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RobbyZ5001

Proper Fishing Form?

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What is the proper form for fighting fish? It all depends on what the fish is doing is the fish is staying down deep I have my tip high and am just doing what the fish lets me do drag wise. When the fish comes to the top to jump I usually drop my rod tip down sometimes i drop it below the surface I always keep tension on the fish though.  :-?

What is the proper hook set? With live bait and plastics I have been letting slack in my line and I usually wait for the line to go out or move and then set the hook. Jigging it's always tight. Cranking and topwater I move the rod toward the line and then bring it back to me and set the hook. Let me know what the "proper" form is. I would think there would be differnt opinions on the matter.  :-?

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For fighting fish I pretty much do the same thing. Only I don't drop the tip of my rod below the surface. I fish the fish according to what type of bait I'am throwing and what pound test. If I'm thorwing a jig and have the braid on. I know I can horse them. If I'm throwing a crankbait, rat-l-trap, or am finesse fishing. I take it real easy and let the fish do what he wants for the most part, because trebles can tare easily and finesse fishing= light line.

When it comes to hook sets. On texas rigs, jigs, or frogs I set it really good. For wacky rigs, and spinnerbaits, I just kinda give a little snap and start reeling. On baits with trebles, I found the fish usually sets the hook themself, and all I do is just real up on them and keep the pressure on. I used to try to set the hook with cranks and such, but I found I just ripped holes in the fishes mouth. I have been much more successful in keeping the fish hooked up with treble baits since learning the hard way.

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The main thing when fighting a fish is to keep pressure on him. If you loose pressure for one second he could possibly spit the hook. I've also learned that when fishing crankbaits, spinner-baits, jerk-baits, etc. ALWAYS prevent the fish from jumping; keep the rod tip low! When the fish jumps he creates slack in the line and allows him/her to spit the hook.

Another good idea would be to prevent the fish from darting under the boat. A fish that darts under the boat feels a leverage point at which he can spit the hook.

As far as landing the fish, if it is a big fish (4 pounds plus) I will generally let him fight himself into exhaustion, then lip him or use a net. If it is a smaller fish (less than 4) I usually pick up the rod tip and heave the fish aboard or if I feel a bad hookset I will net the fish.

So to summarize:

1.) When fishing crankbaits, jerkbaits, etc. keep the rod tip low!

2.) Never let the fish dart under the boat.

3.) Maintain constant pressure

4.) Don't let the fish jump unless you are 100% sure you have a perfect or great hook set and/or you keep pressure on them.

5.) If it is a big fish, let him fight himself into exhaustion.

Good luck!

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When fighting fish, I tend to let my rod do a lot of the work as far as keeping tension on the line.  I do this by keeping my rod high.  If the fish jumps, I let him jump.  I am really aggressive on fish and have only lost one jumper.  I never drop my rod tip.  If he jumps and you drop it, the motion itself can create slack.  When a fish jumps, I make him give up a lot of ground and really crank down on the reel.  I know it's boneheaded, but fighting redfish will give you some bad habits.  A lot of the fish I catch never jump though.

When I'm using light tackle and light lures...I do the same thing.  With crankbaits, I don't set the hook as hard, but I still keep my rod high.

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Pretty much what everyone has said...HARD hook-sets on single hooks, and just a tug on anything w/ trebles...ESPECIALLY top-water lures. I'll crank a couple of times, but wait until my rod bends before I tug gently to insure a solid hook-up. My hit-to-catch ratio has improved dramatically since I was able to avoid letting the excitement of a top-water hit get the best of me. I can't remember the last "spook-fed" bass that came off (knocking on wood)!

If I feel a keeper heading for a jump, I will send my rod tip into the water and crank down on him. More often than not, it will turn his head and help him decide to stay down...if not, at least you have a better angle (downward) to keep tension on him and keep him from spitting the lure.

I, too, will let a good fish (2# or better) play out...I enjoy it...but not to the point of exhaustion. Dinks will get a free ride across the top of the water!

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Guest muddy

The best thing I have found for me is to STAY IN THE BOAT, the alternative makes fighting a fish pretty hard!

