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I use Lews Tornament reals mostly. But I have two new flipping rods i need reels for and had a question. Do you need a high quality flipping reel? I turn the brakes way down to get longer flips so that isn't a big deal. The only issue is drag right? Give me your thoughts on flipping reels. Thanks.

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I think you're referring to a pitch, not a flip.  Flipping doesn't involve any of the reel until you hook a fish.  Then you reel it in.  No brakes required.  Pitching, on the other hand, is easier with a free spool.  Brakes rarely come into play since spool speeds are slow enough not to make a difference.  It's all in your thumb at that point.

 

In either case, you want a strong, aluminum framed reel, with a heavy, yet smooth drag.  Any other features are just preference.

 

http://www.bassresource.com/fish/flip-pitch.html

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Yes sorry I was so excited to write my post I said flipping. I met pitching.

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I pitch lews tourney pro and lews tournamet. Good reels. Advice, go out side and practice pitching into a coffee can or at target. I do this everytime i put a different reel on a rod i will be pitching or skipping with.

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A lot of people actually do get the two confused. My friend at work who's been fishing for over 30 years didn't know the difference until I showed him a video on youtube. 

 

Anyhow, since you're not pitching the bait too far, using a baitcaster that utilizes cent vs mag brakes doesn't matter so much. I would look however for a reel with a strong drag system since you're most likely fishing in areas with a lot of cover and will be setting the hook pretty hard.

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It comes down to personal preference. Any reel with a strong drag will work. I usually use a Revo S or SX, both of which have 20lb+ drag system if I remember correctly. 

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I hesitate to make this recommendation since these are long discontinued reels, but I use Daiwa TD-X HSDL reels for pitching.  They are left handed, which makes it easier for me to make the pitch, since I am a right hand caster, and having the spool release on the top of the reel, along with the ability to reengage the spool using that switch is a huge convenience.  Most reels from Daiwa allow you to flip the thumbar up to reengage the spool without touching the handle, BTW.  This reel just pits in a comfortable location. You can find them on the used market, and usually on the cheap.  I think I paid less than $50 for mine, which were lightly used.

 

IMG_3783-crop-L.jpg

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I use a lews tournament pro to flip and pitch and also frog with.  Having a high gear ratio is the most important thing, if you take away anything just make sure it is 7:1 and above.

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I know I want 7:1. I like the idea of using the thumb air to renegade the reel.

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You don't need a 7:1 reel.  You're using the rod to move the fish, not the reel anyway.  The difference between 6.3:1 and 7.1:1 is about two inches per turn.  In other words, the "7:1" thing is pure marketing.  Look at the IPT spec, not the ratio.  You probably save one crank per cast retrieving the bait.  That makes the faster reel, "nice to have," but not a necessity.

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I also use a LTP with ABE7 bearings. I'm not sure the bearings help a lot as far as the pitch goes but I also make a lot of sidearm casts and they free it up enough to be noticeable.

 

 

I'd like to upgrade to a Core with the Flipping "button"? but I'm looking for another used one. I got a Core50 used for $220 and I can't justify anything above that in price. There are just way too many great reels to be had at way cheeper...

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I think you're referring to a pitch, not a flip.  Flipping doesn't involve any of the reel until you hook a fish.  Then you reel it in.  No brakes required.  Pitching, on the other hand, is easier with a free spool.  Brakes rarely come into play since spool speeds are slow enough not to make a difference.  It's all in your thumb at that point.

 

In either case, you want a strong, aluminum framed reel, with a heavy, yet smooth drag.  Any other features are just preference.

 

http://www.bassresource.com/fish/flip-pitch.html

Theres the drags................X2

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You don't need a 7:1 reel.  You're using the rod to move the fish, not the reel anyway.  The difference between 6.3:1 and 7.1:1 is about two inches per turn.  In other words, the "7:1" thing is pure marketing.  Look at the IPT spec, not the ratio.  You probably save one crank per cast retrieving the bait.  That makes the faster reel, "nice to have," but not a necessity.

Don't think I have a reel thats setup for pitching that has a gr over 6.1:1.

Every one setup light on the drags and mod rod tip because of no stretch, and using the thumb for drag... :Victory:

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As has already been said, I to believe the drag to be the most important component in a good flipping reel. Not only its total number of pounds delivered at or near lockdown but also its smoothness. I pitch much more that I flip and I've found that I prefer a reel with centrifugal brakes over ones with any type of magnets or combination of the two. No matter how low you turn the brake setting on one there's still some force applied, not so with centrifugal brakes.

I do most of my flipping/pitching with a 6 ratio reel, I have used a 7 ratio before and while its nice to have I agree here with other members and feel its not a necessity. I've never used a reel with a flipping switch so I don't have an opinion there one way or the other.

These are a few of the reels I've used over the years on a flipping rod, and while I've settled into what I prefer most all these reels worked great. TDZ, Zillion HS, Fuego, Chronarch A & B series, Curado D, Citica E, and Curado E51.

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okuma cayenne and a quantum tour edition are the two i use when pictching.i want to get a new reel with a stouter drag for this next season

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Are you texting while driving ?

lol, that has to be the dreaded auto correct

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What fish are you guys fishing for that needs more than 10 pounds of drag. I live in Texas and have caught fish over 10lbs and never needed more drag pressure. I see Abu with the 20 pounds and I wonder why.  Its a sales gimmick if you ask me.

 

I routinely catch 8 and 9 pound bass and never worried about needing more than 10lbs of drag.

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I use a Chronarch200E7.

I'm calling BS. You know it's an STX ;) buhahahahah

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