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ArcticCat500

Old Town @ Dicks Sporting Goods

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I stopped by the local DSG and found an Old Town/Field & Stream Kay-Noe, this thing was 15ft long and wide as hell, anybody seen, owned or even fished in one?  Looking for opinions on it.

TY

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I have this version.  

http://www.oldtowncanoe.com/canoes/generalFamily/camper_15.html

I really like it, but it does have its limitations.  Canoes are best on calm days or in gentle breezes.  The wind raises Cain with them.  

I fish in one.  Some like kayaks better, but I prefer the canoe.  You can carry more gear and goods.  Don't advise standing in it.

DSC03358.jpg

Nine rods, three tackle boxes, a fish finder, a five gallon bucket to use as a wind anchor, and another holding a ten pound mushroom anchor.

The paddle stows to my right, and the landing net to my left.

I can do everything without leaving my seat, while I am on the water.

As rigged, it's a one man boat.  I can remove the rod holders, making it usable for two in a matter of a few minutes.  Can't take as many rods then.

Great on small bodies of water or fishing sheltered coves and shores of larger ponds and lakes.

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I've seen it, looks OK, but heavy.  As for canoe vs. yak, Its a personal preference.  I can carry as much as above,  and I can stand.  Canoes are far less stable than a wide beam SOT fishing yak.  They handle the wind much better.  I carry two sizes of drift socks and an anchor.  A kayak takes less energy to paddle.  Some people are comfortable in canoe, as it feels bigger.  With a canoe, you can fish with a partner if desired.  Pluses and minuses to each.

354586701_gxURg-M.jpg

354586270_UMpUy-M.jpg

354586387_MYPi2-M.jpg

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thats a great job on that canoe, did you build the rod racks? I use to fish a Great Canadian for years and never a bit of trouble, I'd stand and practically walk about it, not the stability of a JB for sure but alone I never had a problem, and when fished with a friend no trouble then either. I like the thought of this thing, seems easy to handle and looks pretty sturdy, I just wish I could find someone out there with 1, take a look at the you tube vide, just imagine it 15ft and wider with a flat back for a motor.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XNKCqX24aM

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Is it really that stable it looks to me that you would fall out the minute you set a hook

Really, its that stable. It has a 34" beam, and what amounts to a long sponson running up either side of the hull.

Another, right before a hook set:

354586115_eJeb3-L.jpg

And a shot of it on my car:

280640184_CPCcR-M.jpg

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I really like it, but it does have its limitations.  Canoes are best on calm days or in gentle breezes.  The wind raises Cain with them.  

I've used a canoe for two years now. Yes, the wind can blow me around at trolling speed, but that's one of the tradeoffs. Anchoring is a PITA, but I fish shallow, soft-bottomed water and the anchor holds very well. Also, slime mats or thick lily pads can serve as anchors.

I fish in one.  Some like kayaks better, but I prefer the canoe.  You can carry more gear and goods.  Don't advise standing in it.

I agree, even though John can carry a lot of stuff in his kayak. I also like the fact that I have such easy access to everything I bring. Mine is pretty wide and I can stand in it, but I don't very often. The width makes it very stable, but the tradeoff to that is paddling inefficiency.

I don't want to get into the canoe-vs.-kayak thing, to each their own,  but for me my two choices were either an ultralight Kevlar canoe or nothing.

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thats a great job on that canoe, did you build the rod racks? I use to fish a Great Canadian for years and never a bit of trouble, I'd stand and practically walk about it, not the stability of a JB for sure but alone I never had a problem, and when fished with a friend no trouble then either. I like the thought of this thing, seems easy to handle and looks pretty sturdy, I just wish I could find someone out there with 1, take a look at the you tube vide, just imagine it 15ft and wider with a flat back for a motor.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XNKCqX24aM

Yes, I built them. This is the second incarnation. The first prototype was fine, but had some minor flaws. The spacing on the forward rack was not correct. Ditto for the larger rack for the butts. The cutouts were a little too close together.

I used a piece of 1/2 inch plywood that was hanging around. The new version is made of cabinet grade birch plywood. 1/2" is nine ply. Seven core layers and two veneer layers. Much nicer for this type of job.

The other rack could hold eight rods, and the paddle in the center of them. The old forward rack had a straight top, the new version is crowned. It's a cheat to provide a longer surface than straight. It allows for a bit more space between the tips that way.

Esthetically it is more pleasing, to me anyway.

Took more pains. Used a drill press and a jig to hold the rack so all the dowels lined up nicely. The prototype was done with a hand drill. Looked like it needed an orthodontist. But it worked.

The best part is the white cushion for the butts. It is weatherstripping. But it is neat, clean, tough and durable. Got it at Home Depot. It's Frost King EPDM Rubber Weatherseal. 5/8" wide by 5/16" thick. Its ribbed. Will not harden, crack or freeze and retains its shape in sub-zero temps. It's a lot like a gasket on a fridge.

