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noobpro

Baitcasting Question

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I am new to the forum and before anyone starts bashing on the topic and my question I have already tried searching but have not come to a conclusive answer to what I really want answered.

 

I am fairly new to baitcasting, got myself a few chronarch ci4s and a couple of dobyns champion/extremes and so far so great, i love the setups.  I've looked at Gene's videos on how to setup baitcasters and have become "ok" at baitcasting but no where near as good as I want to be.  I guess I'm just a bit fixated on "distance" and I know everyone says distance comes with time but I am curious as to how far people are throwing, with what lure, and how they setup their baitcasters.  

 

ci4/dobyns 705cb

ci4/dx703c

ci4/dx765

ci4/kvd tour 6'6" 

 

For example, I've been practicing and it seems I can throw a cotton cordell (1/2oz I assume)  about 37/38 yards (yes this was measured!) on 12lb seagur invizx.  i set my baitcaster with 2 breaks on/2 off, and fine tuned the dial to around a 2.  I'm still not sure what people say when they say they set their spool loosely to the point of where it barely just doesnt move side to side, but if I did that I would birdsnest all the time.  I would say I set my spool tension to the point where if I let it hit the ground it would cause a few overruns.  

 

My question is, are people really getting 50+ yards with their baitcasters throwing cranks/spinnerbaits/jigs consistently?  How exactly are people dialing their baitcasters to the point where people are "casting a mile" (which I assume is just relative and everyone has their own different definition).  Any help would be truly appreciated.  I don't really feather the reel either until its about to drop in the water but occasionally I may slightly just put a little thumb pressure over my spool.  

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My opinion is that people greatly over-estimate how far they're casting.  35-40 yds is a long cast and hook sets become iffy at those distances.  It sounds like you're doing fine.  As you get more experience, your thumb will get better at stopping the spool and keeping it from backlashing.  There aren't any magical brake settings, just experience and practice.  I wouldn't expect your casts to get much longer than they already are though.

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thanks for your honest feedback jrob78, I do assume that some people may really just be overestimating how far they can really throw and I guess that's what peaked my interest and frustration of not being able to cast "50 yards" like some of these other guys....

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IMO, casting distance should be least of anyone's concerns.  Unless you are bombarding a huge flat in ultra-clear water, accuracy is far more important than distance.

 

However, if you really want to cast beyond everybody, get yourself a 7'6" medium action rod with a lot of flex, load up with the heaviest version of the lure your want to throw, and learn a good two handed overhead cast.  You could even add a 2oz inline weight like we use for trolling which will get you even more distance.

 

Then all you have to worry about is trying to set the hook that far away!

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Twenty five yards is a good cast, if you are trying to catch fish.  If you are going for world record casts, "Lund Explorer," has the right approach.  I would stick to catching fish, lots more fun.

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Less brake and more thumb. Long casts generally aren't important, but it sure us fun till the birdy shows up

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Don't worry about distance. That equals lost lures and back lash .turn your dial to about 4 and cast away. Youll get that point of less brakes and dials soon

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I would guess that with most cranks between 1/4 and 1/2, no one is casting 50 yards. The cotton cordell lipless is not the most arrow-dynamic lure, so just less than 40 yds is pretty good. I would set only one brake shoe on, and then set the fine tuner at max. Keep lowering it every cast until you backlash then just turn it up slightly so you don't.

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Your casting distance is fine, I learned on Abu Garcia round reels back in the 80s with no brakes, you had to use your thumb and spool tension knob. That said, I took some rods and reel to the local high school football field, I know the guys that take care of it and I live right next to it and when I asked to make some practice casts for about an hour as they were working, I was told to go ahead. What I did was use a few different lures and reels to see what I was getting in a cast and here are the results. With a spinnerbait and a good roll cast I was hitting 26 yards on average with a long of 34 and a short of 19. With a 3/4oz one knocker lipless crank I had an average of 53 yards wit a long of 62 and a short of 44, the same lure in 5/8oz I had an average of 49 with a long of 58 and a short of 41. When I got into the 1/2oz and 3/8oz it was a different game, I was able to barely hit 50 1 time out of 20 cast or so with a 1/2oz jerkbait with a weight system in it, but on average I was hitting 37 to 42 most of the time, when I tried to heave it is when I would get a backlash, and when I say heave it I mean trying to get that little bit extra. Here is something else that will blow your mind, most of us will tighten the spool tension knob a little extra and maybe another brake turned on to really give it a whip and you get to do that without backlashing but it only ends up as far as a nice easy cast with normal settings, believe me I tried a bunch of stuff and my conclusion is that yes, 60 yards can be made but much more than that on a consistent basis means that the caster is extremely talented or the estimation of distance is exaggerated and in reality 38 to 45 yards is the normal range of casting distance.

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I guess i am one of the few people who believes the ability to cast a long way is a good thing. this doesn't mean i make long casts all that often, but tuning a reel to be able to make long casts without backlashing allows me to cast shorter distance with less effort and more accurately... so for the OP i would suggest these few things to maximize distance out of your current setups... 

1) remove spool bearings flush and lube properly...(or replace with bocas or hawgtech ceramic bearings)

2) continue to train your thumb ( this will probabily make the area of most improvement)...

3) use a smaller diameter line like 10 lb instead of 12, and use a line conditioner like kvd to reduce friction between the line and guides...

