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Jamess

Has Anyone Ever Custom Painted Their Reels?

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There is a Chronarch on ebay painted into a sexy shad patttern.  It is sweet.

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Most of the work would be stripping the reel, and rebuilding it. Main concern with paint would be not putting in on to thick, so you can maintain the tolerances where needed. I have painted a lot of things, never thought to paint my reels.

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I have seen it done and it is a lot of time in prepwork and such like any good paint job. Most who have done it reccomend urethane paint and automotive clear coat to keep the thicknesses down.

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256790w.jpg

Bought this custom Alphas painted by PIZZ customs. Painting a reel could easily cost you $75-100 from a reputable place. This was painted orange and black to match a Champion Extreme.

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Yes, with bass blood... BWAHAHAHAAHAH!

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Must be a fun and rewarding winter hobby.

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256790w.jpg

Bought this custom Alphas painted by PIZZ customs. Painting a reel could easily cost you $75-100 from a reputable place. This was painted orange and black to match a Champion Extreme.

Nice reel, I like that color. I had a couple sols, sold them ( no regrets ) the Fuegos, I do regret selling, lol

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Thanks! The orange color is more or a bright "candy" orange versus the lighter orange found on the Sol. The paint is holding up surprisingly well though the reel is covered when it is not being fished. Looking to add a SV spool to it as well to further the performance as I am just not a big fan of Mag V for general casting use.

 

I wouldn't dare paint a reel myself especially if the reel is nice or valuable. Would consider possibly taking a beater reel and trying it if I had the scoop on paint, the painting process, and supplies.

 

There are a few other members here that have painted reels in their arsenal though I am not sure if they did the paint work.

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I've painted a couple of reels using rattle can automotive paint and clearcoat.  The problem isn't painting the reel, per se.  With care you can strip a reel down to its frame, assuming you also know enough about it to reassemble it afterward.  The real problem is getting paint and clearcoat that will stay on the reel.  JMHO, it's unlikely that you'll find coatings that will not scratch and chip compared to the factory paint.  And yes, you have to pay strict attention masking parts that don't get paint and to the thickness of the coating you apply since it all has to fit together after you paint it.

 

Tried it once or twice, decided it wasn't worth the trouble and result.  I'm more into fishing gear that works than I am into pimping stuff up, but to each his own.

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find a good airbrush artist , i did , i have a Revo Toro 51 painted black , cost me $40 . the guy used automotive paint and automotive clear , has held up pretty good ....

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I don't see why not.  Today's automotive waterborne paints lay out super flat and don't need a lot of material. I'd just find out what the covers are made of treat them accordingly. Scuff it and then spray it. There's all sort of adhesion promoters that will work with raw plastic, aluminum, fiberglass, or whatever composites reels are made of.  I'd say the start up cost will probably make it impractical for most guys.  I would be willing to try it out though.  I sometimes tinker around with stuff at work.  I painted the cowling of my outboard one day and this is how it came out with 10 minutes of a prep.

 

4277C39F-65D3-4316-B423-8E6EF20583D4_zps

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There are a couple places online that do it.  But, if you feel comfortable doing it go for it.

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I will be painting mine soon. Just got a used gen 3 abu revo s, the pearl white tinted to a yellowish and there are chips in the paint on the side plates. I'm going to strip them down with either paint thinner or remover. Whichever doesn't affect the graphite/plastic. Planning on spraying it a WICKED awesome color.. or maybe just redo the white.. we shall see!

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I had one that was painted by a well known painter. I wasn't too impressed with the durability, but it looked great.

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I don't see why not.  Today's automotive waterborne paints lay out super flat and don't need a lot of material. I'd just find out what the covers are made of treat them accordingly. Scuff it and then spray it. There's all sort of adhesion promoters that will work with raw plastic, aluminum, fiberglass, or whatever composites reels are made of.  I'd say the start up cost will probably make it impractical for most guys.  I would be willing to try it out though.  I sometimes tinker around with stuff at work.  I painted the cowling of my outboard one day and this is how it came out with 10 minutes of a prep.

 

4277C39F-65D3-4316-B423-8E6EF20583D4_zps

I have been in the business for over 13 years, and water based paints have a higher material build then solvents. I know this from the many two tone paint jobs I have complete with both, and seeing first hand the much thicker hard line left by water, versus solvent. Not to mention the 100's of other painters I know who have noticed the same thing. Solvent would be my go to for less material build.

Technically speaking you can just look at the reductions of the two, 50% for solvent, 20% for water as a baseline. Also water paint is a lot thicker then solvents, and that is why they can offer better coverage and a filter for spraying.

I would also say that if you put as much clear on a reel as you did your outboard cover, you will have to much material to retain clearances on the faces where they apply.

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I have been in the business for over 13 years, and water based paints have a higher material build then solvents. I know this from the many two tone paint jobs I have complete with both, and seeing first hand the much thicker hard line left by water, versus solvent. Not to mention the 100's of other painters I know who have noticed the same thing. Solvent would be my go to for less material build.

Technically speaking you can just look at the reductions of the two, 50% for solvent, 20% for water as a baseline. Also water paint is a lot thicker then solvents, and that is why they can offer better coverage and a filter for spraying.

I would also say that if you put as much clear on a reel as you did your outboard cover, you will have to much material to retain clearances on the faces where they apply.

Ah, it turns out you're absolutely right. I'm a derp. The only solvent paint we have is 99k and tested this against the water equivalent and it's in fact has a thinner dry film.  I came to the believe that it wasn't because it seemed like I could get the waterborne to lay out flatter than the solvent.  I recently came to automotive from spraying gel coat so I have very limited experience with solvent.  

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Ah, it turns out you're absolutely right. I'm a derp. The only solvent paint we have is 99k and tested this against the water equivalent and it's in fact has a thinner dry film.  I came to the believe that it wasn't because it seemed like I could get the waterborne to lay out flatter than the solvent.  I recently came to automotive from spraying gel coat so I have very limited experience with solvent.  

I don't think your a derp if it has any consolation, I kinda figured you were new. The water will layout nice and flat, unless it goes on dry and I find it great to work with. Other then having to spray it to see the end color it's a great product! I have only worked with gelcoat once, and I hated it lol!

 

From the picture it looks like you can spray like a boss, so I would say you transitioned quite well!

 

I would go with a solvent base, and maybe an acrylic clear not to sure. I would be more worried about the clear building to much, and would do my best to get 1 coat coverage with the base to give me the most room to work with. I would try it out, but I don't feel like tearing my fishing gear apart to paint it.

 

Keep up the good work!

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I have never, as I was always concerned about excessive boat rash.  I would be interested if someone one  would document my worries are unfounded.

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Here's one I did for a friend a while back.

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