Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I picked up this little Jon over the weekend for $100.  The owner said that some of the rivets seep and he tried to mitigate it by using an aerosol can of bed liner, which didn't work.  I have ground off the bed liner from the bottom of the boat to bare the rivets.  I plan to use a hammer and dolly to re-seat all of them and then I will seal each with 3M 5200.  I have two problem spots; one is a rivet with a missing head and the other is either a poorly done weld or, more likely, an aluminum rivet that was pounded in with a hammer.  

 

Here are my questions:

1.  Is 3M 5200 strong enough to use to seal the two problem areas with no other repair?  Or do you suggest another fix?  I considered drilling out the the two rivets and hammering in a small carriage bolt (and sealing with 5200).  

 

2.  Is the 3M 5200 tough enough to stay on the bottom of the boat and not get scraped off?  Should I cover it with something?  Paint, bed liner, I even thought about putting some strips of ice and water shield (roofing material) over the rivets after I seal them with 5200.  That stuff sticks to anything and is nearly impossible to scrape off.  It would provide padding and protection for the 5200 and the rivets.  

 

3.  The previous owner also sprayed bed liner on the rivets INSIDE the boat.  That seems pointless since you can't reach the stem of the rivet where it comes through the hull due to the frame ribs.  I do not intend to scrape that and seal the inside with 5200.  I plan to just leave it and put in a plywood floor.  What say you?

 

4.  Is one 10oz tube of 3M 5200 enough to hit all the rivets on the bottom of the boat?

 

I haven't done this before so any suggestions are appreciated!  Thank you

 

Jon1.JPG.b296915a140b099254c28db141c2d48d.JPG

 

Jon2.JPG.ee17366383f61e754d83dd2764c8978e.JPG

 

Jon3.JPG.0222fe97538dd757370a747c9074c3ef.JPG

 

Jon4.JPG.8cfc426701f0cde907da67d8fbf786bf.JPG

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The reason the bed liner didn't work was probably poor surface preparation. The 3M5200 aint gonna hold without proper surface preparation.

 

Beating a rivet with a hammer aint gonna do anything but flatten the head. For a rivet to properly seal you gotta swell the shank in the hole.

 

A little long but this is the proper surface preparation for painting or applying any "sealant".

 

Surface Preparation of Aluminum for Painting

 

Sand paper: 80-100 grit

Scotch-Brite Hand Pads: part # 7447

Conversion coating: acid etch primer/Alodine/Chemfilm

Paint: automotive or marine grade polyurethane

Paint & Coating Stripper: Eldorado Solutions' DoradoTM Industrial Products part # 2021 or 5051

 

Steps

010: Clean the aluminum surface with a good cleaner using Scotch-Brite Hand Pads to remove all dirt, old paint and oxide from the surface. When sanding I prefer 80-100 grit it gives better tooth and paint adhesion.  Sanding must be taken into the best previously adhered surface in order to have the new coat of paint hold properly. Start with an orbital sander; finish by hand with Scotch-Brite Hand Pads. Rinse thoroughly with clean water & let dry completely.

020: Apply a coat of acid etch primer following the mixing and application instructions to the letter.

030: Within 24 hours of applying the etch primer, apply the topcoat finish

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had a friend with an early Tracker Deep V that was a riveted boat.  He fished the PWT and was regularly on very rough water.  We fished Lake Michigan one year and he had a lot of rivets "pop".  He told me the only cure he found that worked was to drill out the offenders and re-rivet.  If necessary he went up a size in the rivet to get them to seal but according to him, he could replace with the same size most of the time.  He had a portable compressor and a heavy duty rivet gun to do his repairs.  FWIW..... 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Catt said:

The reason the bed liner didn't work was probably poor surface preparation. The 3M5200 aint gonna hold without proper surface preparation.

 

Beating a rivet with a hammer aint gonna do anything but flatten the head. For a rivet to properly seal you gotta swell the shank in the hole.

 

A little long but this is the proper surface preparation for painting or applying any "sealant".

 

Surface Preparation of Aluminum for Painting

 

Sand paper: 80-100 grit

Scotch-Brite Hand Pads: part # 7447

Conversion coating: acid etch primer/Alodine/Chemfilm

Paint: automotive or marine grade polyurethane

Paint & Coating Stripper: Eldorado Solutions' DoradoTM Industrial Products part # 2021 or 5051

 

Steps

010: Clean the aluminum surface with a good cleaner using Scotch-Brite Hand Pads to remove all dirt, old paint and oxide from the surface. When sanding I prefer 80-100 grit it gives better tooth and paint adhesion.  Sanding must be taken into the best previously adhered surface in order to have the new coat of paint hold properly. Start with an orbital sander; finish by hand with Scotch-Brite Hand Pads. Rinse thoroughly with clean water & let dry completely.

