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Rubi22

Baitcaster woes

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Got a baitcaster, went to try it out, got aggravated with the birds nests, yadda yadda yadda... That'll take some practice (tips are appreciated).

The problem I'm having is trying to cast it. Do I cast sideways? From the ground up? Totally horizontal? Everytime I try to cast (on my right side), the lure shoots far left. Almost like I need to compensate for the overshoot to the left. I know I'm doing something wrong. Is my tension too tight/loose? I would've just tested it out, but the more I practiced, the more time I had to sit and pull out birds nests, so I'd rather have a starting point.

For the record, this is my combo in the 6'6" size:

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Nevermind, I can't post links. It's a quantum bill dance series in the 6'6" size (~$60)

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Rubi22,

First, read this thread............

http://www.bassresource.com/bass_fishing_forums/YaBB.pl?num=1151590913

Then start over with very short casts with great attention to controlling the spool with your thumb. Start by letting the lure/weight just fall to the floor and stopping the overrun with your thumb. Then try pitching a short distance, again with much attention to controlling the spool with friction from your thumb. Forget about long distance casting until you can control the spool with your thumb. concentrate on short controlled casts. You can master this in less than an hour if you practice properly. Keep at it and practice, practice, practice. Before you know it, you will be a master.

Ronnie

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Ive got one of those. I would start with a heavier lure/practice plug and work your way down to light weight stuff. And your right it takes a lot of practice.

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Here the direct link to the article in the thread listed...This should be a good starting point... ;)

Basic Baitcast Reel Setup 101..

Practice, Practice, Practice!

Tight Lines!!!

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Got a baitcaster, went to try it out, got aggravated with the birds nests, yadda yadda yadda... That'll take some practice (tips are appreciated).

The problem I'm having is trying to cast it. Do I cast sideways? From the ground up? Totally horizontal? Everytime I try to cast (on my right side), the lure shoots far left. Almost like I need to compensate for the overshoot to the left. I know I'm doing something wrong. Is my tension too tight/loose? I would've just tested it out, but the more I practiced, the more time I had to sit and pull out birds nests, so I'd rather have a starting point.

For the record, this is my combo in the 6'6" size:

---------------------------------------------------------

Nevermind, I can't post links. It's a quantum bill dance series in the 6'6" size (~$60)

A side arm cast from a right handed person going left means that the angler is letting go of the spool TOO late. You ought to consider yourself lucky that you didn't cast overhand. The lure might smash into the ground 10' in front of you. ;D

If you are coming from a spinning background, you are going to need to train your thumb to release the spool ever so much earlier that your fore finger leaves the rod on a spinning rig.  Trust is letting go earlier. It will feel initially uncomfortable, but that will soon end.

Also, try to practice with at least 1/2 oz.  Going lighter than that is going to make it harder for a newbie.  Practice the overhand cast first.  If you master that, the side arm (easier to learn) cast will come naturally.

Remember, the release time is earlier in the cast than with a spinning reel.

Good luck and don't give up. ;)

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Not to thread jack, but while we are on the subject...

Does the amount of line have anything to do with Back Lashes? I have never had a problem with my Quantum Energy Bait Caster. Until recently that is. I lost quite a bit of line. I wasn't paying attention and I got a Bird's nest from hell. I cut it out and continued fishing. Now it seems like the reel wants to Back Lash all the time. I have a lot less line on the reel. I will be re-spooling this week with new line, but I am inquisitive none the less as to whether it has anything to do with the Back Lashes.

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A side arm cast from a right handed person going left means that the angler is letting go of the spool TOO late. You ought to consider yourself lucky that you didn't cast overhand. The lure might smash into the ground 10' in front of you. ;D

If you are coming from a spinning background, you are going to need to train your thumb to release the spool ever so much earlier that your fore finger leaves the rod on a spinning rig.  Trust is letting go earlier. It will feel initially uncomfortable, but that will soon end.

Also, try to practice with at least 1/2 oz.  Going lighter than that is going to make it harder for a newbie.  Practice the overhand cast first.  If you master that, the side arm (easier to learn) cast will come naturally.

Remember, the release time is earlier in the cast than with a spinning reel.

Good luck and don't give up. ;)

Thank you, that's the response I needed  ;)

And yes, I came from a spinning-reel background. I'll give that a try within the next few days.

Next question: How do I fix a bad backlash? I bought a spool of 50lb Power Pro, and one of the backlashes I encountered was so bad that I had to (I think I had to) cut until the problem was solved. Unfortunately the problem was solved when my entire reel was bare and all my line was in 100 pieces. It was only about 75-100 yards.

Edit: I forgot to add that the last question was for future knowledge so I don't get aggravated and waste a bunch of line.

BTW, now that I'm out of line, what's a decent pound-test for that reel (braided)?

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As far as "fixing" backlash, just pick and pick it at. Pull here, lift that, yank this.... You could take the spool out and work on it if you have easy access.

