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Mike 12345

Flipping / Pitching Rod Length - Is more better?

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I've been shopping around, looking at different brands, lengths etc for an upcoming flipping/pitching rod.  I notice that, in flipping rods,  they seem to be in lengths from around, 7' then maybe 7'6, and then even longer.  The longer ones, even with the same 'MH , XF' (generally) rating as the shorter ones, tend to be intended for lighter lures/plastics/jigs.

Is there a benefit to getting one that is, say 7'11 in length over a 7 foot rod?  I know that you could theoretically flip further with a longer rod, I'm just asking whether getting the longer one would be a regret down the road.

Holding them each at the same time, my initial thought is that it might be easier to flip/pitch using the longer one.

(Note:  I don't really envision trying to work a jig much over 1 oz, at least not in the near future-  probably the laydowns, overhanging cover and docks I'd generally work would be 0 -10 ft)

Any input would be appreciated-

Mike

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I don't think the length has much to do with casting distance, above 6'6". it does make flipping a little better. I like the longer rods to be able to get a good hookset on and lift the fish up and over in one motion without reeling in like a madman.  No high speed reel can add as much acceleration as an extra 6" to the end of the rod.

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For me flipping is easier with my 7'6" and pitching with one that is I think 6'11."  It's just easier for me to pitch with the slightly short rod. However, I do prefer one that is over 6'6" for pitching. I have one that is 6'9" that works pretty well. Only problemm with the rods I have is I do lose sose some leverage if I am pitching into heavy cover.

I think with flipping the added length is nice becuase the rod and help you control some the line you have out and put you that much closer to your target.

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I don't think the length has much to do with casting distance, above 6'6".

Flipping, the longer the rod the better. More line out=longer flips.

Pitching has a lot to do with the boat's height in the water. If you are in a jon is is easier to pitch with a shorter rod. If your in a big boat you can use a longer rod to your advantage.

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I pitch from a jon, my SOT yak, and from TX style bass boats. Makes no difference to me, although its most comfortable from my yak or the bass boat.

If you notice, I said a longer rod makes flipping easier, which is what you said anyway, LOL. If you can't pitch a bait with a 6'6" rod, you need to work on your technique. Pitching and flipping are totally different techniques, both of which I actually employ quite a bit, and not just for bass fishing.  The flip is great for float fishing for trout.

I'm not sure why you need "longer" flips, as I generally reserve this for vertically flipping the bait into somewhat shallow pockets. The amount of line you you can strip off the reel is limited by your arms length, not the length of the rod. A longer rod gets you further from the boat.

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I pitch from a jon, my SOT yak, and from TX style bass boats. Makes no difference to me, although its most comfortable from my yak or the bass boat.

If you notice, I said a longer rod makes flipping easier, which is what you said anyway, LOL. If you can't pitch a bait with a 6'6" rod, you need to work on your technique. Pitching and flipping are totally different techniques, both of which I actually employ quite a bit, and not just for bass fishing. The flip is great for float fishing for trout.

I'm not sure why you need "longer" flips, as I generally reserve this for vertically flipping the bait into somewhat shallow pockets. The amount of line you you can strip off the reel is limited by your arms length, not the length of the rod. A longer rod gets you further from the boat.

:-? I flip a lot and do not understand vertical flipping, Are you tossing a bait into pockets right at your boat???

I'll show you length matters: Flipping Contest, both of us in the same boat you with a 6'6'' heavy rod me with any 8 foot heavy, see who does better :)

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I've never flipped or pitched with a rod shorter than my 7'6" but I can see how longer would be better, longer range and you can also take up a lot more line on the hookset.

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Flippin' = 7'6"

Pitchin' = 6'6" or 7'....the shorter 6'6" rod lets me get in closer to docks when I'm pitchin into 2" and 3" gaps plus it doesnt get in the way as much on hooksets when most of the rod is under the dock. Its just less rod to handle in tight spots.

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pigsticker, i think you are mistaking flipping for pitching. pitching is for distance, like a short horizantal cast under  a dock. flipping tends to be closer to the boat and vertical like hitting isolated holes in matted vegetation.

or maybe im an idiot. thats totally possible. :)

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grass beds, flipping out 15-20ft(sometimes more) in front of me

I don't know is that close to the boat?

5BL just said pitching close into docks? I do not think that is the only type of pitching but is a practical definition

"pitching is for distance, like a short horizantal cast under a dock"

I am tired but I think that is a oxymoron :-?

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Flippin' = 7'6"

Pitchin' = 6'6" or 7'....the shorter 6'6" rod lets me get in closer to docks when I'm pitchin into 2" and 3" gaps plus it doesnt get in the way as much on hooksets when most of the rod is under the dock. Its just less rod to handle in tight spots.

X2

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yes i can see why you would think what i said was retarded. lol. it was a bit oxymoronic.

maybe this will explain what i meant better.

http://www.bassresource.com/fish/flip&pitch.html

thats the diffence i think i was refering to.

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What I said flipping was was very close to how it is defined in that link ::)

Long rods are meant for leverage on getting fish out of cover, and making it easy to just flip a bait out to a spot with minium effort.....

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:-? I flip a lot and do not understand vertical flipping, Are you tossing a bait into pockets right at your boat???

