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underwraps1

Little squid looking spinning things on top of the water?

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what color, type of water (salt or fresh)?

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i can't say that i've ever seen squid looking things in freshwater, but there is a pond in littleton, massachusetts that sports a very large population of some rare kind of freshwater jellyfish. they come out in the warmer months and are about 2 inches in diameter. its pretty cool.

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i can't say that i've ever seen squid looking things in freshwater, but there is a pond in littleton, massachusetts that sports a very large population of some rare kind of freshwater jellyfish. they come out in the warmer months and are about 2 inches in diameter. its pretty cool.

We have those at my local lake too. They tend to hang out in the deep water though. I see them all the time when I drop my Aqua View down there. Thousands of them in 50-65 feet during the summer. It almost looks like its snowing down there at times because there are so many of them.

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There is a small lake near me that has those fresh water jelly fish. They are only seen in the summer. All I have seen are about 1" in diameter.

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A lake i fish alot in the summer has freshwater jellyfish also, there always right on the surface of the water tho

I guess these are not as rare as I thought.  There is a lake in E. KY. that has small jellyfish also.

Kelley

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I'm in the area as well and have never seen anything as described.  Salt or fresh?  I'm in saltwater everymorning everyday without fail and I've seen nothing that resembles swirling squid.  Several weeks ago man o wars were beached all over the place, but they don't resemble squid at all.

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We have the same kind of jelly fish on March Chunk lake, when they swim it looks just like squid tentacles,

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A little off the subject, but how big can the biggest freshwater jelly fish get. I seen something one night on a lake and it freaked me out, lol no drugs or alcohol of any kind was taken. Just wondering if there is a 1 in a million chance that could be what i saw

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Alright somebody start linking some pics or something......because i dont think this guy is talking about fresh water jelly fish.

WE NEED SOME ANSWERS!!! ;)

What do you think they are? I guess ,since we need some answers, maybe you can enlighten us ;D

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I hate to cut and paste info , but this is fascinating, Bob

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

March 2008 - Jellyfish in the Huron River: Keep an eye out for freshwater jellyfish in the Huron River the next time you are in a backwater area where the current is not so strong. Scientifically speaking, freshwater jellyfish are not true jellyfish like their marine relatives (true marine jellyfish, hydra, coral, and sea anemones). They have some structural differences, but because they look like jellyfish, we call them jellyfish! Photo credit: Mike Dunn, NC Museum of Natural Sciences

The jellyfish are quite translucent, sometimes with a tinge of white or green. But keep a sharp eye out for them because freshwater jellyfish are much smaller, some can grow to about the size of a quarter. They have stinging cells for capturing prey, but because they are so small, they likely are unable to penetrate human skin. Some people report experiencing mild irritation after having come in to contact with the jellyfish, others are more sensitive to the toxin released by the stinging cells, just like some people are more or less sensitive to poison ivy.

The jellyfish are quite translucent, sometimes with a tinge of white or green. But keep a sharp eye out for them because freshwater jellyfish are much smaller, some can grow to about the size of a quarter. They have stinging cells for capturing prey, but because they are so small, they likely are unable to penetrate human skin. Some people report experiencing mild irritation after having come in to contact with the jellyfish, others are more sensitive to the toxin released by the stinging cells, just like some people are more or less sensitive to poison ivy.

Freshwater jellyfish prefer calm water to flowing water, and so are most often found in lakes and ponds. They are sometimes found in large rivers or backwater areas where the current is not strong. These freshwater jellyfish are actually quite common in our lakes just rarely seen. Freshwater jellyfish have been reported from over 150 lakes, ponds, and other waterbodies in Michigan, including several locations in the Huron River Watershed. Sunny days in late summer tend to be the best for spotting freshwater jellyfish, when the water is warm and food is abundant. However, jellyfish will not appear every year, even in a lake where they have been seen before. You can learn more about these cool aquatic creatures at www.jellyfish.iup.edu.

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Fresh or saltwater, makes a difference as to what they could be. Fresh water I would say mosquito larvae or some other insect, salt or brackish then I would say a shellfish or barnacle larva, shellfish larva will be able to swim not just move in circles.

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