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rippin-lips

Trolling Motor Questions. 12V Vs 24V

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I'm looking at buying a 19ft glass bass boat. It has a evinrude 150 on it. I'll need to purchase a TM and batteries for it. Optimally I'd love to do a 70-80# 24v system. My question is could I get by with a 12v and 2 batteries in parellel?

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You could get by with a push pole. You will NOT be happy with a 12v motor

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Yeah I didn't figure but since there's only a few months left to use it and I'll be about broke after the purchase I was just curious. It would at least get me around for now.

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Looking at the MK Edge TM at BassPro you're sitting at a $70 difference between a 55# 12v and a 70# 24v. Add in another hundred or so for an extra battery and that brings the total up to $170. Having used both a 55# and a 71# recently I can tell you it's most certainly worth the extra $170 spread out over however long you'll own the unit (plus the extra cost of an extra new battery every 2-3 years when you replace them). If you were in a 14-16ft aluminum boat you could "get by" with a 12v but in a 19'er I'm looking at a MINIMUM of 70# and likely getting a 100+# 36v at some point. I just got a 36v on my 21'er and...oh...it's NICE!

 

 

Bottom line - get the 55# and in a year (or less) you'll be looking back at that $170 you saved and WISH you could upgrade up to a 24v for only that amount.

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I will give you the facts and you decide,

Something in the line of the mid 50's is usually all you will find in a 12v motor, so you are limited on just how large you can go

Large 12v TMs can be harder to get rid of when you decide to trade up, most people want 24v when going with larger motors

A 24v system is about 25% more efficient than a 12 volt system, meaning you will get about 25% more run time when running on the lower settings where both motors would be developing the same torque.

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I found a good deal on a 24v #70 minnkota

Would a 60" shaft be too long?

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Depends on what you are putting it on.  On your average boat, it's going to be sticking up a couple of feet when you are in shallower water and tends to get in the way when casting.   You need to measure from the bow to the water on your boat and add a couple of feet to that.   Now, if you are fishing a lot of points etc where you are fighting heavy winds and boat wakes, being able to get that extra depth could come in handy, but I find what little I'm doing that, it's not worth the interference the rest of the time. 

 

I put a 60" on mine because I got it on sale, and finally took the head off a cut 10" off.  This is something the average boater should not consider because it will probably void the warrantee and it's not something that's easily done.

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Yeah that was an idea I had too. Cut a bit off the shaft.

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Like I said, that's something I would not recommend. There are a number of wires that go through the shaft and they all have to be shortened. The factories have access to special, heavy duty connectors that you don't have and they have a special process for installing them that you don't. If you get a bad connection, it WILL overheat and melt because of the current they carry.

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I can handle it. Just take my word for it.

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X2 to most everything said on here. Spend some extra $ and get a solid TM to begin with. You'll be looking back wishing you would have bitten the proverbial bullet.

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I know you are chomping at the bit to get on the water! The advice everyone is giving you is do it right the first time. Don't get a trolling motor to just get you by untill next year, the hassle of doing things twice will more than make up for getting the correct motor the first time!!

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Yeah I understand. It was just a question. Like I said optimally I want to do a 24v 70# system. Which is what I went with. Picked up a virtually new minnkota powerdrive v2 for $250 just had to take a road trip 3hrs away. It was used once.

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Rippin, is there a trolling motor repair shop in your area?

 

I had my 12-volt 48-poound thrust Motor Guide upgraded to a 24-volt 62-pound thrust and the difference is like night and day.

 

If there are no trolling motor repair shops in your area to upgrade and show you how to install and hook up the second battery may I suggest waiting until next year for the February sales to purchase the correct trolling motor for your boat? You will not be disappointed doing this and you will have time to study the trolling motors available and talk with others about thrust and batteries.

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Please see above post. I bought a 24v 70# minnkota powerdrive v2

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