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How Much Does It Cost For Making Soft Plastics What Will I Need How Do I Scent And Color Them

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It can cost very little or it can cost a lot.

You need: a heat source (hot plate and pans or dedicated microwave and cups)

plastisol

colorant

some type of mold

maybe glitter

a ventilated place to work

Go to places like Jann's Netcraft, Lurecraft, Bear's, and Barlow's. Check out what they have to offer and see about starter kits.

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It will probably cost you more than you can buy them from in the store. Its more of a hobby than a money saver.

 

Not entirely. A gallon of plastisol may cost anywhere from 40-70$ depending on who you buy it from. Just as an example, people have mentioned being able to make 200 or more senko style baits from a gallon of plastisol. Buying all those senkos could cost you about $140.

 

$55 a gallon of plastisol.

$9 each per your favorite colors.

$4 each per your favorite flake.

$8 for a sinking additive or even less for salt.

 

Use a cheap microwave and a good Pyrex cup, you could easily still save around 40 or 50 bucks even buying multiple colorants and glitters.

 

The only thing that would put you over the edge is buying molds. If you take time to mess around with making your own from plaster, it can be very cheap to make your own baits.

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Not entirely. A gallon of plastisol may cost anywhere from 40-70$ depending on who you buy it from. Just as an example, people have mentioned being able to make 200 or more senko style baits from a gallon of plastisol. Buying all those senkos could cost you about $140.

 

$55 a gallon of plastisol.

$9 each per your favorite colors.

$4 each per your favorite flake.

$8 for a sinking additive or even less for salt.

 

Use a cheap microwave and a good Pyrex cup, you could easily still save around 40 or 50 bucks even buying multiple colorants and glitters.

 

The only thing that would put you over the edge is buying molds. If you take time to mess around with making your own from plaster, it can be very cheap to make your own baits.

 

That's the kind of logic that starts hobbies... I remember getting into it thinking I'd save money too. My wife believed it for a little bit, but caught on quick...  :grin:

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I tell everyone who wants to begin making lures that you will not save money, at least not for a few years. If you are disciplined enough to get just the amount of stuff you want just for you then maybe in 3 years or so you will benefit from cost saving but if you end up liking it then you'll end up with more molds and then more colors and before you know it you'll be an addict and saving money is no longer even thought about as you'll be constantly eyeing new molds or trying to come up with recipes for new colors. Trust me, you'll spend more than you would just buying baits.

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I have saved money. I knew what colors I wanted from the beginning and only bought a few select materials, as well as made almost all my own molds. The baits I've made are good producers and I haven't had to buy nearly as many craws, senkos, worms, or beavers since I started.

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I have saved money. I knew what colors I wanted from the beginning and only bought a few select materials, as well as made almost all my own molds. The baits I've made are good producers and I haven't had to buy nearly as many craws, senkos, worms, or beavers since I started.

 

Yes it is possible if you hand pour.

 

I got bored with that pretty quickly. It is addictive and I personally have no self control.

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I hand pour everything, and it with out a doubt saves me money. The thing I looked at when I started pouring was what baits are costing me the most? Swimbaits, craws, creatures, and senkos. I would have very little need to make my own tubes or finesse worms because I already buy them really cheap. I use lurecraft molds that run between 10 and 15 dollars. In all reality, you make your money back after pouring 5 packs including cost of plastic, colorant, and glitter.

 

As far as the plastic, colorant, and glitter, I kept it simple. I use chemionics plastic $35 for a gallon. Colors I have 4: black, watermelon, pumpkinseed, and white pearl powder. I can make plenty of greens between the watermelon, and pumpkinseed. Glitter I kept simple to blue, gold, and red. I use a microwave for free from a friend. In all, the investment for 3 molds and plenty of plastic, colors, and glitter will run you less than $100. Keeping in mind that I have yet to run out of glitter or colorant and I've poured well over a gallon of plastic.

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I understand the 1 color pours, buy the multicolors, I don't understand, different colors, top and bottom.

Kind Regards,

Charlie47

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I tried to make numerous POP molds and none give me the worm I am looking for.  So I decided to get some

aluminum molds and the product is great,  There is no way I will ever get back what I have put into the hobby,

but I will have all the rubber lures I want when i fish.  I plan on getting two more molds for injecting soon,

and that will cost me over 200 dollars.  That is a lot of lures and some of these discount stores.

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yeah and fly tying saves money too..... :)  I think it is more that it is an up front cost that doesn't feel as bad as it goes on.

 

I don't pour plastics but i do tie flies and if i followed the advice given here and stuck with what i like and only tied those types of flies i would be golden but that doesn't always work and you end up getting stuff here and there.  I imagine now after tying for over 10 years i can say that it is cheaper but with sites like sierra trading post having sales on flies that are ridiculously cheap i can't compete with that....it isn't as fun though to click add to cart :)

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I design my own baits with clay, and make my own plaster molds of my masters. I started with one mold of the original mater, and with the pours from that made a 5-cavity plaster mold, with another to come soon. Including shipping, my original order was $70 from Bear's Baits. ~$30 for plastisol, $3.50 ea. for colorants, $3.50 for scent, $3.50 ea. for flake. I got four colors to begin with: brown, chartreuse, green pumpkin, and junebug (indigo). Two colors of flake: red and black, and one bottle of scent. I am very pleased with the quality of everything, especially the plastic. I have made some very nice pours.

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Face it both hard and soft lure making is a great winter time hobby; it's not about the money, it's about the enjoyment, relaxation, and the fun of giving them away to friends and co-anglers. I say jump in the hobby is great.

BTW, the components make a good cheep birthday or Xmas list for friends and family.

 

 

At one point I made worms out of candle wax and then made a two part plaster mold around the model. I then heated the mold to the point where the wax ran out, the process is called "Lost Wax Molding". Some wax soaked into the plaster which helped bait removal later on.  It was a fun project at the time, but the molds didn't last for long.

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Face it both hard and soft lure making is a great winter time hobby; it's not about the money, it's about the enjoyment, relaxation, and the fun of giving them away to friends and co-anglers. I say jump in the hobby is great.

BTW, the components make a good cheep birthday or Xmas list for friends and family.

 

 

At one point I made worms out of candle wax and then made a two part plaster mold around the model. I then heated the mold to the point where the wax ran out, the process is called "Lost Wax Molding". Some wax soaked into the plaster which helped bait removal later on.  It was a fun project at the time, but the molds didn't last for long.

Its probably a great feeling to catch a fish on a lure you made yourself

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Its probably a great feeling to catch a fish on a lure you made yourself

 

Yes, it is.....  It's also fun to see the look on someone's face when you give them a bait.

 

I've made all forms of baits and always end up with more than I could possibly use.  So I pass them around and only ask for honest feedback on how they worked for the user.

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