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Guest Bountiful_Waters

Length of growing season is an issue in CO. Although the LM will eat year round, they won't eat as much when the ice is on for example. Those 4 lb bass you are catching may be much older and mature than you would think. What they are feeding on is another issue.

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How is the key to growing large bass longevity?  I read that huge bass that feed all year round, like in California, only live to be about 8 years tops.  Bass that DON'T feed and hunt all year live to be much older, like 12-14 years old.  Like in the Northern states.

God I can't freaking wait to fish a place where 5,6 pounders are a regular thing, and I could have a chance to catch a 10+  Anyone have any free tickets to lake El Salto?

Good info though guys, thanks.

todd

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California waters for example.     Most San Diego Resorvoirs are very deep.   Take into account that average summer temps and winter temps are mild compared to other regions in the US.

This allows a bass to grow 365 days a year no matter how long she lives.

What other areas of the US meet those conditions?    You don't see any lakes from the north, midwest,  challenging the WR.  Why?    Even if you had F1's stocked, you wouldn't have opmtimium conditions to grow them.

Matt

 

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What determines how big a bass will get in a particular lake or pond?

1.- Genetics: Florida or Northern strain

2.- Environment: fishing pressure, temperature of the water throughout the year, length of the growing season, etc, etc, etc.

3.- Food: supply and nutritional value

These three elements work in unison, the fish may have the best genetic make up ( potential to grow large ) and food but if the environment is not ( one or several elements ) then it won 't grow large.

For ex Cali fish, they have the genetics ( Florida strain ), they have an abundant food supply that 's also dense in energy, easy to digest and easy to catch  ( dumb hatchery raised trout ), also they have the environment ( not too warm, not too cold, deep clear reservoirs ), perfect place to grow a lunker, and they do grow big there.

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