Self stick. Peel the tape off the back as you go. I've given it a pretty good tug, and it does not separate from the wood. In fact, when applying it, if it touched a surface it wanted to stay.

Several coats of marine polyurethane on the pieces. That way, it cannot absorb moisture which could get to the weatherseal, and perhaps ruin the bond.

To protect the rod tips, I used a piece of 3/8" clear plastic tubing. I made a cut lengthwise so it could be slipped over the pegs. Then I marked where each peg was, drilled at the marks, then slipped the tubing over the pegs. A couple of pan head phillips stainless steel screws at each end secured it nicely. Between that screw and the peg on each end, I put another screw, leaving 1/4" between the head and the plastic tubing.

Hook a canopy bungee cord on that screw, stretch it across the rods and hook it over the screw on the other end. When transporting the canoe, it prevents them from bouncing out or chattering and getting scuffed. Just prior to launch, I remove the bungee.

At the butt end, I have a dowel between and below each rod that is angled downward at the tip. When fishing, I hook a bungee at each end and across the rods. If I tip, it will keep them with the canoe.

When traveling, I hook the bungee over every other rod. Makes them very snug in the rack.

What might not show in that photo is the cord that goes to the tackle box under the front seat. I use it to pull the tackle box to me, then use the paddle to slide it back. It's the perfect height to stow under the seat, and slide beneath the center thwart.

One other thing. What is the front seat as I use it, is really the rear seat. It balances better because the front seat is closer to the center of the canoe. The canoe is pretty near symetrical so it handles just as well.

The canoe in that video is 6 to 8 inches wider than the Old Town I have.

I capsized mine once last summer. Stupid me, I was poking at something with the paddle and I stretched out over the side of the canoe. Splash. When I fell out, it righted itself, but I had to gather a couple of the tackle boxes, the paddle, and the landing net.

Fortunately I was only in about four feet of water. I bailed it out, walked it to shore, got everything organized, boarded it, and continued fishing. That will not happen again.

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Tom, your canoe is beautifully rigged, and thanks for the detailed explanation of your mods.  

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I really like it, but it does have its limitations. Canoes are best on calm days or in gentle breezes. The wind raises Cain with them.

I've used a canoe for two years now. Yes, the wind can blow me around at trolling speed, but that's one of the tradeoffs. Anchoring is a PITA, but I fish shallow, soft-bottomed water and the anchor holds very well. Also, slime mats or thick lily pads can serve as anchors.

I fish in one. Some like kayaks better, but I prefer the canoe. You can carry more gear and goods. Don't advise standing in it.

I agree, even though John can carry a lot of stuff in his kayak. I also like the fact that I have such easy access to everything I bring. Mine is pretty wide and I can stand in it, but I don't very often. The width makes it very stable, but the tradeoff to that is paddling inefficiency.

I don't want to get into the canoe-vs.-kayak thing, to each their own, but for me my two choices were either an ultralight Kevlar canoe or nothing.

The pond I fish most has a rocky shore. The east side of the pond is mostly farm fields. The west side is heavily wooded with a few homes. However, there are stone walls running through the areas around the pond which tells me that the woodlands were once all open fields.

I suspect the rocks around the pond are the result of farmers clearing those fields. On average, once you get 20 to 30 feet from the shore, the bottom is soft mud. There are also a few "jetties" that run out from the shore, which are obviously man made. But not recently.

The shore is thick with vegetation.

DSC00054.jpg

One of my tricks, if the wind tries to blow me along the shore is to back the canoe into this vegetation (thick lily pads, and water hyacinth work as well), then fan cast the area thoroughly. Move 30 - 40 feet and repeat the process. It works very well.

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I do the same type of thing in the yak, except I use the skeg to hang in the pads and anchor the boat.  I also will use the paddle as a mud anchor, like flats fishers do.  In open water, I have an 8# mushroom, a small grappling anchor, or a drift sock to slow the drift.

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I do the same type of thing in the yak, except I use the skeg to hang in the pads and anchor the boat. I also will use the paddle as a mud anchor, like flats fishers do. In open water, I have an 8# mushroom, a small grappling anchor, or a drift sock to slow the drift.

Too cheap to buy a drift sock. Yeah, I know all that spent on equipment and too cheap..........................

I use a five gallon bucket with a three line harness to its mouth. Really slows the drift and keeps the boat from swinging back and forth.

Costs nothing, plus it provides storage for bottles of water and miscellaneous stuff. Drilled four one inch holes in the bottom. I figured a round parachute spills air through a hole in the top for some reason, possibly to keep it more stable. It should work on a bucket as well. It is stable. Because of the holes? Who knows?

