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lectricbassman

first time builder, need direction

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I think im going to make the jump into rod building!  Since its my first time and im not sure how well it will go im not planning on spending huge amounts of money right away. Im looking at the CRB starter kit from mudhole that comes with the tools, supplies, and crb rod blank etc.  My question is this, how good are the crb blanks?  Would they be an upgrade from the basspro graphite series rods?  And on that note, anyone use the mhx blanks? If so how do they rate?  Lot of questions here and im sure ill need more info and help. Thanks in advance for your help, im excited to make the jump!

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The crb blanks are not a bad budget blank. I like MHX and use a lot of them. They fish well above the price point in many cases. You don't need the wrapper and drier for one rod to test the waters. Hand turning the first one or two teaches you a lot about how epoxy behaves. 

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I agree a hand wrapper is the best way to start, keeps the initial investment small. A dryer is handy when it comes to doing the finish coat but not necessary.

Though honestly, unless you really like that particular lineup of blanks, go with something that you truly like and one you know you will keep using. Or practice your wraps on an old rod / wooden dowel, then pick out a blank that you know you want.

On our first custom build we’re always worried about screwing up but as long as you follow the awesome tutorials out there your first rod will function just fine. That first rod may not be as pretty as some the more experienced builders but it will work just great. Just keep your wraps simple (unless you’ve been practicing on an old rod) and it’ll all work out.

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CRB starter kit will be fine.  Best to not invest a lot until you know where you are going.  With every build you will become better, and more confident to allow you to confidently invest in higher quality/cost blanks and guides.

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I got one  of the MHX kits and i dont think it was to much money.  I am still working at it as i changed to a X25 setup vise the pre-layed out guide train.

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I fished my first MHX blank for ten years before the rod locker ate it.  And then I built an exact replica and am still fishing it.  Watch the Mudhole tutorials over and over.   Then ask as many questions as you want here.  We started at the same place you are, and are more than willing to help.

WARNING - rod building is more addictive than crack, just so you know.

 

FD

 

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Bit of a threadjack, but I was just looking at the same kits as the original poster... so it's not a terrible threadjack.

Can someone give me the 'why I might want to build a custom rod' pitch?  From the outside looking in, the main benefit seems to be just the fun of mixing/matching components or being able to make beautiful cosmetics.  At a function level, though, I can't see what buy a St. Croix blank and putting the guides/grips gives me that buying a factory rod wouldn't.

The closest parallel I can think of is reloading ammunition for firearms where the main benefit is reducing cost (loading your own, if you don't charge yourself much for your labor, is cheap) and the ability to tune loads to your rifle or specific uses that might not be available in factory loads.

 

I don't need another hobby but I'm way curious.

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Buying the blank and building your own gives you the ability to choose everything. The rod length (you can cut or extend blanks), handle type, length, and material. Type of guides and size of guides. You can build an ul spinning rod blank into a bfs casting rod. You can build a mh crankbait rod blank as a spinning rod if you prefer spinning gear. The possibilities are endless and you can have something you want, but can't find in an off the shelf rod. Guide type and size, reel seat material and design, and even the way the rod is wrapped can affect how the rod behaves under load, the balance of the rod, weight of the rod, and the sensitivity of the finished product

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7 hours ago, HeavyDluxe said:

Bit of a threadjack, but I was just looking at the same kits as the original poster... so it's not a terrible threadjack.

Can someone give me the 'why I might want to build a custom rod' pitch?  From the outside looking in, the main benefit seems to be just the fun of mixing/matching components or being able to make beautiful cosmetics.  At a function level, though, I can't see what buy a St. Croix blank and putting the guides/grips gives me that buying a factory rod wouldn't.

The closest parallel I can think of is reloading ammunition for firearms where the main benefit is reducing cost (loading your own, if you don't charge yourself much for your labor, is cheap) and the ability to tune loads to your rifle or specific uses that might not be available in factory loads.

 

I don't need another hobby but I'm way curious.

going with a custom rod , you can pick your own components , namely the reel seat  ! everybody has their own choice for them and most of the time a factory rod has a different one !

 Also handle length , handle configuration ( split , full , tennesse , etc.) , handle material (eva ,cork , hypalon , etc.)

guide set  ( including  guide ring material , guide size , conventional or spiral wrapped)

hook keeper stlye , hook keeper position , hook keeper or no hook keeper

i think you get the point , custom rods for me are the only choice as i will never buy a factory rod ..

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Besides being able to choose everything,  you can build a higher end rod for a lot less if you do the work yourself.

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Maybe not with your first one, but once you get the finer points of design like static testing and reduction trains you'll have a truly maximized fishing tool. 

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One issue not mentioned is that many factory rods are built with cardboard reel seat shims, insufficient epoxy between the blank and the components, and terrible quality cork (look at it closely and you'll see all the filling that has been done to make it look good.  Add this very important workmanship issue to all the others and you'll have a top quality rod that will last forever if taken care of, and it will be exactly what you want.  

