Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
blckshirt98

Bass Population Distribution By Weight

Recommended Posts

Does anyone know where any data is available that shows the average distribution of bass in a body of water by size?  So for example in a particular body of water 40% of the bass population can be expected to be under 1 pound, 25% 1-2 pounds, 10% 3-4 pounds.....01% will be over 10 lbs, etc.  I know the max weight will differ according to location since not every lake will carry 10+ pound bass, but i would expect the distribution curve to look relatively the same from one body of water to another.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if you can look at your local DNR website for their latest shocking report. May have some kind of info on number of total fish and then how many were within the certain weight thresholds. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are so many factors, on larger lakes it would be hard to predict what size ranges were most abundant.  It also depends on angling pressure and any slot limits set on that body of water.  It's a little easier on ponds and small lakes.  I know there's some information on size distribution in an article here http://www.bassresource.com/lake-management/ , I just can't find it right now.  Best way to know right now I would say is just fishing it and seeing what you get or relying on information from other anglers or your state's DNR.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

California doesn't stock LMB except the initial stocking and doesn't manage bass populations unless the a specific lake request a electro shocking study.

Some lakes loose entire year classes if the is a draw down for whatever reason during the spawning cycle. Population density changes every year. You can be assured bass over 10 lbs are very rare everywhere and make up the smallest population % and bass between 1 1/2 to 2 lbs make the highest % of bass over 12".

Tom

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It all depends on what the bass and bait is doing at that particular period of time.  In florida the bigger bass will go to where ever the food source is at that time.  They didn't get big by starving!  

In florida if water levels are high big bass will often go into the thickest, shallow flats where they feast on frogs, bugs, snakes, small gators, and of course bait fish.  It is a safe, diet rich environment.  The heavy flipping guys usually bring in big bags of weight in these shallow weed filled flats.

When the water drops in the dry season, the bigger bass seek out deeper pockets, where they are not trapped in the shallow flats.  They didn't get big by being stupid.

Breeding time they seek out areas of the lake with bottom types condusive for bedding.  Shallow hard and sandy bottoms.

Current also has a lot to do with finding bigger fish.  Always interested in an easy meal, big bass will position themselves in slack areas adjacent to current pathways.  Culvert pipes, funnel points between grass islands with wind are good ambush points.

Florida is different then a lot of places around the country because water levels dominate the life cycle so much.  For us deep water is often 10 feet or less and bass spend so much time in 3 feet or less of water.  It is a rich shallow environment where bass grow quick and pack on the pounds.  Our Florida strain bass have been transported all over the country to improve the quality of other populations from Texas to California.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great question.   I wish I knew the answer.

I do recall talking to a conservation officer some years back and we were having a similar discussion.   He said that if your lake is giving up a lot of 2# class bass then it is very healthy and will have much bigger fish as well.

I don't know if this is true, but I liked the way it sounds and tend to believe it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Missouri the Department of Conservation provides annual prospect reports on many of the lakes they manage.  In those reports they provide percentages of fish meeting specific lengths based on shocking samples.  Below is verbiage from one of these reports for a lake known for large bass.      

. . . . contains a bass population that boasted almost 78 percent of the bass measuring over 15 inches, and 21 percent over 18 inches.

Reports like this provide some idea as to the trophy-producing capability of a lake.  Not all lakes have the same capability to support big fish resulting in a higher percentage of shorter fish.  See the report excerpt for another lake below as an example.

Recent surveys reveal high numbers of largemouth bass, with 25 percent of fish over 15” and 10 percent between 18 and 21”. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, senile1 said:

. . . . contains a bass population that boasted almost 78 percent of the bass measuring over 15 inches, and 21 percent over 18 inches.

Wish my waters could boast those class percentages!

Obviously, however they are talking about fish large enough to be susceptible to electro-shocking gear. Really young fish make up the vast majority of a given population. Still, my waters are currently probably at ~25% > 15", 1-3%>18".

In general, sizes go up as we head south. So I guess I should say, 78% of my (adult) fish measure over 12", and 21% are over 15".

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Paul Roberts said:

Wish my waters could boast those class percentages!

Obviously, however they are talking about fish large enough to be susceptible to electro-shocking gear. Really young fish make up the vast majority of a given population. Still, my waters are currently probably at ~25% > 15", 1-3%>18".

In general, sizes go up as we head south. So I guess I should say, 78% of my (adult) fish measure over 12", and 21% are over 15".

 

That lake is an extraordinary example and is known for big fish.  It is also more difficult to catch large numbers of fish in that particular lake.  Many of our waters around here are lucky to have 10 - 15 percent over 15 inches, and some of the lakes have mainly 10 - 15 inch fish.  I just wanted to show examples of these reports as they really help if you are wanting to look for larger fish.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    bass fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    bass fish

    fishing

    fishing poles

    fishing reels
    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×