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How does a lake turning over effect the bite

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Lakes are starting to turn over in Central NH and was wondering how it effects you in your region.

The bite has been improving and surface Temps are 75 degrees.

I understand that less oxygenated water will rise, but the bass will be revisiting the flats in a couple weeks.

 

Any input is appreciated.

 

Thanks,Al

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Turnover are common as the day and night temps drop cooling the surface water that sinks because it's heavier then the warmer water underneath. You should be smelling a sulfer type odor and seeing floating dead debrise. The combination of water temperature change and reduced DO levels shuts down feeding activity for a few weeks until the ecosystem settles down. If the lake has flowing water inlets, the creek arms or main river are a good place to fish.

wind blown shoreline tend to raise DO levels and attract bass.

Tom

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I think it is unlikely your lakes are turning over with surface temps as warm as 75. For the lake to turn over, the surface temps have to be colder than the water below the thermocline. Colder water is more dense so it sinks through the warmer water below. In my area, the surface temp has to be near 40 before turn over happens

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What is meant by "lake turnover"? How and why do lakes do this in autumn and spring?

  • The key to this question is how water density varies with water temperature. Water is most dense (heaviest) at 39º F (4º C) and as temperature increases or decreases from 39º F, it becomes increasingly less dense (lighter). In summer and winter, lakes are maintained by climate in what is called a stratified condition. Less dense water is at the surface and more dense water is near the bottom.
  • During late summer and autumn, air temperatures cool the surface water causing its density to increase. The heavier water sinks, forcing the lighter, less dense water to the surface. This continues until the water temperature at all depths reaches approximately 39º F. Because there is very little difference in density at this stage, the waters are easily mixed by the wind. The sinking action and mixing of the water by the wind results in the exchange of surface and bottom waters which is called "turnover."
  • During spring, the process reverses itself. This time ice melts, and surface waters warm and sink until the water temperature at all depths reaches approximately 39º F. The sinking combined with wind mixing causes spring "turnover."
  • This describes the general principle; however, other factors (including climate and lake depth variations) can cause certain lakes to act differently. A more detailed description of the physical characteristics of lakes, including temporal and density interactions, can be found at the Water on the Web site, sponsored by the University of Minnesota - Duluth and funded by the National Science Foundation.
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8 minutes ago, Scott F said:

I think it is unlikely your lakes are turning over with surface temps as warm as 75. For the lake to turn over, the surface temps have to be colder than the water below the thermocline. Colder water is more dense so it sinks through the warmer water below. In my area, the surface temp has to be near 40 before turn over happens

Scott, does wind precipitate this?

The thermocline is at approximately  15' and the temp is reported to be 67.

The lake is spring fed and with water levels at all time highs, I wonder if the current from the dam, could be changing things.....that said, the debris could be from changing water levels..

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Area has a lot to do with it,  in my area it occurs when the water temps hit around 70 - 69 degrees in late October 

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22 minutes ago, Scott F said:

I think it is unlikely your lakes are turning over with surface temps as warm as 75. For the lake to turn over, the surface temps have to be colder than the water below the thermocline. Colder water is more dense so it sinks through the warmer water below. In my area, the surface temp has to be near 40 before turn over happens

 

Super windy/wavy days can turn a lake over in the middle of summer. Where I fish, it's happened the last two years.

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