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The best thing I have found for me is to STAY IN THE BOAT, the alternative makes fighting a fish pretty hard!

so true muddy, so true.  Add to that that no crankbait is worth getting into 40 degree water over....NONE :P

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I don't know why people get so stressed out about bass jumping. I WANT TO SEE THEM JUMP. Bring it on. So what if I loose one now and then. It's part of the fun.

Oh, and I let the rod and reel's drag do what they were designed for; fighting the fish. I maintain flex in the rod to protect the hookset and keep the drag set properly to protect the line.

Cheers,

GK

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I will add this. I am not sure what people mean by keeping the rod tip high because I can interpret that in two ways.  

High - As in the rod being 90 degrees relative to the water.  Going past 90 degrees no diminishes the rod's ability to pressure the fish.  So if it is meant high as up to 90degrees, that is alright. But if it is meant high as in past 90 deg. then I say that is not ideal.  Drawing a clock with 12 o'clock being directly above you, I would recommend not going past 90 degrees when fighting the big girls.  Maximizing the rod's power to wear down the fish ranges 30 - 90 degrees.  Keeping tension on the line within this range will aid you in applying good pressue to tire the fish with little chance of stressing the rod or line (At these angles, the rod is working within its traits. The line nor the rod should break here assuming no flaws in either).

High - As in well past 90 degrees. I am talking about during the fight, and not the hook set.  However, I rarely go past 90 deg. even on my hook set.  As stated, past 90 deg. gives the advantage to the fish.

There is an article about this that I will post when I get home this evening. I am an amatuer physicist (yeah, right). Okay, I am not, but I like to have every edge I can possibly have against our quarry, including ways to maximize the effectiveness of the rod.

At the wrong angles, any rod can break with as little as 2 lbs of force.  It means a rod can even be broken by a small fish.

When I fight a fish, maintaining constant pressure on them by keeping tension on the line and being mindful of the angle of my rod are the only things I key in on.  Once hooked, I rarely lose a bass. This ain't to brag.  Being skunked from the shore helps in that stat of rarely losing a hooked fish.  ;D

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My thoughts:

Single hook: Snap-set

Treble hooks: Mostly the fish sets the hook; otherwise, firm but not violent hook-set and constant pressure.

Jumping: Nothing. That's my favorite part of catching big fish, especially smallmouth.

Rod position: 10 o'clock to 12 o'clock. The rod fights the fish. When the fish runs against drag, I'm lovin' it; otherwise, she's coming my way.

Overview:

Use sharp hooks only, hook-sets are not an issue.  

Constant pressure is the key.

Let the fish run when it wants too, reel when you can.

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If you are going after trophy bass, by all means wear the proper attire.  No self-respecting Lunker would allow itself to be caught by some Yay-Hoo wearing a sleeveless undershirt and a John-Deere cap.  As much as possible, try to dress like Indiana Jones, and be sure to include the John Wane neck scarf.  Your Lunker catch ratio will go up exponentially.

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If you are going after trophy bass, by all means wear the proper attire. No self-respecting Lunker would allow itself to be caught by some Yay-Hoo wearing a sleeveless undershirt and a John-Deere cap. As much as possible, try to dress like Indiana Jones, and be sure to include the John Wane neck scarf. Your Lunker catch ratio will go up exponentially.

HEY, what's wrong with a sleeve-less tee shirt? Other than sunburns, skin cancer and crankbaits tangled up in your underarm hair.

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If you are going after trophy bass, by all means wear the proper attire.  No self-respecting Lunker would allow itself to be caught by some Yay-Hoo wearing a sleeveless undershirt and a John-Deere cap.  As much as possible, try to dress like Indiana Jones, and be sure to include the John Wane neck scarf.  Your Lunker catch ratio will go up exponentially.

LOLOL

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If you are going after trophy bass, by all means wear the proper attire. No self-respecting Lunker would allow itself to be caught by some Yay-Hoo wearing a sleeveless undershirt and a John-Deere cap. As much as possible, try to dress like Indiana Jones, and be sure to include the John Wane neck scarf. Your Lunker catch ratio will go up exponentially.

Seriously that is me lol. My lucky fishing hat is a john deere hat and I'm always wearing a cut off white fruit of a loom shirt when fishing on nice days. 8-)

That must be my problem!  ;D

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