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Dropshot Weight Question

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So I've been shopping around for drop shot equipment and I saw these weights. I guess that the line just clips in and stays? My questions are, has anyone used these weights and do they actually stay on?

vmc-dropshot-weight.jpg

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You just clip them on like you thought the stay on very well it's so you don't have to tie them on I like the pencil shaped ones personally

Tight lines

Andrew

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Yes - but you can improve your retention percentages by tying a small over hand or figure 8 knot at the end of the tag line.  Simply slip the weight's clip right above the knot.  This will help hold it a bit better.

 

A-Jay

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Yes - but you can improve your retention percentages by tying a small over hand or figure 8 knot at the end of the tag line.  Simply slip the weight's clip right above the knot.  This will help hold it a bit better.

 

A-Jay

 

That too 

  tight lines 

    Andrew

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I have the tendency to break the line when I clip them on… I want to cinch them up nice and tight!  Gotta be gentle. :)

 

I like the pencil type the best.  I rarely fish for suspended fish with a drop shot, and am usually dragging bottom.  Pencil weights get hung-up much less.  I suspect round would be better if fishing in open water as you wouldn't have to worry about any "flutter" during a decent. 

 

I've also had ok luck with a bullet sinker slipped on backwards.  You can cap off the end of your line with a split-shot, or tie on something like a split-ring.  Works in a pinch.

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I pretty much only use the pencil style, and recently I have converted over to tungsten weights, not because of the added feel, but for the reduced size. It is a huge advantage when fishing in rock/wood/weeds to have the smallest profile weight that you can, but still have enough weight to keep good contact and feel. 

 

Mitch

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A new trick I started employing last season with drop shot weights was buying 1/2 oz and 1oz weights and throwing a drop shot rig on my bait cast setup with 12lb fluorocarbon and a 2ft leader from bait to weight. I would find grass in minimally 15ft of water all the way to 30ft and drop the heavy weight into heavy grass. The weight gets caught up reel good in the grass and this allows me to work a zoom fluke like you wouldnt believe. You can input infinite amount of action on your ds bait because the weight is essentially stuck on the bottom. With a standard drop shot setup too much movement with your rod lifts the bait and the weight off the bottom, not with this technique however. If you were to watch me fish this setup, it looks like im stuck on bottom. Violent rips and snapping of the rod on slack line makes the bait dance so much more erratically. It obviously defeats the original purpose of drop shotting as a finesse technique with 12 lb line, but its a presentation I have a feeling not many people are using.

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 It obviously defeats the original purpose of drop shotting as a finesse technique with 12 lb line, but its a presentation I have a feeling not many people are using.

 

there is a common misconception that a drop shot has to be a finesse technique, but in reality it doesnt. you can go as big or small as you want to as far as line, weights, hooks, lures, etc...

 

 

as for weights, i dont use those hook on drop shot weights. i use bass casting sinkers. put a split ring on the sinker eye, and a swivel on the split ring and tie to the swivel. since the sinker swivels and the swivel swivels(i know, i know) it helps eliminate line twist. plus i use the bass casting sinkers for other types of fishing so i always have them, eliminates the need to buy special sinkers. and i dont really get hung up a bunch to worry about it, i just break the line if i do...

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A new trick I started employing last season with drop shot weights was buying 1/2 oz and 1oz weights and throwing a drop shot rig on my bait cast setup with 12lb fluorocarbon and a 2ft leader from bait to weight. I would find grass in minimally 15ft of water all the way to 30ft and drop the heavy weight into heavy grass. The weight gets caught up reel good in the grass and this allows me to work a zoom fluke like you wouldnt believe. You can input infinite amount of action on your ds bait because the weight is essentially stuck on the bottom. With a standard drop shot setup too much movement with your rod lifts the bait and the weight off the bottom, not with this technique however. If you were to watch me fish this setup, it looks like im stuck on bottom. Violent rips and snapping of the rod on slack line makes the bait dance so much more erratically. It obviously defeats the original purpose of drop shotting as a finesse technique with 12 lb line, but its a presentation I have a feeling not many people are using.

BUBBA SHOTTING- is what this up sized version is called. Im guilty of not doing this enough. A lot of locals here employ this method in our hydrilla filled flats and have good production.

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I've got a redneck drop shot rigged up to flip and pitch with. 1/2 ounce tungsten weight 6 inches below a flipping hook with a Smallie beaver on it.

Seems like I would get a lot more action flipping it

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I bubba shot more than finesse drop shot.  I think that the clip on weights are a handy option.  Tying on overhand knot in the tail end of line is a good idea.  Currently I'm using 20 lb Abrazx

 

Now, to answer the question, occasionally,  I've had the line break when I tried to slip it into the sinker.    Every time, this was a result of me hurrying and not carefully inserting the line and then snugging it up.  If you get in a hurry or get clumsy, you will often break the line using this style of drop shot weight.

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If you are just going to buy one style I'd go with the cylindrical ones. They don't get hung up nearly as much in rock/gravel and don't grab as much in grass.

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I have seen someone using these Tungsten Drop Shot Cylinder Weights.  I guess the big benefit is if it gets snagged at the bottom, you don't use your hook.  And it is really to put on.

Anybody has recommendation where to find these cheap?

 

thanks

 

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My favorite are the teardrop style dropshot weights. I use West Coast Tackle Quickdrops in 3/16 oz. 

http://img.tacklewarehouse.com/watermark/rs.php?path=WCQD-1.jpg&nw=302

 

And just recently started using the Tungsten Teardrop weights from omfishingsinkers. 

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12 hours ago, ib_of_the_damned said:

My favorite are the teardrop style dropshot weights. I use West Coast Tackle Quickdrops in 3/16 oz. 

http://img.tacklewarehouse.com/watermark/rs.php?path=WCQD-1.jpg&nw=302

 

And just recently started using the Tungsten Teardrop weights from omfishingsinkers. 

I also really like the teardrops from WCT in 3/16 or 1/4.  Quick off and on and I've never lost one on a fish or bottom.  Might not have quite as much luck if the bottom was full of vegetation, but our lakes are mostly rocky bottoms.

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I have used them and yes they stay on, unless you snag something dragging them on the bottom. They are designed to come off with a few tugs when stuck so you don't lose your whole rig.

 

I have improvised a lot of different sinkers as dropshot weights when low on resources. Split shot, Dipsey sinkers and even egg sinkers with a bobber stop to hold them on at times.

 

 

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I was skeptical at first if the clip would hold a weight but I've gone up to 1/2 oz sinkers and chucked the living ***** out of my rig to cast across small coves and the weight stays put.  Benefit is if you snag on the bottom, instead of possibly losing your entire rig and having to re-tie you'll just lose the weight and just need to clip on another weight.  If you dropshot a lot it's a lot more efficient and quick to re-tie.

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Good topic.. No wonder the line keeps breaking when I tried cinching the knot

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