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A side arm cast from a right handed person going left means that the angler is letting go of the spool TOO late. You ought to consider yourself lucky that you didn't cast overhand. The lure might smash into the ground 10' in front of you. ;D

If you are coming from a spinning background, you are going to need to train your thumb to release the spool ever so much earlier that your fore finger leaves the rod on a spinning rig. Trust is letting go earlier. It will feel initially uncomfortable, but that will soon end.

Also, try to practice with at least 1/2 oz. Going lighter than that is going to make it harder for a newbie. Practice the overhand cast first. If you master that, the side arm (easier to learn) cast will come naturally.

Remember, the release time is earlier in the cast than with a spinning reel.

Good luck and don't give up. ;)

Thank you, that's the response I needed ;)

And yes, I came from a spinning-reel background. I'll give that a try within the next few days.

Next question: How do I fix a bad backlash? I bought a spool of 50lb Power Pro, and one of the backlashes I encountered was so bad that I had to (I think I had to) cut until the problem was solved. Unfortunately the problem was solved when my entire reel was bare and all my line was in 100 pieces. It was only about 75-100 yards.

Edit: I forgot to add that the last question was for future knowledge so I don't get aggravated and waste a bunch of line.

BTW, now that I'm out of line, what's a decent pound-test for that reel (braided)?

Ha! You've got to be kidding! I did the exact same thing when I first was learning with 30# ppro. It was my first time trying braid.  One big cast, one major bird's nest, one spool gone, and the fastest $12.00 I ever spent. From that point, I realized the excellent economics of mono for the purposes of learning.  ;D

Here is a method from Bill Dance that surprisingly works very well, except I suppose for the worst of the worst backlashes but it really does work. This is coming from someone who thought it was a bunch of hooey until I tried it myself.

Here is the method to fix a backlash without picking it out:

1. Do not attempt to pick out backlash

2. Tighten drag to the max

3. Place thumb on spool firmly

4. Crank hard a few times

5. Disengage spool and pull line out

6. Repeat if needed.

One other thing I've discovered. If the nest is so ugly and you're at home, my solution is to remove the spool from the reel.  It is very easy to undo a bird's nest from that point.

It would be easier on your wallet if you spooled on 10-14# mono while you learn. Save the braid until you master the mechanics.

Thinner lines are harder to learn with in the beginning as is using lighter (1/4 oz or less) weights.

Also, keep your spool at optimum capacity. This also helps the learning process.

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Try trilene XT in 14# test....This line is in my opinion one of the friendliest newbie using line for baitcasters.I still have this line on one of my baitcasters and still love it.

Braid and fluorocarbon is a whole another ballpark of line on baitcasters. Requires a bit more experience,least on my part it did.

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One problem with backlashes and mono is if they are very bad/tight it will damage your line. With experience you will know when it is better to "cut" your losses so to speak. This comes from experience of picking out a nasty nest and then on the next cast feeling my line part and my expensive lure sailing off into the distance! The post above about releasing just a little sooner is probly the best info you received. If casting overhead release your spool when your rod is pointed straight up (12 o'clock). Once you get the hang of it pick up your old spinning reel and make a cast. Your lure will probly go higher than it will go toward your target. ;) Probably a med action rod will help initially too.  lp

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If casting overhead release your spool when your rod is pointed straight up (12 o'clock). Once you get the hang of it pick up your old spinning reel and make a cast. Your lure will probly go higher than it will go toward your target. ;) Probably a med action rod will help initially too. lp

That is the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth! The first couple of casts might have rainbow trajectories when switching from casting to spinning in the beginning. ;D

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Re: getting backlashes out.  One way that sometimes works pretty well is to scrub back and forth with your finger nail back and forth across the spool/line surface where the "hangups" are.  This sometimes gets you out of one or two, then keep repeating the process.

If this doesn't work, gently pulling on the loops you find with a small crochet hook is an effective strategy.  You don't want to pull hard on anything with a backlash, especially if you are using flouro as it is quite easily damaged if kinked.  And pulling hard can tighten up the tangles making them harder to get out.

Others have suggested using mono until you get confident, and I agree.  12-14# mono usually casts pretty well, and it's a lot cheaper, and if cutting is necessary, a lot easier to cut than braid.

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something that helped me when learning to cast over hand was to hold the reel sideways. i learned to sidearm fairly easy but couldn't overhand to save my life. i'm pretty sure it's been said but it's worth repeating: PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE

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Before attempting to pull a backlash out apply pressure with your thumb to the spool and it will allow many backlashes to untangle themselves. you must apply the thumb pressure before you attempt to pull it out or it will allow the line to cross over itself and renders the procedure useless. Try it next time and I think you will be suprised at how mant times it will pull right out.

that being said sometimes the only thing to cure it is a good cutting instrument and a respool. Keep fresh line on your reel and it will solve a lot of problems.

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Got a baitcaster, went to try it out, got aggravated with the birds nests, yadda yadda yadda... That'll take some practice (tips are appreciated).

Rubi22, try this, cast as far as you can, then peel off about 6 more feet of line, now get some electric tape and cover the line on the spool with the tape. The line can't go any further then the tape, this will stop your backlashing, as soon as you feel confident casting take the tape off.

Good Luck

 Joe

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