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Too cheap to buy a drift sock.
LOL, I hear ya.  If it works.... ;)

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I have to admit those are some sweet fishing machines outside the normal JB's n all.

Here's a picture of the boat/canoe/kayak whatever you'all wana call it, they label it as a Kay-Noe. Lotta room and looks pretty good

boat-1.jpg

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I have to admit those are some sweet fishing machines outside the normal JB's n all.

Here's a picture of the boat/canoe/kayak whatever you'all wana call it, they label it as a Kay-Noe. Lotta room and looks pretty good

It should work just fine. Square stern, ready for trolling or small outboard motor. I notice it has a bit of a keel, which is also good. It will greatly reduce sideways drift in a breeze, and also help it track better when under power.

I'm guessing, but it looks like you could stand in it to fish. I'd suggest doing it in shallow water until you get your sealegs under you, just in case.

Looks versatile. I'd say it will work just fine as long as you stay within its limitations. It'll give you many, many hours of pleasure.

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I have to admit those are some sweet fishing machines outside the normal JB's n all.

Here's a picture of the boat/canoe/kayak whatever you'all wana call it, they label it as a Kay-Noe. Lotta room and looks pretty good

It should work just fine. Square stern, ready for trolling or small outboard motor. I notice it has a bit of a keel, which is also good. It will greatly reduce sideways drift in a breeze, and also help it track better when under power.

I'm guessing, but it looks like you could stand in it to fish. I'd suggest doing it in shallow water until you get your sealegs under you, just in case.

Looks versatile. I'd say it will work just fine as long as you stay within its limitations. It'll give you many, many hours of pleasure.

If I do go for it it'll be in the spring....Im just trying to aviod the whole trailer thing and find something a little longer...I've fished in canoes for years, but you're right, I'd need to get my seallegs back..lol

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Looks like you found the boat ;).  I dig it, looks pretty good.  Here is your PFD: http://www.kayakfishingstuff.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=Extrasport-Osprey&Category_Code=PFD

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Arctic Cat - I have that EXACT canoe ;D

I'll start with the good - it's extremely stable, and you have plenty of space to fish two people very comfortably. My brother and I fish out of it all the time, and both of us can stand and fish comfortably. However, we have been fishing canoes since we were little kids, so we do have good canoe balance. I can see if you fish with someone with poor balance or with a very tall person, that you couldn't both stand. However, it is very stable for a canoe.

It holds pretty well in the wind because it's pretty heavy for a canoe, and it tracks well with a trolling motor. Weight load isn't an issue - I think you could load it with coolers of water and it would be fine.

For the most part, I love it. A couple problems, however. First, the back bottom is very thin plastic, and due to very slight dragging, I actually got a couple tiny holes. I have been using duct tape to keep them shut, but I do have waterproof epoxy and some other stuff to fix it permanently.

Lastly, the material is obviously pretty cheap (hence the price of the canoe). It bends too easily, which poses a bit of a problem when strapping it on your car. When you cinch your straps down tight, the canoe kind of bends, so you have to find a happy medium.

If you have any specific questions, ask away. For the price, you really can't beat this canoe though. I highly recommend it.

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By the way, these canoes used to be "Quest" company. Now they've changed, but it's the exact same canoe.

This spring I plan on getting the one-seater so I can take it to remote places by myself. Can't wait  8-)

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Its the other way around, Tony.  Quest is/was Dick's Private Label.  Old Town made them for Dick's.

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Ehh, not a big fan of kayaks. My personal reasons for preferring a one-seater canoe:

You can store more crap, and not worry about anything falling out of it.

Canoes seem all-around more stable, although the one in your link does look pretty stable.

You stay drier in canoes, both with the wave factor and while paddling.

It's much easier to mount a trolling motor on a canoe.

It will be easier to strap a one-seater canoe to my car than a kayak. I don't want to get a kayak rack, although I know it is possible to strap one down without a rack.

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You stay drier in canoes, both with the wave factor and while paddling.

quote]

That's for sure, but it has more to do with the paddling. I tried one of our kayak paddles with the canoe, ONE TIME! Thought it would move the canoe faster, which it did.

The bugaboo was that water would run from the paddle to my hand, then onto my lap with every stroke from both sides. I altered my paddling and gave the paddle a shake every time I lifted it from the water. That more than offset the advantage gained.

My one mistake was I got wooden paddles for the canoe. Since I frequently fish right along the shore, there are times I pole as much as paddle.

I beat one paddle into ruination last year. I can grind it and build it back with fiberglass, but had I started with plastic, it would have been dinged and scuffed, but still usable. Wood is great until you remove the protective finish, be it varnish, paint or polyurethane.

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The bugaboo was that water would run from the paddle to my hand, then onto my lap with every stroke from both sides.
That's what drip rings were made for: http://www.kayakfishingstuff.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=Can-DripRing&Category_Code=pdl

 ;)

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