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bigbill

Ipt And Reel Ratios

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I been thinking after I read a post about IPT and reel gear ratios. I'm starting to use broadcasters and I realize about some lures requiring a slower speed. I'm not sure what ratios everyone is using. I been buying the 6.3:1 and the 7.3:1 ratio baitcaster reels can these have too fast of a IPT for certain crankbait lures I plan on using? My point is do I need a 5.0:1 baitcaster reel for slower running lures?

Since I'm switching from the slower 5.3:1 spinning reels to the faster ratio broadcasters but I'm not sure of the IPT on the spinning reels. To me I need to readjust my lure speed when using the baitcasting reels.

With this said I hope I'm not over thinking this. But it sounds like it is a problem.

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A 26-28" ipt is fine for square bills which is typically around a 6:3:1 ratio. Deeper diving cranks create a lot of torque and you'll wear yourself out using a reel like above. That's where a designated cranking reel comes in hand. It's a lower ratio/ipt but you won't kill yourself reeling it all day.

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So a 5.0:1 bait caster is needed for deep diving larger billed cranks. Thanks I'm learning more and more about bait casting reels. Bigbill

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I wonder about being overly technical.  Do people not feel the lure working thru the water, then adjust their retrieval accordingly?  When I'm working a lure, especially too fast I can always feel it and I slow down.  Maybe I don't get it, but I fish combos light in weight to ones that are pretty heavy, don't really get worn out or tired.  My retrieval speed is always varied, often with in the same cast.  Being too mechanical and robotic just isn't for me, I am working my baits not just reeling them in, surprising how many strikes I get when my lure is at a total pause and not even moving.

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bigbill,

 

it's all personal preference and everyone is different but here are some thoughts for you:

 

1) spinning reel ratios cannot be compared to the ratios of baitcasting reels. the bigger arc of a spinning reel's rotor draws in significantly more line per turn than a baitcaster. take, for example the following comparable reels:

  • daiwa lexa 100 baitcasting reel, 6.3:1 gear ratio. line recovery in inches per turn (IPT): 25.7
  • daiwa lexa 2500 spinning reel, 6.0:1 gear ratio. IPT: 29.9

now, look at the bass pro shops pro qualifier spinning reel in size 20, it's gear ratio is 5.1:1 yet its IPT is a whopping 31!

 

by the way, basspro.com is an excellent source for finding out each reel's IPT.

 

2) some people don't have a problem speeding up or slowing down as the situation calls for...but some people do. in fact, that's me...i'm used to and like fishing fast. when i'm fishing a high-speed reel and the bait or situation calls for a slow presentation, i'm good at first but very quickly revert to my old habit of reeling fast...i can't seem to help myself and that is why i love low-speed reels for crankbaits, rattlebaits, spinnerbaits, a-rigs, swimbaits, and anything else that is constantly moving. a low speed reel allows me to fish at the pace that i like, but YMMV.

 

3) any bait that has a lot of water resistance will be easier to retrieve with a lower-geared reel. it's just like towing your boat up an incline...it'll be a lot easier on your engine if you use a low-gear than a high one. at the end of a long day chucking and winding big ol' crankbaits or spinnerbaits, my arms and shoulders feel a lot better when i used a low-gear ratio'd reel and a fast one.

 

so, bottom line: do you need a low-speed reel? absolutely not. but, there are times and situations where it is nice. my advice is this: if you only have one reel, get an all-purpose gear ratio like a 6:1. if you can have three or more reels, then start specializing and get the best tool for each particular job.

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I happen to be one of those folks who prefer the higher ratio reels. If I could score an 8.x:1 I would do so.

 

So my learned style is to adjust speed of retrieve. I can slow down my retrieve, but when I want to bring said lure in really fast to start over, say after a bad cast, I can only reel as fast as the reel will let me - or burn my arm out trying to get it in faster, LOL.

 

Thus I like my 7.1:1 Lexa retrieve more than my Chronarch 50e...

 

And my little Stradic 1000FI bring in line faster than my Lexa 2000.

 

I can totally understand, though, people who reel at a "consistent rate" for all types of presentations. They pick up a 4.9:1 for one thing, and a 7.1:1 for another thing.

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I use resistance to judge whether I'm running the right speed. 

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So far my success with spinnerbaits is to go slow. This is with a spinning reel. I do adjust my lure speed by sight. The second when I get no action above the sight line I slow it down so it's below the sight line where the fish are. I use and switch crankbaits to run at different depths too. But we can take a large Bill floating crank and run it at different depths by slowing it way down. I'm not sure how much of an adjustment I'll need to do since I'm switching to baitcasters more. I learned something new and very

important here. Thanks, bigbill

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21 farms pretty muched "nailed" the answer as far as I'm concerned. I've been experimenting--and changing my mind--about this issue for 20 years, so I have just a couple of additional comments. First, since I really started getting into square-bill fishing, I've read that a lot of guys feel the "need for speed" when deflecting these baits thru cover, so I've started experimenting with faster reels and found it's pretty hard to adequately "burn" a bait with only 20-22 IPT (like my 5.0 reels). I also like a faster retrieve when throwing lipless baits--especially in clear water--and since there's much less drag on the bait, it's a piece of cake.  Although I still like using the slower reels for all my baits in heavily-stained water (to help me slow down a bit), the final consideration I struggle with is adequately handling a big fish coming at straight at me without being able to take line up quickly. Once you lose a good fish that way, you start 2nd guessing your slow-reeling equipment. It's all compromise and trade-offs. So to better control a fish under these circumstances, I don't want a slow reel on a SHORT rod, so my 6-8 square-bill gets the "faster" reel. I actually use an old Curado 3.8 for my deepest divers. Matched with an 8 foot rood, I at least have a chance of managing any slack line when playing a fish.

 

What's the point in having a hobby if you can't enjoy "over-thinking" and "over-analyzing?"

 

:)

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