One issue of making it what you want is this:  If you know you will be using line no heavier than 15 pound braid on a spin rod you can make the rod with smaller reduction guides than the factory does.  The factory rods have to accomodate all lines, so will most often use larger reduction guides than necessary resulting in  a heavier, less sensitive rod.  

Finally, there is a ot of enjoyment that comes when you finish the rod and take it fishing, knowing that this is your creation.  This is much different than the purchasing of a rod and taking it out the first time.

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I just like trying stuff that the manufacturers will not try. Different handle lengths and reel positions and guide trains. Like said above everything from the big companies has to be standard for everybody to use. If you are using a production rod and something on it gives you an idea. You have the ability to build your idea and actually test it.  

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On ‎9‎/‎19‎/‎2016 at 4:29 AM, MickD said:

One issue not mentioned is that many factory rods are built with cardboard reel seat shims, insufficient epoxy between the blank and the components, and terrible quality cork (look at it closely and you'll see all the filling that has been done to make it look good.  Add this very important workmanship issue to all the others and you'll have a top quality rod that will last forever if taken care of, and it will be exactly what you want.  

One issue of making it what you want is this:  If you know you will be using line no heavier than 15 pound braid on a spin rod you can make the rod with smaller reduction guides than the factory does.  The factory rods have to accomodate all lines, so will most often use larger reduction guides than necessary resulting in  a heavier, less sensitive rod.  

Finally, there is a ot of enjoyment that comes when you finish the rod and take it fishing, knowing that this is your creation.  This is much different than the purchasing of a rod and taking it out the first time.

Mike , i was wondering what the smallest reduction guide you've had sucess with , on a spinning rod of course , i've been using size 20  but was contimplating a size 16 ( Fuji KL-H 16H ) as i use a Pflueger 9525 (1000 size ) and 10 lb braid ,

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3 hours ago, Big Bait Fishing said:

Mike , i was wondering what the smallest reduction guide you've had sucess with , on a spinning rod of course , i've been using size 20  but was contimplating a size 16 ( Fuji KL-H 16H ) as i use a Pflueger 9525 (1000 size ) and 10 lb braid ,

I know you weren't asking me but I've used the 16 - 8 - 5.5 reduction with 1000 size reels and had good results.

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2 minutes ago, basscatcher8 said:

I know you weren't asking me but I've used the 16 - 8 - 5.5 reduction with 1000 size reels and had good results.

probably gonna go 16-10-6-3.5 , my last rod was 20-12-8-6-3.5's

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3 hours ago, Big Bait Fishing said:

Mike , i was wondering what the smallest reduction guide you've had sucess with , on a spinning rod of course , i've been using size 20  but was contimplating a size 16 ( Fuji KL-H 16H ) as i use a Pflueger 9525 (1000 size ) and 10 lb braid ,

A 16/8/5.5H reduction chain works great with light braid

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1 minute ago, Delaware Valley Tackle said:

A 16/8/5.5H reduction chain works great with light braid

what about using 3.5's instead of 5.5's

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3.5 runners are fine as long as you don't need to pass leader knots. A 4.5 will pass them no problem. 

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In 2003 I built my first (a surf heaver).

 

37 rods later I realized I was hooked. 

Tom Kirkman runs rod builder magazine. Each February he puts the International Custom Rod Building Exposition  (ICRBE). The past several years they have been in Winston-Salem. 

I recommend all new rod builders go to this show.  Most blank mfgrs attend with their armadas. This gives you a chance to compare blanks action,  weight and  power. You'll learn a ton from the hands on classes,  as well as getting to see some insane thread work (shout  out to the NERBS!!) And how others do rod building. Also,  you save a ton on shipping so getting 1 piece rods >7' is easier. 

Every reason for building your own is stated above.  As an example I wanted a whacky rod to skip whacky rigs way up under docks. That rod has very little handle to help create tip speed to skip light plastics.

 

Regarding the 3.5mm guides. ..if your using braid,  or fish alot of grass/muck you'll avoid the micro guides 

 

 

Good luck. 

It's really not am addiction,  it's a way of life. 

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On ‎9‎/‎28‎/‎2016 at 1:46 AM, Delaware Valley Tackle said:

3.5 runners are fine as long as you don't need to pass leader knots. A 4.5 will pass them no problem. 

i was talking about transitioning from the size 8 guide as in 16/8/3.5's , i use 3.5's on my spinning rod , i have no problems with passing a uni-to-uni with 10 lb. Sunline SX1 to 6 lb. Sunline Sniper .

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4 hours ago, Big Bait Fishing said:

i was talking about transitioning from the size 8 guide as in 16/8/3.5's , i use 3.5's on my spinning rod , i have no problems with passing a uni-to-uni with 10 lb. Sunline SX1 to 6 lb. Sunline Sniper .

My gut reaction is that the transition would be too abrupt. I don't think the weight difference would be meaningful in that section of the Rod but tape one on and test cast to see first hand . Who knows you might be pleasantly surprised. 

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