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Getting into rod repair/building ~ Advice Needed!

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 I'm seriously looking into starting to do my own work, starting with replacing broken guides and then building my own.  My local tackle store with fixing rods/replacing guides  and unfortunately there is no one within 100 mile radius of me that does.

 I'm a local tournament angler that's a member of a club and fishes pot trails as well,  so not only would I be scratching my own ***** but could be of value as a side business to the local fishermen in my area for repairs and maybe eventually custom rods.

I've been researching and looking at starter kits on mudhole.com and before I pull the trigger on the $150 freshwater starter kit, id appreciate ANY advice, thoughts, etc from the rod building community here!

Thanks in advance for any advice/info!

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57 minutes ago, .ghoti. said:

here's the best advice I can give you

http://rodbuilding.org/list.php?2

 

Thanks for the link....bookmarked!  

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Don't do it.  You'll end up with a shop full of cool tools and no time to build yourself any rods!! Lol!

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Experience speaking, Scott?

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2 hours ago, .ghoti. said:

Experience speaking, Scott?

No, not at all.  I loved converting my theater room in to a rod shop!  Lol

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If selling you'll need to understand the tax law and file (fed excise tax), not sure if that affects repairs, probably not.

You'd better be a LOT faster than I am if you expect to make a profit.  After you build a couple rods and have recorded your time, figure that your time when you get good will be much less, but still may make your rods hard to sell while still making a decent rate for your time.  

I suggest you simply try a few rods for yourself, starting with moderately priced blanks and components, then decide if you really want to go on.  If you have a fishing family, there will  be "demands."  

Keep in mind that if you simply put together a lot of standard components, your rods will not be that distinctive compared to factory rods.  If you custom make grips, butt knobs, do fancy thread wraps, you will have more time in the rods.  Custom dimensions are faster, but still take time to make the decisions and plan the rods.

I think those who actually make a decent profit in rodbuilding are very skilled, very fast,  and very good business people.  You will need to consider that when you sell a rod you are going to be expected to stand behind the rod, and many people don't know how to properly treat a rod.  You WILL get failures.

It may be in your circle that repairs may be more lucrative than building.  Unless your tourney friends get their rods at deep discounts or free.

Big decision, sneak up on it.

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It's a rewarding craft. Go slow and see how you like it. There's a learning curve the steepness depends on the individual. If it morphs and grows into a business great but don't get into it solely for that reason. 

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Mike and Mick just gave you some excellent advice. Dont spend much right off the bat. Wait until you see if this something that warrants spending more. You will know quickly if this thing suits you, or not.

I'm not into this to make money. Its a hobby that almost pays for itself.

if you're looking to make money, you would be better served learn to play guitar.

8 hours ago, S Hovanec said:

No, not at all.  I loved converting my theater room in to a rod shop!  Lol

 And I had a blast turning my cabin into one. It aint finished, and may never be.

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I took a rod building class in 1987.

Time invested is what kept me away from pursuing it further.  I'd rather fish than spend all my time fixing and building for others and I realized that right off the bat.  I didn't think there was a lot of money to be saved or made so I just let it go. But, that was then. 

I do wish I'd done more of it now, just for myself at least because I have 6 months of winter up here and could find some time to put towards it now.  If I lived where I could fish bass year 'round then I'd still not bother with it.  But, would make a good winter hobby now.

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For practice getting started look no further than you own arsenal of rods. If you're anything like me a few of them will be old enough to benefit from new and possibly smaller guides, foregrip removal, Making full cork or eva into split grips... once you start it never stops, but it's a great ride!  These are great days with help and advice at you're fingertips. It sure wasn't always like this.

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