020: Apply a coat of acid etch primer following the mixing and application instructions to the letter.

030: Within 24 hours of applying the etch primer, apply the topcoat finish

Thanks, I'm aware of the need for proper surface prep.  I've been restoring classic cars and motorcycles since I was young.  Proper surface prep wouldn't have made the bed liner any more useful. It's just the wrong product. I'm more concerned about my lack of knowledge regarding the 3M sealer.  Expert surface prep for high material bonding will be pointless if it will be mechanically removed when the boat gets dragged on the bottom every time I pull it in and out of the water.  

1 hour ago, TOXIC said:

Had a friend with an early Tracker Deep V that was a riveted boat.  He fished the PWT and was regularly on very rough water.  We fished Lake Michigan one year and he had a lot of rivets "pop".  He told me the only cure he found that worked was to drill out the offenders and re-rivet.  If necessary he went up a size in the rivet to get them to seal but according to him, he could replace with the same size most of the time.  He had a portable compressor and a heavy duty rivet gun to do his repairs.  FWIW..... 

I'm really feeling like this is the way to go also.  I'm a "fix it right the first time" person.  Thanks much. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@BigAngus752 lots of guys think bed liner is a cure all but that's not it's intended purpose.

 

3M makes some outstanding products, choosing the right on is key...but you already know this.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Catt said:

@BigAngus752 lots of guys think bed liner is a cure all but that's not it's intended purpose.

 

3M makes some outstanding products, choosing the right on is key...but you already know this.

Well I wasn't sure, but I feel better about the 5200 now.  I've also ordered some closed end rivets to replace a few of them.  No reason to take a chance.  Thanks for the help.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Tracker 1648 MV that is riveted. I've replaced plenty of rivets on my boat (re-did the transom wood, customized a control and stick steer console, custom deck extension/storage, etc.). Anything that was through the hull or under the water line got a solid rivet with a dab of 5200 under the head. All have held great and been leak free for over 5 years of hard running. Everything else (aluminum floor, hatches, etc.) were locked down with closed end blind rivets. I've had a few of these where the heads sheered/popped off over the years, but it's an easy fix. I'd definitely go with solid rivets over closed end blind rivets for anything on the hull bottom or below the water line. I've also had a few factory rivets on the hull bottom that ended up being leaky. Unable to buck the rivets without removing my floor, I coated the heads with 5200 and they have been leak free since. I tore a hole in my hull bottom a few years ago. Had it welded up successfully, but I also covered the weld with 5200 as a little added insurance. I run a 50/35 Johnson jet on my boat in a shallow, rocky river and am routinely bumping rocks/bottom, dragging my boat through gravel bottomed riffles and occasionally hitting a rock/river bottom at speed. Some of the 5200 on the hull bottom has a bit of wear, but overall is in good shape and still leak free. Just my experience with rivets and 5200. Hope it helps.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, BigTerp said:

I have a Tracker 1648 MV that is riveted. I've replaced plenty of rivets on my boat (re-did the transom wood, customized a control and stick steer console, custom deck extension/storage, etc.). Anything that was through the hull or under the water line got a solid rivet with a dab of 5200 under the head. All have held great and been leak free for over 5 years of hard running. Everything else (aluminum floor, hatches, etc.) were locked down with closed end blind rivets. I've had a few of these where the heads sheered/popped off over the years, but it's an easy fix. I'd definitely go with solid rivets over closed end blind rivets for anything on the hull bottom or below the water line. I've also had a few factory rivets on the hull bottom that ended up being leaky. Unable to buck the rivets without removing my floor, I coated the heads with 5200 and they have been leak free since. I tore a hole in my hull bottom a few years ago. Had it welded up successfully, but I also covered the weld with 5200 as a little added insurance. I run a 50/35 Johnson jet on my boat in a shallow, rocky river and am routinely bumping rocks/bottom, dragging my boat through gravel bottomed riffles and occasionally hitting a rock/river bottom at speed. Some of the 5200 on the hull bottom has a bit of wear, but overall is in good shape and still leak free. Just my experience with rivets and 5200. Hope it helps.  

That's perfect.  Thank you

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the same issue on my vhull.   I used flex seal paint and never had an issue again.   I’ve used 5200 in the past on leaky rivets and that worked great also.  

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing forum

    fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing poles

    fishing

    fishing reels

    fishing poles

    fishing

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×
×
  • Create New...