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Soft Plastic Lure Scent

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I love to throw soft plastic lures on a texas rig but I'm always worried about their scent. Should I be afraid of getting "human scent" on my lures while rigging them? Also is it ok to pre-rig a lure and let it sit on the deck of my boat, or will the sun dry it out and reduce the effectiveness of any fish attracting scent on the bait?

Thanks guys.

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Get JJ's magic and dip any soft plastic in it before you throw it. You'll never worry about 'human scent' again. As for leaving a pre-rigged lure set on the deck, it all depends on how long you're letting it sit, the sun, how hot it is, ect. If it's a hot, dog days of summer type day I will keep my plastics in the shade and won't rig one until I'm ready for it. If it's a cloudy, cooler day I don't have a problem letting it sit on the deck for a little while.

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I don't think bass know what humans smell like.  The only things I try to avoid is getting chemicals like gasoline or oil scents.  I pre-rig a lot of the rods in the morning and fish them all day with no issues. 

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Thanks for the advice guys! I really appreciate it!

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It's a biological fact, bass are sight feeders with a very poor sense of smell.
Fish species with barbels such as bullheads, catfish and carp have a good sense of smell,

but I've never heard of an instance where a catfish or carp was repelled by human scent.

In fact, the cornmeal doughballs I use for carp bait are thoroughly kneaded by human hands.

Moreover, carp are deemed the craftiest and wariest of all fish.

 

For animals with a keen sense of smell such as deer, dogs and bear, masking human odor is a myth.

Adding odor to another odor doesn't eradicate anything (else bloodhounds would be out of job)

When deer hunting, I've tried every cover scent imaginable, but all to no avail,

Whenever I place myself upwind of a buck, it's a pretty safe bet I'm going to hear a farewell nasal snort  :sad10:

 

Roger

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I don't know what to think......the most effective baits for me are Rage Tails, which have coffee scent. Nothing like a natural prey! 

I guess it hides my scent more than anything else. 

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Thanks guys!

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It's a biological fact, bass are sight feeders with a very poor sense of smell.

Fish species with barbells such as bullheads, catfish and carp have a good sense of smell,

but I've never heard of an instance where a catfish or carp was repelled by human scent.

In fact, the cornmeal doughballs used for carp bait are thoroughly kneaded by human hands.

Moreover, carp are deemed the craftiest and wariest of all fish.

For animals with a keen sense of smell such as deer, dogs and bear, masking human odor is a myth.

Adding odor to another odor doesn't eradicate anything (else bloodhounds would be out of job)

When deer hunting, I've tried every cover scent imaginable, but all to no avail,

Whenever I place myself upwind of a buck, it's a pretty safe bet I'm going to hear a farewell nasal snort :sad10:

Roger

http://www.fieldandstream.com/articles/hunting/deer-hunting/finding-deer-hunt/2012/06/cover-scents-work-better-odor-reducing-produ

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A K-9 test was performed using a group of people and a handkerchief.

While the dog was out of the room, someone in the group would pick-up the hanky then drop it to the floor.

The dog was brought into the room and allowed to sniff the hanky. The dog not only picked up

human scent every time, but went unerringly to the person in the group who touched the hanky.

This test was repeated for everyone in the group, and the dog had a near-perfect score.

Interestingly enough, the only time the dog showed any indecision was between twin sisters.

Apparently confused by nearly identical DNA, the dog paced back-and-forth between the twins.

 

Roger

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I love to throw soft plastic lures on a texas rig but I'm always worried about their scent. Should I be afraid of getting "human scent" on my lures while rigging them? Also is it ok to pre-rig a lure and let it sit on the deck of my boat, or will the sun dry it out and reduce the effectiveness of any fish attracting scent on the bait?

Thanks guys.

I use garlic or crawfish scent on any lure that I fish slow or deadstick even if the lure is already impregnated with scent. I don't know if it matters but I always catch more bass when I use them and my friends don't. i think it is even more important to use it during the summer months because of sun screen and bug sprays. the only lures i won't leave in the sun are pork trailers and Berkley gulp lures.

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It's a biological fact, bass are sight feeders with a very poor sense of smell.

Fish species with barbels such as bullheads, catfish and carp have a good sense of smell,

but I've never heard of an instance where a catfish or carp was repelled by human scent.

In fact, the cornmeal doughballs used for carp bait are thoroughly kneaded by human hands.

Moreover, carp are deemed the craftiest and wariest of all fish.

 

For animals with a keen sense of smell such as deer, dogs and bear, masking human odor is a myth.

Adding odor to another odor doesn't eradicate anything (else bloodhounds would be out of job)

When deer hunting, I've tried every cover scent imaginable, but all to no avail,

Whenever I place myself upwind of a buck, it's a pretty safe bet I'm going to hear a farewell nasal snort  :sad10:

 

Roger

i believe bass are sight feeders as well but once the bass has the lure in their mouth do you think they keep it in their mouths longer when scent is used. i fish clear lakes and have watched bass strike a lure and spit it out before i could set the hook. i have also seen many videos were a bass would totally engulf a lure and spit it out. i fished with a guy that used wd-40 on his soft baits and he caught the most bass that day. i don't know if scents work or not but i have success when i use them.

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i believe bass are sight feeders as well but once the bass has the lure in their mouth do you think they keep it in their mouths longer when scent is used. i fish clear lakes and have watched bass strike a lure and spit it out before i could set the hook. i have also seen many videos were a bass would totally engulf a lure and spit it out. i fished with a guy that used wd-40 on his soft baits and he caught the most bass that day. i don't know if scents work or not but i have success when i use them.

 

I believe that once something enters the mouth, the sense of taste outweighs the sense of smell.

In that regard, it's tough to best sodium chloride (NaCl)   :smiley:

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Everyone has a difference opinion and favorite attractant for soft plastics. Bass will eat soft plastics that you discard with or without attractants added! Salt impregnated soft plastics is a very common scent/taste attractant that isn't messy. Some attractants are very oily or greasy, smell bad, taste worse and stain boat carpets or your clothing if you let them come in contact with your hands, carpet or clothing.

If you need attractants to give you confidence to fish your soft plastics longer, go for it.

I wouldn't let JJ's in my boat.

Tom

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Not even going to answer this one

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Sometimes I'll take a bait that's been on the rod a while and put it in a bag of new baits to get that anise scent back on it. Zoom Trick worms don't have an oil on them, but they taste like salt. I know this because once the first half inch of the worm gets damaged, I'll bite it off (and spit out) and re-thread what's left of the worm back on the hook. I think that salt impregnation is more effective at getting the fish to hold it. They sure don't seem to ever spit it out.

 

BTW, I think the worm actually has a better action after you bite that little bit off.

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I use to use a lot of Pro Cure but the smell of that garlic just started giving me major headaches and I would get very nauseous. I stopped using scents and I haven't noticed a decrease in the amount of bites I get. 

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I agree wholeheartedly with Tom and Rolo on this one. 

Only adding, that scent is completely overrated in fishing for bass.

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I've been trying Spike-It lately. Still no bites. I guess I just suck. Lol

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Not even going to answer this one

You have a good attractant product, it's not messy, easy to apply gel, doesn't have any dye to stain carpets and doesn't stink!

Why not put in your sales pitch?

Tom

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I think a little added scent does draw a few extra strikes and certainly helps the bass hold onto the lure longer. Mega strike and bang are the two I use most of the time. Smelly Jelly is great too but only when it's cold out.

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