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kickmaster691

Pitch And Flipping Spinning Rod.... Help!!!!

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I don't know about pitchin' but I've used a spinning rig lots of times for flippin'. I just strip off however much line I'm going to use then close the bail. I still haven't figured out what is meant by pitchin'. I'm old, go figure.

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try a salt water set up with the rod's lure rating in what you are want to pitch of flip

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Used to fish in a bass club with a guy that used nothing but spinning gear. He had a custom rod built to flip and pitch with and would probably be your best bet. Tough to find a spinning rod heavy enough to do the job.

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You can do anything you want with a spinning rod but heavy cover flipping and pitching isn't one of them. The reason is spinning rods are made lighter, but you may find an in-shore rod that will be stout enough to handle heavy line and ripping large fish out of cover. For the person not understanding pitching, it is a simple method to place the lure softly in a spot that is too far away to flip and too close to cast, 15' is like right out of reach of a decent flip so you would disengage the reel or open the bail on a spinning reel and make a short pitch by lowering the rod to get the bait moving forward and then raising the rod quickly to propel it at a low trajectory so it doesn't splash loudly.

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  Pitching works pretty decently on a spinning rod, I have done it in a pinch.  I prefer baitcast much better for the mentioned techniques, just because I am much more accurate with casting gear, and can pitch much faster and get the bait out there many more times then I could with a spinning setup in a given amount of time.  If your looking for a spinning pitch setup, I would look for a medium heavy rod, many medium heavys are different than others, and not as stout.  You want a stiffer, more stout rod for these techniques, and look for something in the 7' range should cover most of the basic needs.  

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What lure weights and what kind of cover? Those are the important facts that will determine rod weight.

Spinning gear can be used to pitch, I do it all the time but generally with something like a weightless Senko or Shakeyhead in light cover.

The biggest disadvantage of spinning gear in very heavy cover in my view is the lack of mechanical advantage/cranking power in the reel. Typically means you will have to use lighter line and play the fish out more agains the rod, giving them more time to find something to hang you up in. But it can be done, I've stuck 3lb and 4lb large mouth on a weightless Senko in the bases of very gnarly submerged brush and worked them out - good line is key. But in one instance I had to take the boat in close to dig the fish out, the rod (St Croix M/XF) just couldn't overcome the branches.

St Croix makes some pretty stout MH spinning rods in their LTB, Avid X, Rage and other lines rated to 3/4. Kistler has a MH Helium 3 spinning rod rated to 7/8 of an oz as well. Anything heavier then these for truly gnarly cover would be a custom or maybe inshore/musky/salmon type of a rod maybe.

Edit to add Kistler actually makes a MH/XF spinning rod in the Helium 3 line rated 1/4-1oz.

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Of course you can use a spinning rod for flipping, pitching or skipping, they are only casting techniques; the only "limitation" is finding the right power rod ( which most probably won´t find at your local store), in many cases you can order it directly from the manufacturer. 

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I never said anything about being to old to fish, Kick Master. Since Smalljaw explained it, we've been doing that for years. I just thought that was called flippin', too. The younger generation keeps coming up with new terms to describe stuff we have been doing for years. Remember; there is very little under the sun that someone hasn't thought of before.

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I never said anything about being to old to fish, Kick Master. Since Smalljaw explained it, we've been doing that for years. I just thought that was called flippin', too. The younger generation keeps coming up with new terms to describe stuff we have been doing for years. Remember; there is very little under the sun that someone hasn't thought of before.

 

Terminology is hard to keep up with and we often use generic terms for things, like Rat-L-Traps, now every lipless bait is called a trap, or a good example of terminology being changed is the old jig worm, that is now a shaky head and it was once viewed as a new technique but jig worms have been used for years, the only thing new was rigging it weedless instead of threading the worm all the way on and fishing it with an exposed hook.

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Bill Dance did a show about pitching using only a MH fast(er) action spinning rod. If you can find it, it will probably explain it well to you. I'd say a sensitive rod for sure with 20# braid. Use a floro or mono leader if straight braid bothers you. One advantage to spinning gear is it's easier to skip something like a Senko under docks.

 

You see, Dance's shows filmed on private, intensely managed lakes and ponds can be useful to the average angler.

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I never said anything about being to old to fish, Kick Master. Since Smalljaw explained it, we've been doing that for years. I just thought that was called flippin', too. The younger generation keeps coming up with new terms to describe stuff we have been doing for years. Remember; there is very little under the sun that someone hasn't thought of before.

Both the types (flipping - late 70's - Dee Thomas & pitching - early 80's - Dave Gliebe) were brought to life on the San Jauqin - Cal delta. Very similar in practice and both can be done on either a bait casting rod or a spinning rod. Both require a 3 to 4 power rod (mim.) and a reel that will handle 50 lb. braid at the min. As for a spinning rod that will handle these types, an in- shore jigging rod should do the trick, they can handle a 3 to 4 oz. jig and should be able to take care of your problems there. For the reel, check the max drag, chances are your going to have to crank it all the down. You'll want one that will go up to 15 lbs min. drag. The line amount won't matter, you'll only be using 40' max for either method. A 3,000 to 3,500 series (size) should do the trick.

I use a 3 power bait caster for pitching stick baits into grass pockets & 4 - 6 power for 3/4oz. on up. I sell a lot of 1/4 jigs to flippin' fisherman on the same delta along with 3/4 to 1 1/2 oz. jigs. It all depends on the type of cover your going into.

Don't make the mistake that you have to have a "broom stick" to get the job done. Look at the types of cover your dealing with and how your going to work it.

I've fished with Dee several times and Dave is a personal friend who got me into tournament fishing in the late 70's. He also gave me my 1st flippin' stick, It was all glass 2 piece Fenwick rod. This said, look for a heavy rod at either K-mart or Wal-mart. This should keep the cost factor down. $75 to $100 should set you up fine. Many manufactors make a good braid, it all depends on how much you spend.

Hint; Don't use all braid, a good mono backing prior to braid is much better (15 to 20 lb.)

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