Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Jigfishn10

Enjoy Your Memorial Day Weekend All

Recommended Posts

Thank you, and back at ya.

No fishing for me 'til Tuesday. Family cookout on Memorial Day, and we're getting everything shipshape for the holiday. But, I'll be outta here about 4:30 a.m. heading to a pond on the Cape. Be home early afternoon to play nine holes of golf with my wife.

Have a safe and enjoyable weekend to all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have a good one too!! Nothing exciting for me this weekend, helping my sister and brother in-law move in to their new house.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Same to you and all BR members. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i know they have their own different day as well. but remember those who laid down their lives so that we have this freedom.

one of many cemeteries which isn't here in america but is yet full of americans. the beaches of normandy D-day. have no idea how most of you view our military, but my family has served under arms since 1493 we have our family history traced back that far. you all have a great memorial day weekend, don't forget those who came before you.

normandy-american-cemetery.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You too! Hope everybody gets a chance to fish.

I'm gonna try and take my little guy with me Monday and catch some Bluegills.Should be fun,and I'm not forgetting the camera this time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Vance... I like to see folks remember why this weekend is being enjoyed... I won't be fishing until after Memorial Day... I have a lot of reflecting to do...

Top

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got you covered Vance, I'll be at the local American Legion hall bright and early on Monday for all of the various activities. Imagine if you will that an 18 year old that went ashore on D-Day will be turning 85 this year, while the men who stormed into Inchon will be 79 years old. An 18 year old veteran from when Saigon fell is one year younger than me!

While I always hoped that no one would ever qualify for membership in organizations like the Legion or VFW again (as in a severe outbreak of peace), I'm also very proud of the veterans who have served since my time.

Those who paid the ultimate price in our country's wars deserve all of our respect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just goes to prove today Soldiers are just as HOOAH as the Soldiers in the past.. this is in reference to PTSD but none the less put it out there that today Soldier should be given the same respect as any Soldier in any past conflict... war is war no matter how "digitized" a wound is still just that... so this is why we should thank all the Soldiers PAST and PRESENT that have given the ultimate sacrifice for their country..

in the past (Vietnam, World War II) casualties were several times higher, but combat was not as prolonged. Thus few troops lasted 200 or more days in combat. During World War II, it was found that 200 days was the average combat exposure a soldier suffered before starting to experience debilitating PTSD. But now the military, and the VA, are finding that some combat events can trigger more, or less, PTSD. Roadside bombs have, for example, caused soldiers problems because the blast can inflict mild concussion on troops who are not otherwise injured. Years later, those mini-concussions can cause mental problems.

Earlier patterns of combat were different. For example, during World War II, the bulk of the Allied troops in Europe went in after June 6, 1944. The fighting in Europe ended eleven months later. In the Pacific, the fighting tended to be episodic. A few months of combat, followed by many months of preparing for the next island invasion or battle. In Vietnam, not a lot of people went back for multiple tours, and those who did spend a year with a combat unit, spent less time in combat than they would in Iraq. Even during Vietnam, it was noted that many of those who were in combat for 200 or more days, did get a little punchy.

In Iraq and Afghanistan, army combat troops often get 200 days of combat in one 12 month tour, which is more than their grandfathers got during all of World War II. And some troops are returning for a third tour in Iraq or Afghanistan. The army has found ways to avoid the onset of PTSD (better accommodations, email contact with home, prompt treatment for PTSD), but many troops are headed for uncharted territory, and an unprecedented amount of time in combat. Thus the research, and new programs to spot PTSD as early as possible.

Things have calmed down since the peak year of combat, 2007, when 904 Americans died in Iraq (and 117 in Afghanistan). In that year, there were about 14,000 American PTSD casualties, while there were less than half as many troops who were physically wounded.

It's not the prospect of getting killed that causes the stress, but rather the constant state of alertness required to survive in combat. Death and injury is always a factor in military life. Over the last 25 years, the U.S. Army has always lost one or two thousand dead each year to accidents, disease and suicide (in that order). That meant about two troops per thousand died each year. In Iraq, the risk of getting killed or wounded in combat was 2-3 percent for a one year tour, in the worst years.

Since World War II, other factors for PTSD have been discovered. Israel noted, after the 1982 war in Lebanon, that reservists were more sensitive to the aftereffects of combat. The Lebanon conflict used a larger number (than previous wars) of older reserve troops, who tended to be more prone to coming down with stress disorders. This was probably due to the fact the full time soldiers are constantly conditioned to deal with stress. While this is often referred, often derisively, as "military discipline," it has been known for thousands of years that such practices reduce stress and panic during combat. Apparently it reduces the chances of coming down with stress problems as well. Thus the new programs to spot stress related problems, as early as possible, and also develop new treatments. The stress angle has been more intensively studied in Iraq than in any previous war. Naturally, the more you look, the more you find.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing poles

    fishing reels

    fishing reels

    fishing reels

    fishing

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×
×
  • Create New...