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Can't Catch Bass

Rod line rating vs line used

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Hello, first post here. 

 

I've been looking at rods for fishing cover. The rod I'm looking at is rated for a max of 25# test. I know a lot of you will run straight 50 or 65lb braid on a set up meant for fishing cover.

 

My question is, is there an advantage to fishing this line if the rod is the weakest link and rated for much less?

 

Wouldn't it make more sense to fish that same main line with a flourocarbon leader that matches the rods rating rather that risk damaging the rod while also not compromising the stealth of your presentation?

 

I'm not trying to be confrontational, I'm just trying to understand the mechanics involved.

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If you mean cover like thick vegetation, the heavy braid helps cut through grass, allowing for a stronger hook set, and helps pull fish out of slop or pin it to cover so you can grab it out, without linebreaks.  That's the advantage for heavy braid. I would not use flouro for that situation; and, personally, I would not tie a leader for fishing slop.  That extra knot adds another variable for disaster. 

 

If you meant fishing laydowns/docks, flouro is all you need.

 

If you have the right rod for the application, you don't have to worry too much about breaking your rod. If you have a medium heavy rod with 65lb+ braid punching heavy vegetation, rod choice was a problem to begin with. It can work, but you're asking for trouble.  Really depends on what cover you are talking about here.

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The rod is only rated for 25#. What's the sense in putting 65# braid on it when you could run  25# flouro on it (equal to your rod) instead? I get it that you could squeeze more out of braid. I'm looking for more than that

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Check the diameter of the braid test  you are considering.

 

Then compare the line diameter of the braid with that of the mono or fluorocarbon line you are considering.

 

My 8-pound Gamma Torque braided fishing line has a diameter of .003 which is equal to two pound mono.

 

So I need a rod that can handle two pound mono.

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On a fresh water rod, line wt ratings are practically meaningless. The advantages of braid to bass fishing has nothing to do with pound test.  Use your drag and common sense and your rods will be fine. 

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So the presentation is more negatively affected by the diameter and rigidity of the flourocarbon than it is affected by the opaqueness of the braid?

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On 7/15/2017 at 9:52 AM, James Baur said:

So the presentation is more negatively affected by the diameter and rigidity of the flourocarbon than it is affected by the opaqueness of the braid?

 

There is a lot of disagreement about whether bass are line-shy at all, or if so, when. But in heavy vegetation, opaqueness is pretty much a non-issue -- everything they eat is already scurrying, crawling or swimming through stalks, stems, fronds, leaves of stuff...to the extent that they register the existence of braided line at all, it's just another tendril of something that is in the way.

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I'm going to try to break down the answer to your question as simply as possible.

Don't make any of your choices as far as what kind of line to use in what test based on the test rating of the rod just don't even think about that.

Base Your Rod choices on the techniques and weight of baits that you plan on throwing with said rod.

Base your line Choice as far as kind and pound test on the structure cover and techniques that you are fishing.

Braid is an all-around great line it has the most strength for its diameter it saws through vegetation, it has zero stretch, it is the most limp and supple line thus making it great for baitcast and spinning applications, and it has zero memory and floats making it great for topwater applications.

Fluorocarbon is a specialty line that has low stretch very low visibility in water and it sinks making it good for finesse techniques when you feel fish are line shy. It's great for deep crankbaits and trolling so you know your baits are getting to their deepest depths and it's good for some flipping applications around harder cover cuz it offers good abrasion resistance and is less visible. I also personally think it has better abrasion resistance as far as northern pike or muskie fish with sharp teeth.

Monofilament is a very cost-effective line it also floats and has a lot of stretch it is good for topwater baits with treble hooks crankbaits and applications were you want some stretch so you're not just pulling the hooks out of the fish's mouth or ripping the fish's mouth open.

I hope this helps but I encourage you to search bassresourcecom because line rods and real choice has been discussed on this site ad nauseam and there are people who have provided us with some great information on all these topics to help you make the best decision for your fishing applications.

 

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