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For lack of better words, can someone please explain Line Capacity/Test as if you were teaching a child! I've read many posts on the subject but there's so much fisherman jargon and technical terms that I'm a tad confused. I'm new to fishing in regards to finally purchasing my own tackle, rather then just showing up to the lake/ocean and fishing with a buddy's gear. As an example, I got an amazing deal on a few highend rods and one of the reels I purchased new and nearly free, was a Chronarch 200e7. The specs on the box read:

Nylon Mono / lb. (yds.) -- 8(180) • 10(155) • 14(110)

PowerPro Braided -- 30(190) • 50(120) • 65(80)

Nylon Mono -- 8(180) • 10(155) • 14(110)

Fil Tresse PowerPro -- 30(190) • 50(120) • 65(80)

 

Lol, I'm so confused! Help, please!

 

I'm looking to purchase a Mono, Braided, and Fluorocarbon Line but I don't know what I'm suppose to purchase for this particular reel or the others for that matter.  

 

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The first number is the weight of the line. The second number indicates the capacity the spool will hold for that line in yards.

 

So 8 (180) means the spool for your reel should hold 180 yards of 8# mono. 

That same spool will hold 155 Yards of 10# mono, so on and so forth. 

Hope that helps. 

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6 hours ago, islandbass said:

So 8 (180) means the spool for your reel should hold 180 yards of 8# mono. 

That same spool will hold 155 Yards of 10# mono, so on and so forth. 

 

Thank you, IslandBass... but if I may. So, why would I choose #8 rather than #10? There's obviously a difference between the two, and the difference must be significant enough to have both in production but I'm still confused in that regard. I assume there's some correlation with the '12-20lb' listed on one of my Rods, correct?

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They're just capacity specs so you know how much line you're going to use.  The rod ratings on the other hand are a little more precise, and relate to mono strength.  I wouldn't stray too far off those for mono/copoly/fluoro.  For braid, you're usually matching the line diameter of typical mono.  50# braid is usually around the diameter of 12# single filament lines.  You will set your drag to somewhere around 1/3 the top rating of the rod to avoid risking breaking a rod, since with braid, the rod becomes the weakest link.  When using single filament, the line is the weakest link, so you'll set your drag to about 1/3 the breaking strength of the line.  In a general sense, I do not go below 10# single filament, or 50# braid on a baitcaster.  For typical 2500 size spinning reels those numbers are 8#/20#.

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The choice of line you choose for your reel and this is my humble opinion, is the lightest line you can get away with when you consider the fish you are going to target and the cover you will be facing. For example, if you are going to be finesse fishing in open water with minimal cover targeting small or largemouth bass, you can get away with 8# mono, no problem.  If your are fishing in the pads or heavy cover or bigger fish like a pike or musky, 8# test isn't going to cut the mustard.

 

Cutting to the chase, the line you choose needs to be able to serve you for the species and environment you will face 

 

I also second J Francho's advice about the rod's line weight rating. If it says Line Wt: 8-20lb (it is understood to be mono unless otherwise stated in the rod) it is best to follow it since the rod will function best. You lessen the chances of the rod breaking if the line is rated higher or the rod breaking the line if the line weight is less. Probably won't happen either way but the potential is there. 

 

If you are also new to using a bait cast reel, I strongly suggest you use mono first, even if money is not an object. Mono is cheaper than braid or fc  and because you are likely produce a few glorious bird nests while learning to use a bait caster, you won't feel as bad when you have to cut off all your line because the birds nest was beyond fixing, lol. 

 

I spooled my first casting reel with 30# braid and it was my first time using braid also. My first cast I let go too late and my casting weight slammed into the ground in front of me. Naturally, my thumb wasn't yet educated to stop the spool from spinning and indeed I made a glorious birds nest. I had to respool but chose mono. 