 

Mitch

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I've lost most of the biggest fish I've hooked due to casts out in the 50 yard range. Including several 8-10's that easily would be my biggest. It's a long way to fight a big fish. However in super clear water or if you see them blowing up bait fish it may be your only choice so being able to make the long cast is a good thing you just don't need to do it all the time

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I am new to the forum and before anyone starts bashing on the topic and my question I have already tried searching but have not come to a conclusive answer to what I really want answered.

 

I am fairly new to baitcasting, got myself a few chronarch ci4s and a couple of dobyns champion/extremes and so far so great, i love the setups.  I've looked at Gene's videos on how to setup baitcasters and have become "ok" at baitcasting but no where near as good as I want to be.  I guess I'm just a bit fixated on "distance" and I know everyone says distance comes with time but I am curious as to how far people are throwing, with what lure, and how they setup their baitcasters.  

 

ci4/dobyns 705cb

ci4/dx703c

ci4/dx765

ci4/kvd tour 6'6" 

 

For example, I've been practicing and it seems I can throw a cotton cordell (1/2oz I assume)  about 37/38 yards (yes this was measured!) on 12lb seagur invizx.  i set my baitcaster with 2 breaks on/2 off, and fine tuned the dial to around a 2.  I'm still not sure what people say when they say they set their spool loosely to the point of where it barely just doesnt move side to side, but if I did that I would birdsnest all the time.  I would say I set my spool tension to the point where if I let it hit the ground it would cause a few overruns.  

 

My question is, are people really getting 50+ yards with their baitcasters throwing cranks/spinnerbaits/jigs consistently?  How exactly are people dialing their baitcasters to the point where people are "casting a mile" (which I assume is just relative and everyone has their own different definition).  Any help would be truly appreciated.  I don't really feather the reel either until its about to drop in the water but occasionally I may slightly just put a little thumb pressure over my spool.  

here is a bit of advice, or just my opinion.  do not worry quite so much about distance.  worry more about learning to fish as close as you can.  fishing closer will add up to better hook sets, and more fish landed.  learn to be accurate when the need arises, learn to flip and pitch, and practicing out in the back yard will help you get better too.

 

bo

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I agree with what everyone else has been saying. Don't worry yourself with distance. Just focus on accuracy of your casts and not backlashing. But if you want numbers I usually throw a 3/8 ounce jig about 40 yards and I can throw big cranks 50+ yards. That being said you won't get a very good hook up ratio at these distances so don't stress about it.

Good luck and happy fishing!

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thanks for everyone's input but I am not looking for generic answers nor "don't worry about distance"...it's something that I want to achieve so it's something I do want to worry about, and for accuracy and such I don't think i'm the best but I think i do a fairly good job at it...I am looking for answers that smalljaw67 gave, specific to what he did and what he actually tested...I think people who are new to baitcasting and trying to get more proficient already understand the basic setup "set the spool tension so it slowly drops and set the brakes at about half," but there is no clear specific advice on how to advance further, i think by actually sharing how we set our reels and how much distance we are REALLY getting would help those who are trying to progress...

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Every person I've seen trying to become successful in using a bait casting outfit has learned by the following steps.

 

1. Backlash Control

             A. Spool Tension

             B. Internal Brakes

             C. Thumbing

             D. Wind!

 

2. Accuracy

            A. Roll Cast

            B. Side Arm Cast

            C. Overhead Cast

 

Repeat Steps 1 & 2 for every possible lure thrown.

 

Long after you've mastered all of the above?

 

3. Distance

 

However, if you still want to put the cart before the horse, follow the instructions I gave you the first time.  Get yourself a 7'6" medium action rod with a lot of flex, load up with the heaviest version of the lure your want to throw, and learn a good two handed overhead cast.

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noobpro, you sound as though you cast the same way that I do. I personally don't like setting up my reels to the point that I need a lot of thumb to have a successful cast. For some rod/reel/lure combos, it may be 2 brakes on and 4 off or 3 on and 3 off. The cast control knobs on my reels are set with less tension than Mr. Glenn recommends but that works for me. I feel that I get great distance the way that my reels are set up. The last thing I want to worry about when I fish is backlashing. I have played around with my reels with no brakes on and a lot of thumb and end the end, the distance was no better that normal settings because I had to use so much thumb pressure that it negated the no brake settings. I would rather cast  with just a little thumb pressure and know that I am good to go than cast for the moon and hope that I don't get a backlash.

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FRY

            When I first started baitcasting I would pratice in my yard.I would throw diffrent weigh lures with out hooks.

            Line weigh made a diffence as well.it takes time .Are you fishing mostly crankbaits?I use 14-17 test on

            Norman DD22,POES,3/4 rattle traps.I like fishing gravel pits with deep divers.I would say my casts in the

            gravel pits range around 40-50 yds.it I put on a 1 OUNCE TRAP.I am guessing 50+

            pratice.

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The distance at which you can land your lure in an area the size of a coffee can is a good distance. Practice practice

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Every reel and braking system is unique...Practice, Practice and exerimenting with different lines is often the best way to achieve desired distance and accuraccy. In order to learn, professional overruns will happen, as wind, line twist etc...are all parts of the equation, as well as working the thumb....Some guys go light on breaks and tight on spool knob, some just put mags halfway, and set spool loose, it all depends on what you find works best for you....

 

only way to achieve your desired goal is to spend time on the water with your reels and try various types of line and diameters until you figure out what works best for you...Not sure there is a magic setting but I sure wish there was....I will say that if I want to obtain maximum distance with mimimum over runs....I find 10-12lb Mono to cast the easiest for me.

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