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You will get better hooksets with a longer rod ?????????

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Do you know how many times I have read that statement ????? Somebody explain it to me. Ok, here is the set-up, 7 ft. spinning, 1/4 oz tube, mono line, tight or semi tight line, and you get a bump. Now you have 7ft. of rod bending over and the tip is pretty far out there before it has a chance to move and then there is the amount of line factor to be dealt with. Ok, now same set-up, but with less rod, say 6'3" to load up, and less line between you and the fish. Less rod, less line, hook set to fish faster ! Allot of people advocate 7' plus rods, So is there more than casting distance involved here?

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Someone in my club told me it was about leverage. With a longer rod you have more leverage over a fish right after the hookset and during the fight, however once the fish gets near the boat he said that a long rod will give the fish more leverage against you.

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Someone in my club told me it was about leverage. With a longer rod you have more leverage over a fish right after the hookset and during the fight, however once the fish gets near the boat he said that a long rod will give the fish more leverage against you.

This always comes up in these discussions and it's completely incorrect. A longer rod gives the angler LESS leverage than a shorter rod. It's simple physics. Let's look at it in detail.

The fish is providing the force on the lever (your rod). Your hands are the fulcrum point of the lever (where the lever pivots). The further the distance from the fulcrum point the less power required to move the lever. It's why breaker bars are used on sockets, crowbars are used at all, etc and why they use short rods for fishing for tuna and BIG fish.  People that think they get more leverage are mixing up the fulcrum point. It's at your hands and not at the fish.

A longer rod will move more line on the hookset. We can equate the rod to the radius of a circle. A shorter rod will result in a smaller circumference so as the angler sets the hook from say 3 o'clock to 12 o'clock (1/4 of the circumference of a circle) the distance the rod tip travels is less in a shorter rod than a longer rod.

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This always comes up in these discussions and it's completely incorrect.

Not entirely....a longer handle gives you more leverage.  :D

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Do you know how many times I have read that statement ????? Somebody explain it to me. Ok, here is the set-up, 7 ft. spinning, 1/4 oz tube, mono line, tight or semi tight line, and you get a bump. Now you have 7ft. of rod bending over and the tip is pretty far out there before it has a chance to move and then there is the amount of line factor to be dealt with. Ok, now same set-up, but with less rod, say 6'3" to load up, and less line between you and the fish. Less rod, less line, hook set to fish faster ! Allot of people advocate 7' plus rods, So is there more than casting distance involved here?

First off, one of the most common mistakes people make is thinking that a 7' rod gives you 7' of power. That is false. If you compare two 7' rods, most of the time the reel seets will be at different spots on the bottom end of the rod. You could have a 7' spinning rod with a 15" rear grip, which gives you 69 inches of leverage. A 6'6" spinning rod with a 9" rear grip also gives you 69 inches of leverage. See what I mean? A lot of times a longer rod means the same amount of leverage but with a longer butt section.

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This always comes up in these discussions and it's completely incorrect.

Not entirely....a longer handle gives you more leverage. :D

Sure, if you hold the rod at the reel seat and are exerting force downward on the end of the handle then you have a lever behind the reel seat and a lever in front of it.  The one in front works for the fish and the one behind works for the angler.  If you aren't pushing down on the end of the handle, but instead have it pressed against your body then the pivot point has moved to the end of the handle increasing the length of the fish's lever.  Giving you less leverage again.   ;)

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We're talking about hooksets...Leverage is not the issue here.

Longer rods take up line more quickly on a hookset, giving more immediate pressure. A longer rod swept from 10 o'clock to 12 o'clock will move more line than a shorter rod swept the same way.

Leverage comes into effect while fighting the fish more than in hooking it.

edit: whoops, didn't see that Tyrius already said basically the same thing.

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I use leverage during the hookset when fishing heavy heavy cover.  I set the hook, and lift the fish out in one motion.  Its why I prefer a moderate XH rod with a long handle.  The handle is under my elbow.  A short handle would give me less leverage.  Some of you guys over think this stuff, LOL.  I figured out what works on the water.

8-)

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Unless you are targeting pike or muskie I don't find leverage and hookset to be much of an issue, at least not for me, as J Francho said too much over thinking.

Leverage offshore is a major issue, that's why 7' rods have a long foregrip, to take back some of that leverage.  I don't question the rod manufacturers , the right rod for the target species.

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I like 10" + handles on rods and that normally means at least 7'.  Seems like most companies are extendingg the length on rods nows, I guess that's what most people want.

I picked up a 6'9" Vendetta a few weeks ago and really like the length on it. I'll have to try a Zillion 6'9" since I really love Daiwa's reel seats. 

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Some buddies and I were talking about fishing rods, and handles, and how some are completely unsuited for kayak fishing.  We came up with the idea of a 7-6 MH/F rod, with a pistol grip, but with an optional fighting butt, like on heavier weight flyrods, and a very short foregrip, simply for landing.  If you've sen any of my kayak video, you would know what I mean.   I would get better hooksets while sitting down with such a rod.

The point is, application on the water, where you fish, what you fish, and how will be the biggest things that determine your hookset.

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Some of you guys over think this stuff, LOL. I figured out what works on the water.

8-)

It doesn't take much thought to figure it out.  You just have to remember what you learned in high school physics.

In all honesty, the angler isn't really going to notice that much of a difference.  The weights that are being applied are not very much and everyone should be able to handle the difference between a regular rod and a 7'6" rod or longer.  The drag, line, or rod will likely fail before the angler runs out of "power" to hold the rod in position.

I just get annoyed when something that is blatantly incorrect is taken at face value and accepted as a benefit.  It's just a flaw that I have.

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A sharper hook point and a thinner diameter hook will both make hook penetration easier.

The least stretchy line will make hooksets easier.

A stiffer rod will make hooksets easier.

Increased rod tip speed will make hooksets easier.  (this is can be improved with a longer rod)

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Longer rod takes up more slack in the line so for some baits you want that (jig, texas rigs), others I don't (treble hooked baits).

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So, on further review, the answer is "maybe".  For the past few years, I've determined that most of my hook setting issues, soft plastic, crank, spinnerbait, whatever, were caused by "operator error".

I have a decent selection of rods, both in quality and numbers.  Now, I think if I could shift the majority of the blame for my hook setting woes to my rods, I'd feel better about myself and the bait monkey would be thrilled.

I need more money.  I must re-allocate my assets.  I'll go on a diet.  I'll feed the bait monkey instead of myself.  What a concept.

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