 

Good luck. You're also going to love that reel after you get accustomed to it. One last general nugget . . . Your thumb has to stop the spool from spinning BEFORE your lure hits ANYTHING, be it the water, a shrub on the bank or your neighbor's car if you're practicing in the yard. Feather the spool to a stop or stop the spool dead cold, just make sure you stop it. This will lessen your learning curve. It's simple and I guarantee it. 3 brakes on and 3 off is a good starting point too.

 

Good luck! 

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Great advice ^^^

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5 minutes ago, islandbass said:

The choice of line you choose for your reel and this is my humble opinion, is the lightest line you can get away with when you consider the fish you are going to target and the cover you will be facing. For example, if you are going to be finesse fishing in open water with minimal cover targeting small or largemouth bass, you can get away with 8# mono, no problem.  If your fishing in the pads or heavy cover or bigger fish like a pike or musky, 8# test isn't going to cut the mustard.

 

Cutting to the chase, the line you choose needs to be able to serve you for the species and environment you will face 

 

I also second J Francho's advice about the rod's line weight rating. If it says Line Wt: 8-20lb (it is understood to be mono unless otherwise stated in the rod) it is best to follow it since the rod will function best. You lessen the chances of the rod breaking if the line is rated higher or the rod breaking the line if the line weight is less. Probably won't happen either way but the potential is there. 

 

If you are also new to using a bait cast reel, I strongly suggest you use mono first, even if money is not an object. Mono is cheaper than braid or fc  and because you are likely produce a few glorious bird nests while learning to use a bait caster, you won't feel as bad when you have to cut off all your line because the birds nest was beyond fixing, lol. 

 

I spooled my first casting reel with 30# braid and it was my first time using braid also. My first cast I let go too late and my casting weight slammed into the ground in front of me. Naturally, my thumb wasn't yet educated to stop the spool from spinning and indeed I made a glorious birds nest. I had to respool but chose mono. 

 

Good luck. You're also going to love that reel after you get accustomed to it. One last general nugget . . . Your thumb has to stop the spool from spinning BEFORE your lure hits ANYTHING, be itnthe water, a shrub on the bank or your neighbor's car if you're practicing in the yard. Feather the spool to a stop or stop the spool dead cold, just make sure you stop it. This will lessen your learning curve. It's simple and I guarantee it. 3 brakes on and 3 off is a good starting point too.

 

Good luck! 

 

 

Well said! Easy to comprehend... thanks for your time.

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1 hour ago, J Francho said:

They're just capacity specs so you know how much line you're going to use.  The rod ratings on the other hand are a little more precise, and relate to mono strength.  I wouldn't stray too far off those for mono/copoly/fluoro.  For braid, you're usually matching the line diameter of typical mono.  50# braid is usually around the diameter of 12# single filament lines.  You will set your drag to somewhere around 1/3 the top rating of the rod to avoid risking breaking a rod, since with braid, the rod becomes the weakest link.  When using single filament, the line is the weakest link, so you'll set your drag to about 1/3 the breaking strength of the line.  In a general sense, I do not go below 10# single filament, or 50# braid on a baitcaster.  For typical 2500 size spinning reels those numbers are 8#/20#.

 

Thank you for taking the time to respond to my post...very helpful.

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To make it simple the bait casting reel you purchase works with a wide variety of lines.The reel manufacturer given you some suggestions regarding how much of those specific line choices the reel holds when filled properly. What makes everything difficult is there isn't any standards for line size or diameter, so averages are referenced.

You are a entry level angler, my recommendation is learn to cast your reel using a premium inexpensive mono like 12 lb Berkley Big Game and fill the spool about 1/8" below the rim.

Rods have similar mfr markings regarding line and lure sizes, however a all around bass casting rod for your reel is 6'6" to 7' long, medium heavy (MH) power with fast action. Your combo will perform good with lure weights between 1/4 oz to 1 oz.

Start with this and practice casting your new outfit. Watch vedio's availble on this site to help you get started.

Good luck.

Tom

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