I'll show you length matters: Flipping Contest, both of us in the same boat you with a 6'6'' heavy rod me with any 8 foot heavy, see who does better :)

A flipping contest?  Is that a joke?  Wow! Can you guys read?  You are agreeing with me!  Jeez.  I said a longer rod helps with flipping.  I've got a better proposition, GO FISHING.  And perhaps take an Evelyn Woodhead course, LOL.  By "flipping,"  I'll refer to these definitions:

"Flipping - best for stained to muddy water or extremely heavy cover. This is more of a short line technique. It's quieter and more accurate than any of the other cast, but can not achieve the distance sometimes needed." -Ike

"The Flip-Cast (Flippin')

This is intended for pinpoint lure presentation to visible, thick cover between 10 and 20 feet away. Use a heavy-action 6 1/2 to 7 1/2 foot rod. Let out about 15 feet of line. With your free hand, grasp the line between the reel and the first rod guide and straighten your arm to the side. There should now be about 8 feet of line past the front tip. Raise the rod to make the lure swing back close to the body. Lower the rod top to make the lure swing forward. Use only your wrist, roll the butt of the rod to the inside of your arm. As it moves past the rod tip, continue raising the rod as you feed line with your free hand. As the lure nears the target, lower the rod top again and make the bait touch down softly and precisely on target by stopping the bait just before it enters the water. Let go of the line in your free hand and immediately place it on the reel. Make sure you're ready to strike before beginning your retrieve." -Anonymour BR Writer

"Flipping. Flipping is a technique that I generally reserve for extremely heavy cover. You use the same rod and reel for flipping as for pitching...just at closer quarters. Flipping basically means to get right on top of the fish and drop the bait on their head." -***

You want more?  Ming - Gya!

If you can't pitch or flip with any rod you own, then you truly need to practice both.

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Rod length should be determined my ones overall stature; it would make as much sense for a person 5' 2 to use a 8' rod as it would for a 6' 6 person to use a 5' rod.

I'm 5' 11 ¾ and flip with a 7' rod so I'll challenge y'all to catching contest proving to y'all the rod doesn't matter it's the hands that holds it.

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OK guys, I really appreciate everyones input.  I did not intend for this post to turn into an argument, I really just wanted some input on a potential flippin/pitchin' rod purchase.

I'm just trying to figure out, before I pull the trigger, If I should go with the 7'11 mama or if I should cool it and go with something shorter.

I value all of the input I receive here-- just trying to make the best decision. My main focus next year is jigs and soft plastics, and i'm trying to see if anyone is gonna try to talk me out of a longer rod-

Best regards-

Mike

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The point is do not be button holed into believing a specific rod length is required to be proficient at a particular technique; just because Pro xyz says he uses a 7' 11 rod does not mean it will be best for you.

Go with what you are comfortable with not what KVD or Ike is comfortable with  :)

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quote

"I'll show you length matters: Flipping Contest, both of us in the same boat you with a 6'6'' heavy rod me with any 8 foot heavy, see who does better "

Whenever I see a post go in the direction this one went in, I like to look at the age of the person where it began. (not necessarily all of time pamper crowd, just sometimes :)) I have two teenagers so, I know of what I say. They know everything and there is no arguing with them.

This thread started as a question for advice and turned into an argument about definitions and an interpretation of terms. Some terms aren't subjective, they're objective. Many had the definitions and terms correct. Pitching - shorter rods / longer casts, flipping - longer rods / shorter casts. AND PERSONAL PREFERENCE  These aren't MY definitions.  They are standard bass fishing 101.

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I'm just trying to figure out, before I pull the trigger, If I should go with the 7'11 mama or if I should cool it and go with something shorter.
I have a 7' H and a 7'6" XH that I use for primarily for heavy cover.  I would like to add a 7'11" or 8' rod, but it wouldn't be for everyday.  Locally, we have some waters with huge, deep flats that are primarily coontail, and as the water level drops, it is just below the surface - great opportunity to work out a long, heavy rod.  When you swing, half the swing is setting the hook, and then the second half is lifting the fish from the cover.  I found the 7'6" took some adjustment time, but once you get used to it, its like any other specialty rod.  I'm only 5'7", BTW.  

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Longer rod= more effective in flipping grass.

You can prefer anything and I would agree with someones preference(whatever works) but the statement above is physics ;D

For what it is worth I am 6'5''.

Oh the "contest" was to prove a point and back the statement above, that a longer rod makes you more effective.

And age has nothing to do with physics buddy, I'll be the first one to say I am not that smart, but I know a small amount of facts and that first sentence is one of them.

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Dude I know of two people who can flip grass better than me; Tommy Martin is one and you aint the other.

It aint got nothing to do with physics but it has every thing to do with the man behind the rod.

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5BL just said pitching close into docks? I do not think that is the only type of pitching but is a practical definition

That was not intended to be the definition of pitchin'. Docks are just what I mainly pitch at.

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Dude I know of two people who can flip grass better than me; Tommy Martin is one and you aint the other.

It aint got nothing to do with physics but it has every thing to do with the man behind the rod.

I've never seen you flip, but I'll put my money on Denny Brauer or Dee Thomas. BTW, Denny showed me how to flip years ago.

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Mike - to answer your question.  go with the 7 footer.  It will serve your needs for multiple presentations.  Most of the time around here, the flippin bite is the only bite, and it is in the heaviest of grasses.  I have a 7-6 heavy and a 7 mh I use for both flippin and pitching.  The extra 6 inches is nice but after 4 hours of flipping and with both forearms burning, the 7 footer is the way I wind up finishing tournaments.  I don't think I have never lost a fish because of the shorter rod.

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Your physical stature has everything to do with the length of rod you should use when deciding on a flipping stick. I am 6' and I have no business with a flipping rod over 7' in my hand. It is too long to get the correct presentation.

Everyone thinks the longer the better. That is entirely wrong. There are instances (Boat Docks) when I prefer a 6'6" flipping rod in my hand. Also, the height from the water's surface will make a big difference. Some boats with higher decks will allow the use of a longer rod. It just depends on your current setup.

Nothing worse than slapping your rod against the deck or the water's surface while trying to present a lure. All depends on you.

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