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okrod

Canoe or Kayak

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I was wondering if I could get some advice on whether it's better to fish lakes and ponds from a kayak or a canoe?  

I'm considering a small angler kayak; i.e. L.L.bean Manatee, or a one person canoe.

Thanks,

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I've never been in a kayak. Last year I bought a canoe, a wide tandem model which I use solo, because I bring too much stuff for a kayak. On a busy pond that I often fish, I see more kayaks than canoes.

A solo canoe, as far as I can see, is relatively narrow and would be less stable than a wider canoe, with less storage, but with greater paddling efficiency. How it would paddle compared to a kayak, I don't know.

You have to consider how far you want to go from the launch; my wide canoe is suitable for short distances. How much stability do you want? How much gear will you bring? How heavy a boat can you handle by yourself? Lots of questions, no easy answers, but think before you buy.

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A lot of it depends on your intent.  If you always fish by yourself, then I think a kayak is the way to go.  I can carry a ton of gear in my prowler 13 angler's kayak.  It is a sit-on-top (SOT) so it is extremely stable.  An important thing to note is that kayaks (even SOTs) are much faster than canoes.  So if you happened to be paddling against a canoe with a couple of able paddlers in it, you will still leave them in your wake.

A key thing to consider, is that in kayaks you are in a sitting position.  Go in your back yard, sit with your butt flat on the ground, and you legs straight out in front of you, but slightly bent at the knees.  You will spend 98% of your time in a kayak in this position.  Because of that, it can be hard on your back after a long day.  It also takes practice to get used to casting from this position, and it can be really hard to flip a bait this way.

www.kayakfishingstuff.com has a ton of info.  Good luck.

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I have a Wilderness System Tarpon 120, and really like it.   Its a SOT kayak.  The version i bought, came with three rod holders, and i added a depthfinder.  It only weighs 65 pounds, so it is great if your fishing by yourself.  i can easily toss mine on to the roof of my xterra and walk it to and from the water.  Like snowbass23 said, check out kayakfishingstuff.com.  Great website, with a ton of good info.  

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Thanks for the input guys.  I'll check the site and I'm happy to hear more recommendations if anyone has any.

Okrod

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NuCanoe - canoe/kayak hybrid. Relatively inexpensive, easy to transport, very stable with home-built outriggers/stabilizers, plenty of room, upright sitting like in a canoe, trolling motor capable, lots of room.

post-10941-130162911134_thumb.jpg

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Here's another great option if the lake or pond isn't too large:

I have the H3 Freestyle and I like it a LOT!

post-10941-130162911135_thumb.gif

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if you dont plan on doing class III rapids, check out the native ultimates. super stable canoe/kayak hybrid that you can stand in.

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i have a kayak, here is a picture of mine, a heritage 12' featherlite angler edition sit in kayak

IMG_6963.jpg

if you are fishing by yourself you want a kayak, it is more manuverable and less heavy than a canoe depending on the model that you buy.

However you need to decide between a sit on top kayak and sit in kayak.  If you are doing a lot of freshwater fishing you might want a sit-in kayak to keep dirty water out that is likely to get all over your legs in a self-bailing sit on top kayak.  If you plan to do ocean fishing, you want a sit on top kayak.  A sit-in kayak is most likely lighter in weight and in many cases a faster boat than sit on top kayaks.

if you plan on fishing with a friend often, you may want a canoe, two kayaks or a jon boat....

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You guys have been awesome with the feedback.  

I bought a L.L. Bean Manatee today.  It's not the fishing model, so I have to do some rigging, but it was relatively cheap.  

Thanks.

Okrod

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kayaks are more stable and easier to get maneuver then a heavy canoe.  Canoe you can put more stuff in, but that also means more weight for you to paddle too.  I have a Otter XT, and I mounted a rod holder in front of the cockpit, I drilled a hole and glued a screw in place and I use a wing nut to hold the rod holder in place so I can remove it if I want to.

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I was thinking about a rod holder with a c-clamp to attach to the rim.  This way I can move it or remove it.  

Do you have a picture of how you rigged yours?

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One additional thing to consider is wind. Kayaks sit lower, and are less effected by wind. SOT's are very stable, and you can flip your legs over the side if you want. SOT's have lots of deck space to mount whatever you need.

As far a s rigging,I have a liquid logic SOT yak (12'), rigged to the hilt for fishing, and have also used a canoe prior. I have a triple scottys center console with a 4" extender, which holds two rods holders, and my hummingbird piranahmax portable fish finder. The extender keeps the center console high enough so it does not hit my feet. I have an anchor trolly rigged across the entire left side, with a flush anchor cleat. A paddle keeper is mounted on the right side, and its a quick one handed motion to lock it down. I mounted the fish finder transducer to the rudder block in the back (no rudder), and ran the cable through the hull. In back, I have a flush mount rod holder mounted, plus a milk crate, with two more holders for a net or another pole. If you do rig a YAK, and use a baitcaster, consider not having two much sticking out, so you can clear those "proffesional overruns" without snagging.

I love my yak, and have spent 6 hours in water without a break. It is extremely comfortable for my 6'1, 240lb frame. Mine weighs in at ~50 pounds rigged, and is easy to put on the roof of my 2dr coupe.

kayaks are more stable and easier to get maneuver then a heavy canoe. Canoe you can put more stuff in, but that also means more weight for you to paddle too. I have a Otter XT, and I mounted a rod holder in front of the cockpit, I drilled a hole and glued a screw in place and I use a wing nut to hold the rod holder in place so I can remove it if I want to.

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